Bicycle BOB

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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manowar1313
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Bicycle BOB

Post by manowar1313 » Thu Aug 21, 2014 10:31 pm

I've been toying around with the idea for sometime now about developing a BOB for my bicycle.
In the last year or so I've gotten back into mountain biking. So I've been riding about 10 miles every other day and 20+ miles on the weekends when I have more time. Part of my bug out plan is bringing along my mountain bike, but I want to develop a BOB specifically for if I need to leave just on my bike (EMP or something).
Now I do have a bike bag already, usually when I'm around my house I keep 25lb of weights in it to get some extra training. I personally like this bag because it mounts to my handlebars over my tire so I can carry it and my normal BOB. The items I usually carry in it are pictured below:

The bag has a 2L Camelback type bladder.
A tire repair kit also a spare tube for my bike (Not shown).
Cheap knife and lighter.
Water tablets and hand sanitizer.
Basic first aid kit (Blue) and sunblock.
Flashlight and 2 headlamps.
5 Hr energy that I ripped the label off of.
25 rounds of .22 and 30 ft of 550 para.

Also usually kept in the bag are a can of fixaflat, a spare tire and a bag of trail mix.
Image

The tire pump is off the bike and I have lights on the bike. I also keep 3 chains on the bike and my bike keys have a cheap but useful compass. The bike also is set up for 2 water bottles that I keep in the fridge.

So any suggestions for things I should add? Weight is not an issue
Also here's the link to my actual BOB.
http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/view ... 4&t=112163
Last edited by manowar1313 on Sun Aug 24, 2014 9:30 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by Burncycle » Thu Aug 21, 2014 11:16 pm

Are you going to go ahead and mount this to your bike semi-permanently, or just keep it at home / handy in case you need to deliberately use your bike to get out of dodge?

The reason I ask is because for most typical day to day activities (since you actually use the bike often) your biggest risk is from theft of items if your bag is mounted routinely. In such a case it would probably be wiser to stick to the practical items you've already added (minus the ammo) since they'd be bike repair specific / supplementary to your BOB and not really a stand alone thing. In other words, extra stuff that's already covered by your BOB, but it all depends on your philosophy of use. You can always stuff some ammo and stuff in last minute if you needed to ever actually use it in that fashion.

Since you might not have your BOB on you when you find you need to scoot (say in the middle of one of your 20 milers!) I would throw in a couple of multi-tools, eye-pro (shooting glasses at a minimum or swim goggles if you want to keep dust out too), couple N95 masks, First aid stuff catered to what you may encounter as a biker (SAM splint, Ace Bandages for sprains, instant ice packs, Tourniquet, neosporin spay and Kerlix since anything non catastrophic is going to at least involve some sort of wide area abrasion or road rash). Spare batteries at a minimum, and a battery pack for your phone. Fast acting energy gels and maybe powdered drink mix for electrolytes. Does your bike have a bottle holder? If not one of those collapsable 1 L bags could supplement your 2 liter bladder, maybe even a sawyer filter.

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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by bltjr1951 » Fri Aug 22, 2014 8:31 am

Why a "cheap knife".
Wouldn't a "good knife" be better?

I figure one of the $ knives from Walmart would last 72hrs, but I would want a better knife for regular use.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by itzybitzyspyder » Fri Aug 22, 2014 8:55 am

This is less of a BOB for a bike and more of an EDC.
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manowar1313
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by manowar1313 » Fri Aug 22, 2014 6:19 pm

Really I wear this when I am riding my bike 3-4x per week. I don't routinely keep it mounted to the bike but it can be so I can carry by actual BOB too. I guess my philosophy with this bag is I don't want it to replace my current BOB but I probably will take it with me if I need to bug out, so it's more of a supplemental bag that I use while riding.

The knife is "Cheap" in that it's not a Benchmade or some top dollar knife. It's a Gerber 3.00 fine edge that I got for $35 at walmart.
Realistically now the bag is only 10% full. The main part of the bag only carries trail mix and the bottom usually just has my cellphone. I don't keep any eye protection because I wear glasses and have a pair of spam prescription transition glasses I wear when I'm outside or working out and at $250 a pop they're a little expensive to committee to a BOB.
I probably won't be riding my bike if I need to use an M95, do you think a bandana would be more useful/multipurpose if I'm out when something happens?

Things I'm going to add:
4 pack of AA batteries (These will fit all my lights and a headlamp)
Bandana
Super glue
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by woodsghost » Fri Aug 22, 2014 7:09 pm

What I have been told multiple times is that a bandanna does not replace a N-95. If you think you will need biological protection, get the N-95. Bandanna will cut down on dust. I have used it to do just that. But I also know from a lot of personal experience that a mask captures way more than the bandanna does, and allows me to work in environments that I could not work in with just a bandanna.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by zero11010 » Fri Aug 22, 2014 7:27 pm

I'm a little fuzzy on the intended usage of this.

Are you intending this to be a get home bag (something which for most people means it contains materials to keep them going for 6-12 hours), are you intending this to be more of a bug out bag (something which for most people means it contains materials to keep them going for roughly 72 hours), or did you have another usage in mind?

What type of environment do you see this being used in? How close to cities/towns do you typically ride?

If you needed to bug out and were to use the contents of this bag to help you, where do you envision going with it?

It's being called a Bob. For a couple of days you absolutely do not NEED to have more than a 5 hr energy drink and a bag of trail mix of unknown size (plus the water you carry). But, it means you're not intending to eat much. I'm curious about the three different lights plus backup batteries. You're planning on an emergency where you don't need much in the way of food, and you don't need any additional materials for warmth or rain, but you do need to have multiple lights available at all times.

If you're only going to have one knife (which is totally fine) a lot of people really swear by having a fixed blade knife. You can go with an inexpensive mora (less cost than your folder), but a quality (if inexpensive) fixed blade knife will give you more options with your blade than most folding knives.

You may want to consider a sawyer filter over the drops. The sawyer filter system has a bit more versatility.

You may want a whistle or some method of attracting audible attention.

What do you usually do for light when you ride at night? Do you do the light on the handle bars? Do you have a light that mounts to your helmet? You have two headlamps, do you stretch one out over your helmet?

You have a handful of bullets, I'm assuming you have a small firearm to use them with?

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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by manowar1313 » Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:38 pm

zero11010 wrote:I'm a little fuzzy on the intended usage of this.

Are you intending this to be a get home bag (something which for most people means it contains materials to keep them going for 6-12 hours), are you intending this to be more of a bug out bag (something which for most people means it contains materials to keep them going for roughly 72 hours), or did you have another usage in mind?
I am really intending it to be a bit of everything. Something similar to a car bag but that is more stand alone but not quite as extensive as my current BOB. I would like to uncomfortably be able to use this bag overnight should something happen and I get stranded out in the wilderness on my bike. That being said I also don't want to overcomplicated this bag and make something to elaborate to bring on daily rides.
zero11010 wrote:What type of environment do you see this being used in? How close to cities/towns do you typically ride?
It really varies, during the week I'm usually in Oklahoma City but on the weekends I'll load up and can travel deep into the boonies.
zero11010 wrote:If you needed to bug out and were to use the contents of this bag to help you, where do you envision going with it?
Should I bug out my plan is to take my car. I have a BOB and a car bag already but the bike can easily be thrown onto the back of the car and used as a secondary form of transportation should I need it.
zero11010 wrote:It's being called a Bob. For a couple of days you absolutely do not NEED to have more than a 5 hr energy drink and a bag of trail mix of unknown size (plus the water you carry). But, it means you're not intending to eat much. I'm curious about the three different lights plus backup batteries. You're planning on an emergency where you don't need much in the way of food, and you don't need any additional materials for warmth or rain, but you do need to have multiple lights available at all times.
Generally for trail riding I don't eat much, the food is more of a snack since it's incredibly difficult to do hard riding on a full stomach.
My current setup is actually two headlights on the bike and a headlamp. I keep the extra as an extra because it's small and compact. Having to do bike repair after dark like changing a tube requires an extreme amount of light. I also have used the additional headlamp as a loaner to other, less prepared riders. Since it's summer, warmth is not a huge concern, being in the upper 90's I'm more concerned with heat stroke then hypothermia. I haven't needed one but adding a poncho is a good idea.
zero11010 wrote:If you're only going to have one knife (which is totally fine) a lot of people really swear by having a fixed blade knife. You can go with an inexpensive mora (less cost than your folder), but a quality (if inexpensive) fixed blade knife will give you more options with your blade than most folding knives.
Really my folder does most of the work I need on my bike. I don't have any chopping needs, just something that can cut the occasional shredded tube.
zero11010 wrote:You may want to consider a sawyer filter over the drops. The sawyer filter system has a bit more versatility.
My water bottles have a Brita filter top so I keep the drops to kill any microbes.
zero11010 wrote:You may want a whistle or some method of attracting audible attention.
Great idea.
zero11010 wrote:You have a handful of bullets, I'm assuming you have a small firearm to use them with?
I use to ride with a HRR but since moving to Oklahoma I've been stopped by police on the trail and hassled so I've stopped carry it. I like to keep a little extra ammo hidden around just encase.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by drop bear » Sun Aug 24, 2014 12:19 am

Don't bikers carry specialised fix it tools?

Rather than the knife?

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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by manowar1313 » Sun Aug 24, 2014 12:26 am

drop bear wrote:Don't bikers carry specialised fix it tools?

Rather than the knife?
Really there's not much on my bike that can't be fixed with an 8.5 mm allen. I know Walmart sells specialized tools but I've never seen anyone carry them.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by majorhavoc » Sun Aug 24, 2014 12:31 am

5 and 6 mm allen wrenches on my bikes. And an 8 and 10 mm wrench. That, a frame pump, patch kit/spare tube and pair of tire levers all but guarantee I can get to my destination.

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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by zero11010 » Sun Aug 24, 2014 4:02 pm

Thanks for the reply! I'll toss out some suggestions that you may find of use.

Usage
If you want your bag to be a bit of everything that basically means you need to prepare for the worst which means having items for long term wilderness survival. I'm not sure if that's a route you want to go. There is an inverse correlation between the skills a person posses and the amount of gear that person will need. This means average citizens require a whole lot of training, or a whole lot of gear to deal with these situations. These situations also nearly never happen to anyone in the country, and I think your chances are better at winning the lottery than making use of a kit like this as it is intended. My suggestion here would be to turn it into a light BoB (24-48 hours instead of the "typical" 72 hour, or a long term wilderness survival bag) and forgo snares/hunting/fishing tools, especially if you are rarely without cell reception or rarely on roads that are infrequently traveled.

Cash
This is what most people in most situations really need (based on the thousands and thousands of people that are displaced by hurricanes, tornadoes, fires, foods, and/or earthquakes every year).

Shelter
What are the temps like at night where you are for the next 6 months? Examine the average temps projected (the historical monthly data for your area is tracked and easy to locate with google). Take those temps and subtract 5 degrees, then prepare for that. Keep in mind that hypothermia is much easier to get than most people think. Wind and moisture are key factors and most people who get it aren't in snowy conditions (a common misconception), and it can occur in 60 degree weather.

I saw a news article years ago where they conducted a test by putting a person in front of an industrial fan and using a garden hose on them. Before the test the person performed simple manual dexterity and mental tests. After 45 minutes of 10mph wind and wetness in a 65 degree room the person tried to do these same tests again and failed terribly. This same piece claimed that the majority of hypothermia cases in the world occur in temperatures well above freezing. I cannot locate this information right now, so just take those specifics as hearsay for now.

You may want to strongly consider a few items for warmth. You may not want all, but a couple would go a long way!
* Poncho (frogg toggs makes a pretty good one, you may not need both a poncho and a jacket, and remember that ponchos aren't likely to breathe)
* Rain and wind proof jacket (poncho may not be needed with this. A lot of these jackets pack down super small these days. You don't have to drop $400 for a top quality breathable wind and water proof jacket.
* Lightweight jacket/sweater for warmth (by using as activity shell for rain/wind and a secondary layer for warmth you have more options available to you than if you just have one heavy weight rain jacket)
* Gloves
* Warm hat (beanie style or whatever your preference is)
* Tarp. A lot of people swear by emergency "space" blankets. These can be very functional but as a layer their results aren't always well understood. A reusable all weather blanket is bulkier than an emergency blanket, but will function as a ground tarp, or a shelter to keep rain off you while still reflecting your heat back at you.
* Some people swear by the uses of a 3mm garbage bag. These can become shelter, or padding, or keep contents dry in a bag. These also take up very little space when packed.
* SOL breathable bivy. I have not personally tested one of these yet. I have tested the two person version which does not breathe in 50 degree temps overnight. It packs smaller but because it doesn't breath you wake up SOAKED and all of your worn layers do, too. If size is critical the smaller non breathable version is an option.
* A bandanna or a shemagh can go a long way toward keeping you cool, keeping you warm, or any of dozens of other uses.
* Socks. A secondary pair of whatever you use while you're riding your bike may be helpful.

You may want to put all of the non rainproof items in a dry bag. Zip lock bags or even a decent garbage bag will work just fine and save you the cost of a $10 dry bag.

Tools
If you're going to be using this as a short duration BoB I would highly suggest you switch out the folding knife for a fixed blade. This will be a lot more durable in case you need to do any wood work or process wood in case you need a fire for warmth/signaling/water purification. If a tarp is your only source of shelter the chances that you will need to make stakes by hand increase and this may be less convenient to do with a folding knife. If you don't have one readily available a $15 Mora (morakniv) knife from amazon will work just fine. The reason for a folding knife over a fixed blade is mostly so it's easier to carry/conceal. If this is going in a pack there is no reason to compromise the durability of the knife to make it more compact, or easier to hide.

You may want a small multi tool. A small inexpensive Squirt PS4 works in a pinch for a lot of the most common needs and sure is tiny and lightweight.

Food
If you intend for this bag to keep you going for a couple of days and the intended usage is while you're out being active burning calories, then you really want to consider more calories in the pack. You can go a couple days without food just fine, but if you're being active during those days you'll be hating life after a day or two. You don't want to ride on a full stomach, which is great (I hate that, too). But, if your bag is your only source of food for the next day and a half you're going to want more than a bag of trail mix (depending on the size of that bag). It doesn't have to be much! But, you may be happy to have 1,000 calories with some sugar, some protein, and some salt. As a side note, last I checked basic power bars suggest eating them with a large quantity of water. So, you may want to ensure that the food you use doesn't really require you to go through a lot of extra water.

I'm not sure how familiar you are with food storage, but the duration that a thing will last and be "good" changes dramatically depending on the conditions in which it is stored. So, if your bike is spending hours a week in the heat with the sun beating down on your pack your food will not last as long as it will in optimal conditions (this goes for almost all kinds of packaged food). Basically all this means you may want to buy things you would normally eat, and will last a few months. Put these in your bag and eat the contents every couple of months then replace with fresh stuff. This doesn't have to be an MRE, or Millennium energy bar, or a coast guard survival brick. Look at wrappers for things you eat. Consider how long they're good for, subtract 30% (that's a made up number to help account for faster degradation of food), then consider if that thing will melt (peanut M&Ms are great, snickers bars less so). You may decide to just carry LOTS of trail mix. For a day or two that certainly won't kill you.

Water
Can you locate the manufacturer information about how effective the filter on your water is? It's common for companies to make general claims about their products but if they don't provide specific examples it's because they legally cannot.

https://www.brita.com/pdf/BB01-UsersGuide.pdf If that is the same water filter you have, then what you have is designed to filter already safe water to make it more palatable. So, your plan is to use this in conjunction with your chemical drops.

There are some filters that can be placed between your camelbak and your water tube to filter dirty water from within your camelbak. This allows you to refill your water container from a creek (using something like a bandanna as a roughly prefilter to remove larger particulate), then drink normally through your hose. The sawyer can be used in this way. The sawyer can also be used with the straw it comes with to drink directly from a river, creek, lake. The drops are good for 20 gallons, the sawyer mini is good for 100,000 gallons (your intended usage won't need very much water), the sawyer also has additional uses. What you have works for your needs! The sawyer is just a little more robust.

Some people will suggest you have a metal container as a source of boiling or pasteurizing water from wilderness settings to make it safe for consumption. For a short duration you will more than likely be fine with just bringing an amount of water, and by having a method of making water safe. If you do want to go with a metal container a Kleen Kanteen (not double walled) works great as both a lightweight container, and a tool to boil water in.

A square foot or two of thick aluminum foil can be used to boil water in a pinch and is both super light weight and small.

An electrolyte powder mix may be worthwhile (like gatorade in powder form or whatever). They help tremendously when in moderate stages of dehydration. It's generally pretty easy to either purchase small containers (single use) sealed up by itself, or dispense an amount into a small zip lock bag. This will help turn regular water into a source for the electrolytes and sugar you need.

Bullets
It sounds like if you're no longer carrying the gun you may not need to bring the ammo.

Fire
You may want a secondary source of starting a fire just in case anything happens to your lighter. This can be some storm matches or a ferro rod or whatever.

It sounds like your only real source of tinder is your hand sanitizer, or maybe alcohol wipes in your first aid kit. That works! But, a small zip lock bag with some dryer lint may help and it has almost no size or weight to it.

Randoms:
* Not sure if some deet would be useful in the area you live in.
* Trash bag for trash

You want to reexamine your pack every few months. That then becomes a good time to replace your shelter items with clothing more suited to the upcoming months, and a great time to eat/replace short term food storage items.


I hope you find a couple of those suggestions useful!

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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by manowar1313 » Sun Aug 24, 2014 9:24 pm

zero11010 wrote:Thanks for the reply! I'll toss out some suggestions that you may find of use.

Usage
If you want your bag to be a bit of everything that basically means you need to prepare for the worst which means having items for long term wilderness survival. I'm not sure if that's a route you want to go. There is an inverse correlation between the skills a person posses and the amount of gear that person will need. This means average citizens require a whole lot of training, or a whole lot of gear to deal with these situations. These situations also nearly never happen to anyone in the country, and I think your chances are better at winning the lottery than making use of a kit like this as it is intended. My suggestion here would be to turn it into a light BoB (24-48 hours instead of the "typical" 72 hour, or a long term wilderness survival bag) and forgo snares/hunting/fishing tools, especially if you are rarely without cell reception or rarely on roads that are infrequently traveled.

Cash
This is what most people in most situations really need (based on the thousands and thousands of people that are displaced by hurricanes, tornadoes, fires, foods, and/or earthquakes every year).

Shelter
What are the temps like at night where you are for the next 6 months? Examine the average temps projected (the historical monthly data for your area is tracked and easy to locate with google). Take those temps and subtract 5 degrees, then prepare for that. Keep in mind that hypothermia is much easier to get than most people think. Wind and moisture are key factors and most people who get it aren't in snowy conditions (a common misconception), and it can occur in 60 degree weather.

I saw a news article years ago where they conducted a test by putting a person in front of an industrial fan and using a garden hose on them. Before the test the person performed simple manual dexterity and mental tests. After 45 minutes of 10mph wind and wetness in a 65 degree room the person tried to do these same tests again and failed terribly. This same piece claimed that the majority of hypothermia cases in the world occur in temperatures well above freezing. I cannot locate this information right now, so just take those specifics as hearsay for now.

You may want to strongly consider a few items for warmth. You may not want all, but a couple would go a long way!
* Poncho (frogg toggs makes a pretty good one, you may not need both a poncho and a jacket, and remember that ponchos aren't likely to breathe)
* Rain and wind proof jacket (poncho may not be needed with this. A lot of these jackets pack down super small these days. You don't have to drop $400 for a top quality breathable wind and water proof jacket.
* Lightweight jacket/sweater for warmth (by using as activity shell for rain/wind and a secondary layer for warmth you have more options available to you than if you just have one heavy weight rain jacket)
* Gloves
* Warm hat (beanie style or whatever your preference is)
* Tarp. A lot of people swear by emergency "space" blankets. These can be very functional but as a layer their results aren't always well understood. A reusable all weather blanket is bulkier than an emergency blanket, but will function as a ground tarp, or a shelter to keep rain off you while still reflecting your heat back at you.
* Some people swear by the uses of a 3mm garbage bag. These can become shelter, or padding, or keep contents dry in a bag. These also take up very little space when packed.
* SOL breathable bivy. I have not personally tested one of these yet. I have tested the two person version which does not breathe in 50 degree temps overnight. It packs smaller but because it doesn't breath you wake up SOAKED and all of your worn layers do, too. If size is critical the smaller non breathable version is an option.
* A bandanna or a shemagh can go a long way toward keeping you cool, keeping you warm, or any of dozens of other uses.
* Socks. A secondary pair of whatever you use while you're riding your bike may be helpful.

You may want to put all of the non rainproof items in a dry bag. Zip lock bags or even a decent garbage bag will work just fine and save you the cost of a $10 dry bag.

Tools
If you're going to be using this as a short duration BoB I would highly suggest you switch out the folding knife for a fixed blade. This will be a lot more durable in case you need to do any wood work or process wood in case you need a fire for warmth/signaling/water purification. If a tarp is your only source of shelter the chances that you will need to make stakes by hand increase and this may be less convenient to do with a folding knife. If you don't have one readily available a $15 Mora (morakniv) knife from amazon will work just fine. The reason for a folding knife over a fixed blade is mostly so it's easier to carry/conceal. If this is going in a pack there is no reason to compromise the durability of the knife to make it more compact, or easier to hide.

You may want a small multi tool. A small inexpensive Squirt PS4 works in a pinch for a lot of the most common needs and sure is tiny and lightweight.

Food
If you intend for this bag to keep you going for a couple of days and the intended usage is while you're out being active burning calories, then you really want to consider more calories in the pack. You can go a couple days without food just fine, but if you're being active during those days you'll be hating life after a day or two. You don't want to ride on a full stomach, which is great (I hate that, too). But, if your bag is your only source of food for the next day and a half you're going to want more than a bag of trail mix (depending on the size of that bag). It doesn't have to be much! But, you may be happy to have 1,000 calories with some sugar, some protein, and some salt. As a side note, last I checked basic power bars suggest eating them with a large quantity of water. So, you may want to ensure that the food you use doesn't really require you to go through a lot of extra water.

I'm not sure how familiar you are with food storage, but the duration that a thing will last and be "good" changes dramatically depending on the conditions in which it is stored. So, if your bike is spending hours a week in the heat with the sun beating down on your pack your food will not last as long as it will in optimal conditions (this goes for almost all kinds of packaged food). Basically all this means you may want to buy things you would normally eat, and will last a few months. Put these in your bag and eat the contents every couple of months then replace with fresh stuff. This doesn't have to be an MRE, or Millennium energy bar, or a coast guard survival brick. Look at wrappers for things you eat. Consider how long they're good for, subtract 30% (that's a made up number to help account for faster degradation of food), then consider if that thing will melt (peanut M&Ms are great, snickers bars less so). You may decide to just carry LOTS of trail mix. For a day or two that certainly won't kill you.

Water
Can you locate the manufacturer information about how effective the filter on your water is? It's common for companies to make general claims about their products but if they don't provide specific examples it's because they legally cannot.

https://www.brita.com/pdf/BB01-UsersGuide.pdf If that is the same water filter you have, then what you have is designed to filter already safe water to make it more palatable. So, your plan is to use this in conjunction with your chemical drops.

There are some filters that can be placed between your camelbak and your water tube to filter dirty water from within your camelbak. This allows you to refill your water container from a creek (using something like a bandanna as a roughly prefilter to remove larger particulate), then drink normally through your hose. The sawyer can be used in this way. The sawyer can also be used with the straw it comes with to drink directly from a river, creek, lake. The drops are good for 20 gallons, the sawyer mini is good for 100,000 gallons (your intended usage won't need very much water), the sawyer also has additional uses. What you have works for your needs! The sawyer is just a little more robust.

Some people will suggest you have a metal container as a source of boiling or pasteurizing water from wilderness settings to make it safe for consumption. For a short duration you will more than likely be fine with just bringing an amount of water, and by having a method of making water safe. If you do want to go with a metal container a Kleen Kanteen (not double walled) works great as both a lightweight container, and a tool to boil water in.

A square foot or two of thick aluminum foil can be used to boil water in a pinch and is both super light weight and small.

An electrolyte powder mix may be worthwhile (like gatorade in powder form or whatever). They help tremendously when in moderate stages of dehydration. It's generally pretty easy to either purchase small containers (single use) sealed up by itself, or dispense an amount into a small zip lock bag. This will help turn regular water into a source for the electrolytes and sugar you need.

Bullets
It sounds like if you're no longer carrying the gun you may not need to bring the ammo.

Fire
You may want a secondary source of starting a fire just in case anything happens to your lighter. This can be some storm matches or a ferro rod or whatever.

It sounds like your only real source of tinder is your hand sanitizer, or maybe alcohol wipes in your first aid kit. That works! But, a small zip lock bag with some dryer lint may help and it has almost no size or weight to it.

Randoms:
* Not sure if some deet would be useful in the area you live in.
* Trash bag for trash

You want to reexamine your pack every few months. That then becomes a good time to replace your shelter items with clothing more suited to the upcoming months, and a great time to eat/replace short term food storage items.


I hope you find a couple of those suggestions useful!
Yea I'm getting some really good ideas.
Really between the allen in my patch kit and my BG mini I think I've got the tool department covered.

Things I've added:
4 pack of AAA batteries (Thought my lights used AA but found out they're AAA)
Bandana
Super glue
Poncho
Wistle
Roadflares
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by Evan the Diplomat » Sun Aug 24, 2014 9:40 pm

You didn't mention if this was a hard tail or full suspension bicycle. I would recommend a rear rack with panniers so you are not carrying everything on your handlebars. That's where you want to mount your rifle like the Rhodesian Selous Scouts motorcycle unit.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by JeeperCreeper » Mon Aug 25, 2014 3:20 am

I think this is a great idea!! I don't know if anyone mentioned this yet, but ever think about one of those little kid bike trailers?? I am thinking of one of those ones you can put 2 kids in and ride them behind your bike if you are a parent.

Advantages:
-sympathy from passerbys (may help prevent violence) in a "regular" bug out situation
-haul a lot of stuff without becoming unstable
-easily ditch weight if you need a fast get aay

Downsides:
-can't do agressive offroading
-may draw attention in Wild West Apocalypse
-lose the trailer, lose a lot of goods

Just a thought, good luck!!
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by NamelessStain » Mon Aug 25, 2014 6:18 am

During WWII, Japan had bicycle infantry and used them to carry supplies during the battle for Malaya.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_infantry
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by AfleetAlex » Mon Aug 25, 2014 3:55 pm

Cycling is the best BO exercise there is. I myself am a 12-20 mile a day, mountain bike cyclist. I recommend a mountain bike over a road bike for training, as its more difficult to make the rotations; allowing you a better workout in a shorter time span.

Consider getting a road bike to BO on. You'll need all your energy for exiting the area. Check out the newer Kevlar tires. I had to start using them because I was blowing several tires a month. Havent blown a tire since. Those would protect a road bike from whatever terrain you rode on.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by drop bear » Mon Aug 25, 2014 10:59 pm

JeeperCreeper wrote:I think this is a great idea!! I don't know if anyone mentioned this yet, but ever think about one of those little kid bike trailers?? I am thinking of one of those ones you can put 2 kids in and ride them behind your bike if you are a parent.

Advantages:
-sympathy from passerbys (may help prevent violence) in a "regular" bug out situation
-haul a lot of stuff without becoming unstable
-easily ditch weight if you need a fast get aay

Downsides:
-can't do agressive offroading
-may draw attention in Wild West Apocalypse
-lose the trailer, lose a lot of goods

Just a thought, good luck!!
Depends on how far you want to go with it.

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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by manowar1313 » Mon Sep 01, 2014 2:57 pm

JeeperCreeper wrote:I think this is a great idea!! I don't know if anyone mentioned this yet, but ever think about one of those little kid bike trailers?? I am thinking of one of those ones you can put 2 kids in and ride them behind your bike if you are a parent.

Advantages:
-sympathy from passerbys (may help prevent violence) in a "regular" bug out situation
-haul a lot of stuff without becoming unstable
-easily ditch weight if you need a fast get aay

Downsides:
-can't do agressive offroading
-may draw attention in Wild West Apocalypse
-lose the trailer, lose a lot of goods

Just a thought, good luck!!
I did have a wagon, I used it when I was a kid to haul mowers around on my bike.

Image

I don't think with my current bug out plan a bicycle wagon would help. The bike is good because I can easily load it to the back of the car. It straps on in about 5 seconds, the wagon wouldn't fit in the car and I'd just leave it behind.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by TacAir » Mon Sep 01, 2014 3:06 pm

JeeperCreeper wrote:I think this is a great idea!! I don't know if anyone mentioned this yet, but ever think about one of those little kid bike trailers?? I am thinking of one of those ones you can put 2 kids in and ride them behind your bike if you are a parent.

Advantages:
-sympathy from passerbys (may help prevent violence) in a "regular" bug out situation
-haul a lot of stuff without becoming unstable
-easily ditch weight if you need a fast get aay

Downsides:
-can't do agressive offroading
-may draw attention in Wild West Apocalypse
-lose the trailer, lose a lot of goods

Just a thought, good luck!!
Like this?

Image

The set of panniers carry more than an ALICE Large ruck BTW.
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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by JeeperCreeper » Mon Sep 01, 2014 11:46 pm

TacAir wrote:
JeeperCreeper wrote:I think this is a great idea!! I don't know if anyone mentioned this yet, but ever think about one of those little kid bike trailers?? I am thinking of one of those ones you can put 2 kids in and ride them behind your bike if you are a parent.

Advantages:
-sympathy from passerbys (may help prevent violence) in a "regular" bug out situation
-haul a lot of stuff without becoming unstable
-easily ditch weight if you need a fast get aay

Downsides:
-can't do agressive offroading
-may draw attention in Wild West Apocalypse
-lose the trailer, lose a lot of goods

Just a thought, good luck!!
Like this?

Image

The set of panniers carry more than an ALICE Large ruck BTW.

Yep! That's exactly what I was thinking. Put some decoy children in there and you're set!!!!
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Halfapint wrote:There are some exceptions like myself and jeepercreeper.... but we are the forum asshats. We protect our positions with gusto
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Her secondary offense will be nagging.

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Re: Bicycle BOB

Post by manowar1313 » Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:16 am

Here's the updated bike bag and pics of the bike.
Things I had before:
The bag has a 2L Camelback type bladder.
A tire repair kit also a spare tube for my bike (Not shown).
Cheap knife and lighter.
Water tablets and hand sanitizer.
Basic first aid kit (Blue) and sunblock.
Flashlight and 2 headlamps.
5 Hr energy that I ripped the label off of.
25 rounds of .22 and 30 ft of 550 para.

Things I've added so far:
Burner phone.
Bandana
Electrical tape
Tuna packets
Extra socks
A larger multitool
A GI poncho
A flask of "mouth wash" *No open container issues or DUI bicycling nonsense.
Whistle/compass

I'm not sure if I like the poncho. I think it gives of a homeless vibe so I may get a different one instead.

Image
Image
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