70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by moab » Fri Oct 02, 2015 1:35 pm

You've gotta read this guys blog. He spent 70 days in Alaska on his own with no food. All he brought along (besides equipment) was salt and pepper. At the top of his blog is a link to his gear list. Of note he took a rocket stove and a pressure cooker with canning jars with him. And an inflatable wide kayak sort of boat. The canning system was a genius move IMHO. Although I wish they made better jars that weren't prone to breaking like glass is. Maybe they exist? I don't know.

Here he is explaining his adventure. But the blog is a must read if your into long term living in the woods. VERY interesting blog!:

"I always wanted to try something like this, so this summer I had a bush plane drop me off in late June in the Kootznoowoo Wilderness of southeast Alaska, with a scheduled pickup for early September. I brought survival gear, but NO FOOD at all, only salt and pepper.

It was a challenging experience but extremely satisfying. I fished, hunted and foraged for wild plants and berries."

http://bucktrack.com/Alaska_Survival_Journal.html

Here's his gear list if you missed it:

http://bucktrack.com/Alaska_Survival_Journal.html
Last edited by moab on Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by moab » Fri Oct 02, 2015 1:54 pm

Interesting tip in one of his other gear lists for hunting sheep. "Measuring Tape Pre-measure a length of parachute cord and it will have dual use."
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by doc66 » Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:46 am

Groovy, thanks, just what I need is another blog to read! :awesome:

ETA: it's a quick read and interesting. The comment section gives more information on the trip, but he doesn't post more pics after the initial few in the blog. Just FYI.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by ROCK6 » Thu Oct 15, 2015 5:15 am

This is actually an excellent blog and he posted to questions over on the Survivalist Boards. He did have a lot of gear and his kayak, but regulations meant he had to move his camp periodically (I think it was every 30 days). What’s amazing is he did this all with current hunting licenses and adhering to regulations. This was the right time of season for berries and other edibles, but is pretty darn amazing he did this with no food except what he could hunt, fish and forage.

A couple of highlights:

His canning setup was brilliant. Unfortunately, it looked like he over-tightened some of the canning jars which broke, but he had enough that when he could can much of his fish and crab meat to extend his food when there were slumps. He did shoot one deer, but wished he could have bagged another. He also augmented his diet with a LOT of berries, which he also canned. This was a simply brilliant setup that allowed him to really thrive (but his diet did lead to quite a bit of weight loss, but in a good way).

His electronic bear fence was pretty cool as well. He admits he had to kayak into a lodge area for internet access and to recharge some electronics. I can’t recall how effective his solar setup was but he did use it when the sun was out.

The biggest lesson was to setup a separate camp for food prep, canning and cooking and he also used a bear hang.

This was a great experiment and a great read. If you have the time, it’s well worth it with some great take-aways.

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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by moab » Thu Oct 15, 2015 12:00 pm

ROCK6 wrote:This is actually an excellent blog and he posted to questions over on the Survivalist Boards. He did have a lot of gear and his kayak, but regulations meant he had to move his camp periodically (I think it was every 30 days). What’s amazing is he did this all with current hunting licenses and adhering to regulations. This was the right time of season for berries and other edibles, but is pretty darn amazing he did this with no food except what he could hunt, fish and forage.

A couple of highlights:

His canning setup was brilliant. Unfortunately, it looked like he over-tightened some of the canning jars which broke, but he had enough that when he could can much of his fish and crab meat to extend his food when there were slumps. He did shoot one deer, but wished he could have bagged another. He also augmented his diet with a LOT of berries, which he also canned. This was a simply brilliant setup that allowed him to really thrive (but his diet did lead to quite a bit of weight loss, but in a good way).

His electronic bear fence was pretty cool as well. He admits he had to kayak into a lodge area for internet access and to recharge some electronics. I can’t recall how effective his solar setup was but he did use it when the sun was out.

The biggest lesson was to setup a separate camp for food prep, canning and cooking and he also used a bear hang.

This was a great experiment and a great read. If you have the time, it’s well worth it with some great take-aways.

ROCK6
Finally. Someone else read it besides me. :) It is an excellent blog. I would have NEVER thought of a canning setup.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by moab » Thu Oct 15, 2015 12:06 pm

I just invited him to contribute on here. Hopefully he does.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by ROCK6 » Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:15 pm

moab wrote:
Finally. Someone else read it besides me. :) It is an excellent blog. I would have NEVER thought of a canning setup.
That canning setup was seriously awesome...I would never have that of it in that type of situation and environment, but solves an often hard problem of preserving food long term, especially when resources are hit or miss or limited by season. This is something for any serious prepper to consider and this experiment proves its' a very viable, mobile option.

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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by RonnyRonin » Thu Oct 15, 2015 8:15 pm

ROCK6 wrote:
moab wrote:
Finally. Someone else read it besides me. :) It is an excellent blog. I would have NEVER thought of a canning setup.
That canning setup was seriously awesome...I would never have that of it in that type of situation and environment, but solves an often hard problem of preserving food long term, especially when resources are hit or miss or limited by season. This is something for any serious prepper to consider and this experiment proves its' a very viable, mobile option.

ROCK6
Same here, never would have even considered it but he totally proved it.

My main takeaways: I get pretty focused on foot-mobile camp setups, but having transportation (here a boat) opened up a whole world of potential for longer term living. Also noticed his truly waterproof, non-breathable rain gear. For long term field use this might be the only viable option.

I have wondered if a packable tipi and wood stove can really be beat as the cornerstone to a mobile long term living arrangement. Lots of good long-term primitive shelters that can be built, but none so mobile or labor efficient.

So my next main thought: what semi-primitive food preservation options are out there that don't involve glass jars? could some kind of manual vacuum sealer (hand pump?) be combined with boiling-in-bag to extend food life? smoking/curing/drying always seemed iffy to me.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by alaska » Sat Oct 17, 2015 11:21 am

Thanks to Moab for the invite to this forum. I'm the guy who made that trip.

The canning operation worked great for food preservation. There's always a learning curve, though. Over-tightening the jar lids was a rookie mistake although most batches worked out perfectly. Glass jar breakage is definitely a consideration for the long term though. I chipped a couple of jar lips just in normal handling. I didn't actually can any berries, just used the jars for temporary berry storage. I canned a lot of halibut, crab, salmon and deer meat though! Having a cache of preserved meat was vital. It's amazing how much meat a person has to eat. Its apparent if you read the journals of Lewis and Clark. I ate about 3 lbs of meat a day, not including berries and wild plants.

The solar charging worked very well by taking advantage of the periodic sunny days. The long paddle to the lodge every couple of weeks was a necessary "evil" to keep people from worrying too much. (Research had told me there were pockets of cell coverage, there weren't.) If I had to do it over again I would have brought a DeLorme Inreach for the "I'm OK" updates.

A tipi tent and a tiny wood stove does seem like a hard-to-beat combo.

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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by duodecima » Sun Oct 18, 2015 12:38 pm

RonnyRonin wrote:...what semi-primitive food preservation options are out there that don't involve glass jars? could some kind of manual vacuum sealer (hand pump?) be combined with boiling-in-bag to extend food life? smoking/curing/drying always seemed iffy to me.
No expertise in bushcraft myself but in terms of food preservation, smoking/curing/drying are not particularly "iffy" when done right. I have home-dried veggies (peppers) that are still crisp and non-moldy over 2 years later. Granted, some of that is because I put them in sealed containers after drying them so they didn't pick up any moisture from the air!

You can't duplicate anything like what happens in a canner with plastic bag/vacuum sealer, etc.* The 'magic' of the canner is that the jars allow steam out past their seals, so the contents can be brought up to a temperature that will kill pathogens with extreme reliability but then self-seals as the temp goes down so nothing can get in and re-contaminate. I don't believe there are any non-glass jars. I swear there was a thread here a few years ago where we discussed that but of course I can't find it. IF there are any non-glass jars, it's going to be something like pyrex - less breakable but still very heavy.

(*at least not with any commercially made products or tested system. It's probably scientifically feasible to create such a system - special bag or some such - but I would not use it over tried and true methods such as glass jars, or curing/drying etc., until it had been studied and approved for home use, myself. B/c botulism sucks. )

Apropos of nothing, fermenting is another techinque to prolong the safe life of some foods, and it can be used on some foods that aren't commonly done that way in the US today. (beans & greens, mostly).

Welcome, ROCK6! I look forward to reading the blog.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by moab » Sun Oct 18, 2015 12:54 pm

alaska wrote:Thanks to Moab for the invite to this forum. I'm the guy who made that trip.

The canning operation worked great for food preservation. There's always a learning curve, though. Over-tightening the jar lids was a rookie mistake although most batches worked out perfectly. Glass jar breakage is definitely a consideration for the long term though. I chipped a couple of jar lips just in normal handling. I didn't actually can any berries, just used the jars for temporary berry storage. I canned a lot of halibut, crab, salmon and deer meat though! Having a cache of preserved meat was vital. It's amazing how much meat a person has to eat. Its apparent if you read the journals of Lewis and Clark. I ate about 3 lbs of meat a day, not including berries and wild plants.

The solar charging worked very well by taking advantage of the periodic sunny days. The long paddle to the lodge every couple of weeks was a necessary "evil" to keep people from worrying too much. (Research had told me there were pockets of cell coverage, there weren't.) If I had to do it over again I would have brought a DeLorme Inreach for the "I'm OK" updates.

A tipi tent and a tiny wood stove does seem like a hard-to-beat combo.
Thanks for joining us! This is awesome to be able to ask a person questions that has actually done it. Your truly an inspiration.

To the question of non glass jars. I did a little research yesterday on it. And found an AK university that details canning in cans. But it requires a metal can sealer about the size of a hand crank meat grinder. Didn't read enough to know what you did then. But I would imagine you then need a canner to preserve whatever is in your cans. And then you have the fact that the cans aren't reusable. You'd think someone would make a canning container out of something other than glass. But I can't find it. You'd think it would sell like hotcakes. But then again if it was possible you'd think someone would have done it by now.

What was your tent/stove set up, alaska? I don't remember from your blog. But I have a memory problem. So forgive me.

Patrick
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by azrancher » Sun Oct 18, 2015 2:55 pm

moab wrote:He spent 70 days in Alaska on his own with no food. All he brought along (besides equipment) was salt and pepper. At the top of his blog is a link to his gear list. Of note he took a rocket stove and a pressure cooker with canning jars with him.
Well... I'll be honest with you 70 days of the best time of year to be in Alaska is not hard to do, lets see him do 365 days....

Rancher

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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by moab » Sun Oct 18, 2015 3:48 pm

azrancher wrote:
moab wrote:He spent 70 days in Alaska on his own with no food. All he brought along (besides equipment) was salt and pepper. At the top of his blog is a link to his gear list. Of note he took a rocket stove and a pressure cooker with canning jars with him.
Well... I'll be honest with you 70 days of the best time of year to be in Alaska is not hard to do, lets see him do 365 days....

Rancher
We've invited this great adventurer and writer to the forum and this thread. And this is how you welcome him? Kind of rude IMHO. Or did you not read the thread and see that he had joined us? His username is Alaska. And he just joined us about 5 post ahead of yours.

Sometimes we don't look around to see who's listening before we post. How about we welcome him to the forum with something constructive?
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food!

Post by RonnyRonin » Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:53 pm

duodecima wrote:
RonnyRonin wrote:...what semi-primitive food preservation options are out there that don't involve glass jars? could some kind of manual vacuum sealer (hand pump?) be combined with boiling-in-bag to extend food life? smoking/curing/drying always seemed iffy to me.
No expertise in bushcraft myself but in terms of food preservation, smoking/curing/drying are not particularly "iffy" when done right. I have home-dried veggies (peppers) that are still crisp and non-moldy over 2 years later. Granted, some of that is because I put them in sealed containers after drying them so they didn't pick up any moisture from the air!

You can't duplicate anything like what happens in a canner with plastic bag/vacuum sealer, etc.* The 'magic' of the canner is that the jars allow steam out past their seals, so the contents can be brought up to a temperature that will kill pathogens with extreme reliability but then self-seals as the temp goes down so nothing can get in and re-contaminate. I don't believe there are any non-glass jars. I swear there was a thread here a few years ago where we discussed that but of course I can't find it. IF there are any non-glass jars, it's going to be something like pyrex - less breakable but still very heavy.

(*at least not with any commercially made products or tested system. It's probably scientifically feasible to create such a system - special bag or some such - but I would not use it over tried and true methods such as glass jars, or curing/drying etc., until it had been studied and approved for home use, myself. B/c botulism sucks. )

Apropos of nothing, fermenting is another techinque to prolong the safe life of some foods, and it can be used on some foods that aren't commonly done that way in the US today. (beans & greens, mostly).

Welcome, ROCK6! I look forward to reading the blog.
I didn't mean iffy in the safety way, at home it seems a simple and effective thing, I meant iffy as in "time consuming and possibly hard to replicate in a field environment." I'll admit I only skimmed the blog but if I remember right there was a mention of not having the time to guard a smoking/drying setup from hungry critters for the time it took to do a good job.

It seems like every survival book has some page on smoking the meat of whatever wild game you just killed by building a tripod and hanging it over a fire. A fire which they the authors always seem to think is no big deal to keep going with a consistent smoke output for 3 straight days.

My main thought for the "boil in bag" thing I mentioned is MREs. they are basically canned food in a pouch, I never researched it in-depth but I was under the impression they where cooked after the pouch was sealed. Even if you could only replicate half the shelf life of an MRE it would be perfectly adequate for getting through tough seasons.


azrancher wrote:Well... I'll be honest with you 70 days of the best time of year to be in Alaska is not hard to do, lets see him do 365 days....

Rancher

Yeah, you are going to have to back that up. plenty of people don't have an easy time fully provisioned. Care to share some of the examples of other people demonstrating the ease of this feat? Have you done anything similar? I doubt there are all that many people that spend a solid 70 days out of doors (willingly and recreationally) in a stretch. Even most of the long-distant hikers break it up with hotel and hostel stays. I've heard of primitive living die-hards doing similar things but most of them go out in groups, and most of the bad-ass mountain man loner examples where very well provisioned, and usually had a stationary, more substantial shelter.

And I would love to hear even one documented example of a one-man team doing a full year with no outside provisions and only the equipment transportable by a single person, while following local laws. Maybe you took some pictures the last time you did it?

If you look around the website beyond the Alaska entry, you can see Buck has a very impressive outdoors resume, we could all learn a lot from him.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by Woods Walker » Sun Oct 18, 2015 5:55 pm

alaska wrote:
A tipi tent and a tiny wood stove does seem like a hard-to-beat combo.
Oh yes it is... :D

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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by Woods Walker » Sun Oct 18, 2015 6:08 pm

azrancher wrote:
moab wrote:He spent 70 days in Alaska on his own with no food. All he brought along (besides equipment) was salt and pepper. At the top of his blog is a link to his gear list. Of note he took a rocket stove and a pressure cooker with canning jars with him.
Well... I'll be honest with you 70 days of the best time of year to be in Alaska is not hard to do, lets see him do 365 days....

Rancher
Rancher to make such an analysis would imply extensive field experience. I would enjoy seeing some photos or video of your outings and methodologies.
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by moab » Mon Oct 19, 2015 4:16 pm

I've got a few questions and comments for you, Buck:

EcoZoom Versa Rocket Stove - Did you ever consider anything home made or lighter weight? 14lbs is a lot. I wonder if you could change the iron grate out for sheet metal of some kind. But I guess it has to support the canning system. So there's that.

Have you ever checked out http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/ ? It's a gear review site by professional hikers, trekkers and mountain climbers - guys like you actually. a lot of good info on many different types of equipment. Solar chargers to sleeping bags to boots. It's a pretty comprehensive site. You should check it out sometime. I'd love to get your opinion on it. Heck you could be a reviewer for them. They actually reviewed your sleeping bag line too - feathered friends. Probably other of your gear just have not checked. I see why you went with those bags now - 900 fill down and 2.5lbs. Nice bags. Wish I could afford one. lol!

You might check out this weather/shortwave radio. viewtopic.php?f=42&t=114224&p=2545207&h ... o#p2545207 It's a lot lighter than the one you took. And I think has a lot more functions. Interesting thread nonetheless. And it runs off AA's. Which I loved about your outfit - only two types of bats. Good thinking.

I was surprised you recommended down puffer jackets for "wet" and cold. I agree. Mine is great. It weighs nothing and provides more insulation than any other piece of gear I carry. Other than perhaps my down sleeping bag. I keep it waterproofed with Nikwax down treatment. And keep it under some sort of rain shell if it's raining. Key piece of gear right there IMHO. I'm a big guy 6'3" 225+ it took me a while to find a hooded down puffer jacket that was lightweight. I ended up finding one at REI. Some no name brand. But it came in a small 5x that fit just right. I know I talk about it all the time. But I love that jacket. That and my UKGI Goretex. lol.

Nice tent and stove! I buy my stuff sacks from TiGoat. All I can afford on their site. lol! ;) But a great deal on their sacks. It doesn't say what the tent is made out of but I assume silnylon? That stove is the bomb too. So light and small and easy to set up. I've never used a stove/tent before. This has me thinking. A bad thing for my checkbook. lol. How did you like it?

Lastly, have you ever considered military surplus gear? I love my Czech mess kit. Just the right size and weight for me. It's aluminum though. And some don't like that. I also like military surplus goretex pants and jackets. Can't beat the price. And Goretex is Goretex. I also prefer the USGI MSS bivy (goretex). Cheap and rugged as hell. I think it would match your trips a lot. For quality and keeping your down bag safe. I have not read your other trip blogs. But if you ever tarp camp a USGI bivy is a nice combo. I did notice your P-38. Can't beat those anywhere eh? Even if you didn't use it. lol.

Patrick
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by ROCK6 » Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:28 am

azrancher wrote:
moab wrote:He spent 70 days in Alaska on his own with no food. All he brought along (besides equipment) was salt and pepper. At the top of his blog is a link to his gear list. Of note he took a rocket stove and a pressure cooker with canning jars with him.
Well... I'll be honest with you 70 days of the best time of year to be in Alaska is not hard to do, lets see him do 365 days....

Rancher
This is a pretty flip and ignorant comment. 70 days anywhere, during the best season without food is no walk in the park regardless of your skill and experience. Add the fact that he had to adhere to all the current hunting, fishing and game regulations, you comment is simply stupid.

If you put the “experiment” into context, it was pretty amazing. To suggest it was a cake walk either shows you are clueless or just being a blow-hard. Every habitable location on the planet has seasonal changes that affect flora and fauna with regards to foraging and food collection (including fishing or hunting). Without game regulations, it would have been much easier to hunt and fish where you could store up more food for the harsher seasons. I’m sorry Rancher, that was a pretty disingenuous comment that offers no insight other than your ignorance of a pretty serious experiment and efforts of one individual that at least did something rather than criticize someone else’s efforts from the comforts of their home.

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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by alaska » Sun Oct 25, 2015 8:28 pm

moab wrote:I've got a few questions and comments for you, Buck:

EcoZoom Versa Rocket Stove - Did you ever consider anything home made or lighter weight? 14lbs is a lot. I wonder if you could change the iron grate out for sheet metal of some kind. But I guess it has to support the canning system. So there's that.

Have you ever checked out http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/ ? It's a gear review site by professional hikers, trekkers and mountain climbers - guys like you actually. a lot of good info on many different types of equipment. Solar chargers to sleeping bags to boots. It's a pretty comprehensive site. You should check it out sometime. I'd love to get your opinion on it. Heck you could be a reviewer for them. They actually reviewed your sleeping bag line too - feathered friends. Probably other of your gear just have not checked. I see why you went with those bags now - 900 fill down and 2.5lbs. Nice bags. Wish I could afford one. lol!

You might check out this weather/shortwave radio. viewtopic.php?f=42&t=114224&p=2545207&h ... o#p2545207 It's a lot lighter than the one you took. And I think has a lot more functions. Interesting thread nonetheless. And it runs off AA's. Which I loved about your outfit - only two types of bats. Good thinking.

I was surprised you recommended down puffer jackets for "wet" and cold. I agree. Mine is great. It weighs nothing and provides more insulation than any other piece of gear I carry. Other than perhaps my down sleeping bag. I keep it waterproofed with Nikwax down treatment. And keep it under some sort of rain shell if it's raining. Key piece of gear right there IMHO. I'm a big guy 6'3" 225+ it took me a while to find a hooded down puffer jacket that was lightweight. I ended up finding one at REI. Some no name brand. But it came in a small 5x that fit just right. I know I talk about it all the time. But I love that jacket. That and my UKGI Goretex. lol.

Nice tent and stove! I buy my stuff sacks from TiGoat. All I can afford on their site. lol! ;) But a great deal on their sacks. It doesn't say what the tent is made out of but I assume silnylon? That stove is the bomb too. So light and small and easy to set up. I've never used a stove/tent before. This has me thinking. A bad thing for my checkbook. lol. How did you like it?

Lastly, have you ever considered military surplus gear? I love my Czech mess kit. Just the right size and weight for me. It's aluminum though. And some don't like that. I also like military surplus goretex pants and jackets. Can't beat the price. And Goretex is Goretex. I also prefer the USGI MSS bivy (goretex). Cheap and rugged as hell. I think it would match your trips a lot. For quality and keeping your down bag safe. I have not read your other trip blogs. But if you ever tarp camp a USGI bivy is a nice combo. I did notice your P-38. Can't beat those anywhere eh? Even if you didn't use it. lol.

Patrick
Hi Patrick,

On this trip weight wasn't a big concern so I went with a rocket stove that had good reviews. This one worked great and was very efficient, but you're right, it is heavy. In hindsight I should at least have left the door home because I always used it with the door open. If I were selecting a stove where weight was a greater consideration I'd consider something homemade or another commercial design. I think the insulation is the greatest cause of this stove's weight.

That Tecsun PL-360 radio looks good. I might have put too much emphasis on the ability to power the radio I had with a hand crank or to directly charge it with my solar charger.

I've got some military Goretex raingear, and I probably have the same style Czech mess kit you have! Lots of good military surplus gear out there. No better military gadget than the P-38!

The Outdoorgearlab site is a fine site. The internet is a great resource for researching.

I love quality down sleeping bags. I was just sleeping in that same Feathered Friends bag in the backcountry of Yellowstone. I've had it for fifteen years and as far as I can tell it performs like new. If there is one place quality is money well spent it's in a good down bag in my opinion.

I had to look at my gear list. A down jacket is a standard piece of backpacking gear for me, but on that list the Micro Puff jacket I have listed is synthetic. As much as I like down, for that rain forest I think synthetics are a better choice in general.

That Titanium Goat tent is silnylon. A great piece of equipment. Woods Walker, it looks like that's what you have? As much as I liked having that shelter for that trip, I am usually using a backpacking tent or a wall tent, so I sold the TiGoat. One thing about them is they hold their value.

You are right Rock6, following the fish and game laws adds to the challenge. I was throwing back crabs 1/4" too small when I was hungry. And I could have shot a deer a month earlier, easy, or shot a doe when it was bucks only. And bagged some geese and mallards before season or shot a seal and got an enormous supply of meat all at once.

That said it is definitely fish and game rich country, and that's why I chose it.

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Blackdog
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by Blackdog » Fri Nov 06, 2015 2:25 pm

Hells Bells I'm impressed. I think the criticizing of picking the right place at the right time to be bs, 70 days out is still 70 days out in Alaska where weather never I stops happening Iven during good times.

Alaska, thanks for the report on a great adventure. The urge to bust the game laws must have been high.
Luck is stupid as a cow
and blind as a bat

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alaska
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by alaska » Sun Nov 29, 2015 8:12 am

I just finished up a 300 page book about the experience: Alone in the Fortress of the Bears: 70 Days Surviving Wilderness Alaska: Foraging, Fishing, Hunting.

You can check out the cover and see the basic outline of the story at the link in the OP.

Thanks!

Buck

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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by Honeycutt » Mon Jan 04, 2016 2:01 pm

Very impressive Buck, and a great read. I'd love to do something like this I'd time allowed, I'd probably bring some food though, I don't trust myself in a situation like that with no food.
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alaska
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by alaska » Tue Jan 31, 2017 12:45 pm

I've put together a new highlight video about the trip if you'd like to check it out: https://youtu.be/SlZoZxIe6CQ


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moab
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Re: 70 days in Alaska. No food! INCH scenario sort of...

Post by moab » Tue Jan 31, 2017 1:22 pm

alaska wrote:I've put together a new highlight video about the trip if you'd like to check it out: https://youtu.be/SlZoZxIe6CQ


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Wow! That was awesome! I'm so glad I posted this thread. What a journey. And to think you've introduced us all to canning in the wild. You really (when and if you have time) need to do a thread and how to on canning in the wild. I'd love to learn more about that process and the different options for canners.

Thanks again. What an amazing trip/video/book!
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