GoRuck Pistol Class Review - Counter Vehicle Ambush

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GoRuck Pistol Class Review - Counter Vehicle Ambush

Post by the_alias » Wed Jul 31, 2019 4:16 pm

AAR GoRuck Advanced Pistol - Counter Ambush


This class built on the lessons from the Active Shooter. We had 12 shooters, 10 from day 1 and 2 new shooters. We started the day going over safety briefing again and inserting barrel plugs.


Gear note: I shot my Glock 19 today borrowing the Cadres own design holster. Good holster, rides much higher than my standard IWB one and has a more positive reinforcement. Am tempted to pick one up. I felt I shot as well with my Glock as the CZ and I did not have any slide lock issues.

Dry Fire


We started out doing draw and move and engage drills. We then added in a move to a kneeling position. We also added in a reload. Then the final evolution of the group drills like this was a drill where you work in pairs. 1 person stands opposite and uses their hand to signal numbers. The other person is listening to commands, Draw, fire, magazine and performing reloads (tap rack) as well as shouting out the numbers indicated by their partner. The idea being to help improve multi-tasking and make tap-rack reloads automatic behavior. A good drill to do with a buddy for the future. We also covered movement with the gun, edges of feet, low centre of gravity, low ready position scanning.


From here we then moved to the vehicle portion of the dry fire practice. The Cadre set up the car facing the targets and the first drill was how to engage from either Driver or Passenger seat and exit the vehicle and continue the engagement. Vehicles are bullet traps and if you can't drive to escape this is the option. On the driver side the key take aways were: drive forward to expose your gun if carrying at 3-5 oclock. Then drive back with feet on brake and dead pedal and start shooting. Left hand then comes to chest, finds belt and drives down to unlock. Left hand opens door and with left food PIN the door open so it doesn't bounce back on you. Then exit, reloading whilst you do and re-engage. Passenger side was similar but with some added complications: the draw is more difficult. Getting the belt off requires bringing pistol in and moving the seatbelt around the gun. Exiting is the same procedure.


The next dry fire drills were with the car side on to targets and talked about how to use a car as cover. We also went over how whilst a car isn't technically cover most people instinctively shoot at what they can see before they realize they can put rounds through a barrier. Engine block, disc brakes all great places. We did dry fire drills on moving to the car and positioning from the open. Kneeling isn't as easy for me and Cadre made point if I am standing and bent to keep head covered and arms back off the hood.


Next dry fire drill was about engaging as the driver one handed whilst exiting with an attack on the side. Right hand shooting, left hand driving into steering wheel and exting. Always important to face the direction of the threat. We added a component of a passenger behind the driver here, they would exit and draw once our of the vehicle and engage. Here was another lesson in the importance of BEING LOUD and communication "move, move, move" - keeping up a good rate of fire whilst the other is moving. Like most people my classmates had a lot of trouble being loud enough which I badgered them a lot about.


The final evolution of dry-fire drills was a 4 man team procedure to exit the car under fire. The front passenger engages whilst rear exit and driver exits. Once covering fire is coming from rear and front the front passenger slides his butt and legs over the console and exits in a more complicated manner. Reload and then engage. From here we also worked moving to different positions and again concept of covering people on the move.


Live Fire


After cold start which I did well in we did a few transition drills - standing to kneeling, combat reloads etc. We then brought the car back. The car was a rental so we had strict orders not to shoot it. We then began to run live fire versions of everything we did before. This was a great way to teach and progress through. We shot a lot more and I really enjoyed this portion of the class. My biggest challenge was remembering to reload with left thumb hitting slide release and classmates communicating properly.


Things get infintely louder with live fire in the car and it really became important for people to communicate to keep up the rate of fire. I do think the Cadre could have stopped and spelled this concept out a bit more to some people. That overwhelming fire response is going to help get you out of this situation and rounds need to be going constantly whilst team mates are moving. The personal instruction and comments I received were again positive bar Cadre Machine barking at me about my reload one time.


This class was excellent progression of how to use basic fire fundamentals to do more complex things like fight your way out of a vehicle ambush and exit your vehicle whilst laying down fire.

Bonus media:

I got one video of me exiting the live fire drill of passenger engagement.
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