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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 2:48 am 
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I have some vision issues that cause some difficulties with reading. So sitting down and reading a book is a serious chore. Generally the reading I do is online and just smallish chunks of text. Multi page articles tend to be a problem. But it seems that I should do more reading. I don't know if this is like a muscle; where the more I use it the better it gets. But it's worth a shot. Growing up I rarely read the books assigned in school. The notable exceptions were survival and SHTF themed books. In 6th grade we read Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain. I really enjoyed both of those. Especially since throughout most of the book the only person was the main character. A situation like that is paradise for an autistic person. In high school the books that stand out are [url]Alas Babylon[/url] and to a lesser extent [url]Never Cry Wolf[/url]. Since SHTF/Survival themed novels are the books I managed to get through and enjoy; those seem like a natural choice. I figured this would be a good place to get some recommendations for good SHTF/Survival themed novels. So I would appreciate any and all sugestions. Is [url]World War Z[/url] worth reading?

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 4:36 am 
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You might want to look through the thread "Several must read SCi-fi based Apocalyptic novels" https://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=92879 which has a lot of good recommendations.

Like Lucifer's Hammer or The Postman (very different from the Costner movie)

Or my suggestion

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What I am very surprised to see no one mention yet is

Earth Abides by George R. Stewart
Image


Earth Abides is a 1949 post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by American writer George R. Stewart. It tells the story of the fall of civilization from deadly disease and its rebirth. Beginning in the United States in the 1940s, it deals with Isherwood "Ish" Williams, Emma, and the community they founded. The survivors live off the remains of the old world, while learning to adapt to the new. Along the way they are forced to make tough decisions and choose what kind of civilization they will rebuild.

Earth Abides won the inaugural International Fantasy Award in 1951. It was included in Locus Magazine's list of best All Time Science Fiction in 1987 and 1998 and was a nominee to be entered into the Prometheus Hall Of Fame. In November 1950, it was adapted for the CBS radio program Escape as a two-part drama starring John Dehner.

The book earned much praise from James Sallis, writing in 2003 in the Boston Globe:

This is a book, mind you, that I'd place not only among the greatest science fiction but among our very best novels. Each time I read it, I'm profoundly affected, affected in a way only the greatest art — Ulysses, Matisse or Beethoven symphonies, say — affects me. Epic in sweep, centering on the person of Isherwood Williams, Earth Abides proves a kind of antihistory, relating the story of humankind backwards, from ever-more-abstract civilization to stone-age primitivism. Everything passes — everything. Writers' reputations. The ripe experience of a book in which we find ourselves immersed. Star systems, worlds, states, individual lives. Humankind. Few of us get to read our own eulogies, but here is mankind's. Making Earth Abides a novel for which words like elegiac and transcendent come easily to mind, a novel bearing, in critic Adam-Troy Castro's words, "a great dark beauty."


It is an amazing book and one that really should be read by any prepper. While written long ago it is still quite relevant to what might be the future of humanity. I agree with James Sallis in thinking this is one of the great books. It is one that reaches in to the core of the reader.


There are definitely some great books out there with the topic of SHTF or PAW that are well worth reading.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 7:30 am 
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ineffableone wrote:
You might want to look through the thread "Several must read SCi-fi based Apocalyptic novels" https://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=92879 which has a lot of good recommendations.

Like Lucifer's Hammer or The Postman (very different from the Costner movie)



Thanks for the suggestions. I was curious about Lucifer's hammer.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:13 am 
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PM

Do you use audio books? I started out using them as a way to 'read' while doing other things but have switched over to them almost exclusively. Audible always has some kind of promotion going on and there are tons of books in the public domain. Our local library has a program where they install an app on your portable device and let you 'check out' ebooks and audio books for two weeks at a time. They have purchased every book we've ever asked them to get for us.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 12:05 pm 
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Purple_Mutant wrote:
ineffableone wrote:
You might want to look through the thread "Several must read SCi-fi based Apocalyptic novels" https://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=92879 which has a lot of good recommendations.

Like Lucifer's Hammer or The Postman (very different from the Costner movie)



Thanks for the suggestions. I was curious about Lucifer's hammer.


Lucifer's Hammer is pretty good, and it brings up a lot of topics that are really good to think about. I won't go into details as I don't want to spoil it for you, but there is multiple different view points and ways different groups try and survive that illustrates several different paths people can take in such a disaster event and how they may play out. *edit to add (considering your preference for following a single character, this might not be the best choice for you to start with as it follows several characters rather than just one)

The Postman like I said is a big departure from the movie. And is much more in depth. The one downside is the author made "survivalists" into the stereotypical white supremacist militaristic militia types. He has made numerous apologies since writing it about that, pointing out that at the time of writing it that sort of "survivalism" was rampant in the news, but he admits that it paints a poor picture of survivalist who mostly don't fit that stereotype. If you can ignore that I would recommend it highly as a good story with lots of interesting info in it.

Earth Abides is my favorite by far. It goes into a lot of things that just don't get covered as it is more about the transition from the current world into the PAW. There are no exceptional people with outlandish skills or knowledge. It really feels like just a random collection of survivors and their struggles to survive after the collapse of their world. It is a little outdated due to being so old, but that doesn't stop it from having a lot of great info. Maybe even due to being older actually having some info that is more useful as it is from a time when people still remembered how to live simpler. Oh and your mention of liking following a single main character fits with this story as it really follows one single character through the entire story.

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Last edited by ineffableone on Mon Feb 15, 2016 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 12:16 pm 
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Tunnel in the Sky, an early RAH juvenal book, it is all about survival - on a distant planet, with little gear.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 5:11 pm 
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KYZHunters wrote:
PM

Do you use audio books? I started out using them as a way to 'read' while doing other things but have switched over to them almost exclusively. Audible always has some kind of promotion going on and there are tons of books in the public domain. Our local library has a program where they install an app on your portable device and let you 'check out' ebooks and audio books for two weeks at a time. They have purchased every book we've ever asked them to get for us.


I haven't really gotten into audio books. I am looking to do more actual reading to (hopefully) strengthen my ability to read. If there is a major disaster; audio stuff may not be viable. Whereas the written word will still be. So I want to put together a library of books with useful info. But it doesn't do me much good to have all that info if I can't properly digest it.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 11:24 pm 
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Check out "The Remaining series by D.J. Molles". Pretty quick reads that keep the reader involved/interested. Font and spacing wise, it is average to above average so visually it might be easy to get through.

Another good series is the "Survivalist Series" by Dr. Bradley. Generous font and spacing so it might be a good paperback option to get started on. Super fast but entertaining read that is kinda like a apocalypse western with SHTF trivia thrown in.




Ever think about doing electronic readers where you can adjust the literature to your preference?

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 11:32 pm 
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Lost On A Mountain in Maine - Donn Felder the true story of a boy who got lost on a mountain in Maine, lots of lessons on what to do and not do.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 12:02 am 
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I have never really been into books on tape. I can’t explain it since I enjoy good discussions or stories told on the radio. There are some exceptions, for me, such as C.S. Lewis reading his own words but mostly I do not like it. I do not seem to be able to create the images as well when someone else is doing the reading and if I know that voice has no real experience with what is being said I find it hard to accept it. Rash Limburger talking about courage bothers me. Still, you asked about novels and since someone else pointed you to the link where it is discussed I thought to offer a link that offers something even though I mostly disagree with “best” and “of all time” being used as qualifiers. All five of these I recommend:
http://www.therichest.com/expensive-lifestyle/entertainment/the-5-best-post-apocalyptic-stories-of-all-time/

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 4:47 am 
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JeeperCreeper wrote:
Check out "The Remaining series by D.J. Molles". Pretty quick reads that keep the reader involved/interested. Font and spacing wise, it is average to above average so visually it might be easy to get through.

Another good series is the "Survivalist Series" by Dr. Bradley. Generous font and spacing so it might be a good paperback option to get started on. Super fast but entertaining read that is kinda like a apocalypse western with SHTF trivia thrown in.




Ever think about doing electronic readers where you can adjust the literature to your preference?


The problem isn't really font size. I have some issues with binocular vision. Brain doesn't combine the image from both eyes. So I can't properly see in 3d. No 3d movies for me :( If I am reading something there comes a point where my brain just gets tired and says "fuck this I quit". From there my eyes will read the words but my brain isn't absorbing any meaning from them. I also have some mild dyslexia. So I flip letters on unfamiliar words. For the LONGEST time I thought that instrument was insturment. I flipped the U and R. Sometimes my vision gets blurry as well. I could probably get some glasses; but I don't like wearing them. Although I have been tempted to get a monocle.There is a place here in San Francisco that does prescription monocles. Since I have binocular vision issues there isn't much point in having a lens over both eyes. Besides that; monocles are kinda cool. For some minor distance vision issues I always carry a monocular. At this point I am resisting getting glasses until I absolutely need to have them. That said; I should see if my insurance covers them. I wonder if they would cover a monocle? If anyone is interested; here is the company that sells monocles.

http://www.nearsights.com/

They also have tactical monocles for reading. I suspect these could also double as fire starters.

http://www.nearsights.com/collections/ruggedized-tactical-magnifiers

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 11:07 am 
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World War Z is pretty good, not great, but an easy read. The accompaning Zombie survival guide by Max Brooks is an amusing read.

I'm current going through "One Second After" (audio book) which is shaping up to be one of the better TEOTWAWKI novels.

James Patterson has the Maximum Ride series of young adult sci-fi books. They read a lot like Louie L'Amour novels, and span the apocalypse..

Most libraries have a large print section. If you're having some trouble with the normal 10 point font, the large print books may be more comfortable to read.

EDIT: Steven King's "The Stand". Good, evil, and one heck of a head cold.


Last edited by Close_enough on Tue Feb 16, 2016 3:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 2:44 pm 
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My two favorite SHTF books are strangely written by the same guy...

1. The Jakarta Pandemic -What happens when a bad cold blows through. The main character has some neat do-dads but the story has a very realistic feel
2. The Perseid Collapse -Same characters as the above. Less emphasis on reality but still a very fun read. (None of the follow-up/fan novels were as good)

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I think you ought to check out Day By Day Armageddon. At least check it out :)

http://www.amazon.com/Day-Armageddon-J- ... armageddon

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 6:56 pm 
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Nearly every one reads this in their early years:

LORD of the FLIES - AUDIO

Some of the psychology plays out in this thought experiment, as well.

Stanford Prisoner Exchange

If it is easier for you to listen then it is simply a matter of a little Boolean trickery for engines to take you where you want to go.
For example, Surviving Forever W/O a Handcuff Key on your Paracord Bracelet or a Picture of a New Sleeping bag

Tunnel in the Sky is an excellent individual SF story. It's what started me down the Heinlein path, which, by the way, seems always to focus on the ability of one man (soldier, realtor, doctor, student, prisoner, etc.) to save the world without any need for any higher power. (Like Rand, R.H.'s atheism is demonstrated through what is not said.)

Look, I suspect that the two of us have very little in common but since you asked about reading recommendations it is likely that I would walk quite a distance with you and share a few bowls of squirrel stew. I cannot say that I am smart about autism but my family talked me into watching Temple Grandin in 2010 and I thought it was the best movie I saw that year. That lady should fascinate anyone with a passion for learning and the ability to sidestep those who say "no."

And books are an important part of my surviving.

Don't know your age, but I am coming to the conclusion that some of the best survival books were classics I read very early in life. Robinson Crusoe, The Swiss Family Robinson, and Treasure Island are all available as free downloads.
"Enders Game" is SF but an exceptional read for any age. People that do not like to read like it.
I noticed the words "natural choice." Anything by Allan W. Eckert is highly recommended: Wild Season follows everything in the circle of life from that creature's point of view. The Incident at Hawks Hill finds a kid surviving on his own. His list is incredible and all about survival :

Allan W. Eckert (Anyone that has lived in the Ohio River valley should try The Frontiersman, by the way.)

In 2014 I was away a lot and always had a book. I went back through things I had read earlier in life with a 'nature' theme and found that all of them were about survival. Like "the Road," by Cormac McCarthy, this one received the Pulitzer Prize in fiction. What a great story teller:

Survival

Man vs. self. Man vs. man. Man vs. nature. Conflict and survival.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 11:31 pm 
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Since you started this off talking about YA books, how about if I add to that list! I'm in my 40s and have no qualms about saying that I read and enjoy YA stuff right alongside "serious adult books." I went in the other room and dug out some YA books that I have with similar themes and I'll list them below. I'm sure there are many more (some of them have already been mentioned here), but here are a few of mine.

You probably know that both Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain had a number of sequels. I haven't read them, so I can't speak to how good they are, but they're out there. Each book is part of a series of five, although the last two for the Mountain series are apparently just short, picture books.

Both of those books won Newbery Honors awards, so how about two Newbery Winners:
Call it Courage by Armstrong Sperry (http://amzn.com/141695368X) - Boy sails to a deserted island and survives there before heading home
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O'Dell (http://amzn.com/0547328613) - Based on a true story about a young girl who is left behind when her village is forced to leave the island they live on

Others from my collection:
Pilot Down, Presumed Dead by Marjorie Phleger (http://amzn.com/0982327102) - A pilot crash lands on an island off the Baja Penninsula and must survive on his own
The Grizzly by Annabel & Edgar Johnson (http://amzn.com/B000NPQ1OG) - A boy goes camping with his father where their truck becomes disabled and his father injured by a bear
Fire-Hunter by Jim Kjelgaard (http://amzn.com/B000I1NF6C) - Set in prehistoric times, a man who is left behind by his tribe must survive by inventing new weapons and coming up with new ideas
Wild Trek by Jim Kjelgaard (http://amzn.com/055315687X) - A hunter/trapper sets out to rescue two men lost in the wilderness
Deathwatch by Robb White (http://amzn.com/0440917409) - A college student / hunting guide is betrayed by a client and must survive as he becomes the hunted
Endurance / Shackleton's Valiant Voyage by Alfred Lansing (http://amzn.com/0465062881 / http://amzn.com/B000NPUMTQ) - Full version / abridged for YA - The true story of Earnest Shackleton's failed attempt to cross Antarctica

There are many other books that have aspects of survival in them (Blind Flight and Emergency 10-33 on Channel 11, both by Hilary Milton, or dystopian futures like This Time of Darkness by H.M. Hoover or The Missing Persons League by Frank Bonham). There are also books about pioneer times, like the Laura Ingalls Wilder "Little House" books, that give a fair amount of detail to what it was like living in those days. And there are countless books about true stories of survival during wars, at sea, in the woods, etc., etc.

Personally, I think it's important to read a variety of books (fiction and non-fiction), just because various viewpoints and concepts can help you to learn to think critically. Memorable books can also make random pieces of information stick in your head. Dave Barry Slept Here: A Sort of History of the United States might be a ridiculous humor book, but because of the absurdist take on US history, some snippets of real history stayed with me! The All Creatures Great and Small books by James Herriott caused various medical/veterinarian terms to stick too.

I may come back later and list some additional, non-YA books as well, but right now I'm tired and need to go to bed!


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2016 4:52 am 
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Thanks EBuff75. I didn't know that Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain had sequels. I am interested in young adult books since they are easier to read. I am interested in reading survival/SHTF books since they are the ones that captivated me enough to finish them. Other books might have interesting info; but are of little use if I can get through them. I am mainly wanted to get into reading to see if that improves my ability to read. If I end up in a situation where I HAVE to read something because it's important. I want to make sure I can finish it and properly absorb the information.

*EDIT*

I just looked up Island of the Blue Dolphins. That looks right up my alley. It's sort in the same vein as Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain in that it involves a kid surviving alone. I like that the protagonist in this one is a girl. I think I will have to see if my local library has it.

Thanks again for the suggestion.

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I queried my daughters and their responses initially pointed to the natural world as well. Like me, they had to memorize the Law of the Jungle by the age of 10. http://www.literatureproject.com/jungle-book/

Now this is the Law of the Jungle --
as old and as true as the sky;
And the Wolf that shall keep it may prosper,
but the Wolf that shall break it must die.


Here are few others they agreed upon:

The Girl with All the Gifts
Hunger Games series
Divergent series
Parable of the Sower
The Handmaid’s Tale
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series
Oryx and Cake
Cat’s Cradle
The Desert and the Blade

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