Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by NT2C » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:50 pm

woodsghost wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 5:55 pm
NT2C wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:54 pm
flybynight wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:44 am
Saw this as a ad before a youtube video

Am I the only one cringing seeing steel being shot at what seems like too close range?
I would suspect they are shooting frangible ammo. It turns to powder when it hits steel.
Likely so. Still makes me cringe though.
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Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by NT2C » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:59 pm

After the statement by <redacted for politics> concerning ARs and Aks, I am so looking forward to the Black Rifle Friday sales this holiday shopping season. :awesome:
Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto

Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by boskone » Fri Sep 13, 2019 10:12 pm

NT2C wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:59 pm
After the statement by <redacted for politics> concerning ARs and Aks, I am so looking forward to the Black Rifle Friday sales this holiday shopping season. :awesome:
After sundry such comments, I want to get a custom lower labelled "!AR-15".

("!" is often used in programming as a negation operator, so the "model" would read roughly "Not (an) AR-15".)

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by JeeperCreeper » Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:18 am

I really want this "space force" Mars edition plate carrier

https://www.ar500armor.com/mars-testudo ... =affiliate
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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by Stercutus » Sat Sep 14, 2019 9:09 am

JeeperCreeper wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:18 am
I really want this "space force" Mars edition plate carrier

https://www.ar500armor.com/mars-testudo ... =affiliate
I must admit that is very handsome. However you can get plates and carrier for less than that on optics planet, with enough left over to buy pouches.
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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by moab » Sat Sep 14, 2019 11:45 am

Stercutus wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 9:09 am
JeeperCreeper wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:18 am
I really want this "space force" Mars edition plate carrier

https://www.ar500armor.com/mars-testudo ... =affiliate
I must admit that is very handsome. However you can get plates and carrier for less than that on optics planet, with enough left over to buy pouches.
Looks like a joke. But who would pay $300 for a joke? Maybe Carlos Mencia? Nah. He'd just steal it. ;)
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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:40 pm


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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by woodsghost » Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:24 pm

:ooh:
Could you give us a few hints? It seems to be behind a pay wall.
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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by Stercutus » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:09 pm

woodsghost wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:24 pm
:ooh:
Could you give us a few hints? It seems to be behind a pay wall.
Mine goes to the Iowa - Iowa State Game which means we won't hear until after 6. But the old link says something about Hy Vee allowing open carry, the article itself seems to be gone.
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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by RickOShea » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:34 pm

So I panicked a little bit last night. :crazy:

Last month I picked-up a CZ-75. Its the SP-01 model, and it came with a couple of 18 round mags with extended bases. At the same time I ordered a couple of Mec-Gar 17 round flush mags and a couple of Mec-Gar 19 rounders with extended basepads, just to try-out. I liked the flush mags and figured I'd order a few moar of those...when I got around to it.

Last night I figured I'd best place an order, JIC. I went back to Bud's, since they were the cheapest at $20 a piece....Out of stock. I checked a couple other sites that had them for $21 just a couple weeks ago, now also out-of-stock. I did an SKU search. Results from the first couple pages were also out-of-stock, or they wanted $25 to $30 per mag. Gotdayummit.

Finally I landed on Tombstone's site. I've ordered from them before, but that was a few years ago. They had six flush Mec-Gars in-stock for $22, so I cleaned them out....Hopefully I didn't just start the next panic. :rofl:
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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by RickOShea » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:40 pm

JeeperCreeper wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:18 am
I really want this "space force" Mars edition plate carrier

https://www.ar500armor.com/mars-testudo ... =affiliate
Do they make one in the regular Space Force battle dress pattern? :ooh:




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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by Stercutus » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:41 pm

I don't think the panic will start for reals until August 2020. That is when all politicians will be checking the wind with a finger to come up with their latest and greatest views.
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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Sep 14, 2019 5:01 pm

woodsghost wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:24 pm
:ooh:
Could you give us a few hints? It seems to be behind a pay wall.
Here is a snippet:
Will Iowa companies like Hy-Vee and Casey's restrict guns as national retailers change rules?

Linh Ta, Des Moines Register Published 7:17 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019 | Updated 7:54 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019

While an increasing number of national retailers are asking customers to conceal their firearms or leave them at home, in Iowa, it's business as usual
for some of the state’s largest companies.

After a mass shooting in August at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart that left 22 people dead, the national spotlight fell to shopping venues, as activists on both sides of the issue debated whether firearms belong where people buy groceries or school supplies.

The debate won't stop anytime soon.

As younger generations make spending decisions, in part, on companies' positions on issues such as climate change and LGBTQ rights, more brands
will take stances, said Anne Brouwer, partner at retail consulting firm McMillan Doolittle in Chicago.

Hy-Vee, one of Iow a’s most prominent retailers w ith over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follow s state law s, meaning there are no
company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

After the El Paso shootings, Walmart said it would no longer sell certain ammunition and discouraged customers from openly carrying firearms in its
stores.

Kroger, CVS, Walgreens, Aldi and Meijer followed suit.

The Des Moines Register asked four major Iowa-based retailers to comment on their firearms policies, if they have them.

Under Iowa law (https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IC/ ... er.724.pdf), gun owners with a permit to carry weapons may conceal- or opencarry
a firearm. Open-carry allows for publicly visible firearms, typically in a holster, while conceal-carry requires that firearms be out of sight. The state
has designated weapons-free zones that include schools.

Hy-Vee, one of Iowa’s most prominent retailers with over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follows state laws, meaning there are
no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

But if customers see someone in a store who makes them uncomfortable, Hy-Vee spokesperson Tina Potthoff encouraged them to reach out to
customer service to talk to management or security, she said in a statement.

“The safety and security of our customers and employees is paramount,” Potthoff's statement said.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, has a similar policy.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, follow s state laws, meaning there are no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't want to comment. Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated
Register requests about whether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Phone calls to five Casey's and five Fareway stores in the Des Moines metro showed variations in what store representatives tell callers about whether
firearms can be brought into their stores.

The Register did not identify itself as a news organization when calling the stores. Instead, to get a sense of what store representatives tell members of
the public, a reporter called the store, asked for a manager, and asked whether firearms were allowed in the store.

Three Fareway stores' employees said their stores allow legal permit holders to open- or conceal-carry but have no independent policies beyond that.
A fourth store's employee said customers could conceal-carry with a permit, but not open-carry. And an employee at a fifth store was unsure of the
policy and directed questions to Fareway corporate.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't w ant to comment on their firearms policies. Customer service representatives at two Casey's stores told callers they preferred it if no firearms were brought inside, while two others said they follow state laws and allow legal firearms. A representative from a fifth store said customers are allowed to conceal-carry, but not open-carry.

Amber Gustafson, a prominent local Democrat and member of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a gun-control organization, spoke out
on social media regarding Hy-Vee allowing open-carry in its stores.

Gustafson told the Register she used to regularly shop at the Ankeny Hy-Vee in Prairie Trail until she spoke with a manager about whether or not the
store allows open-carry. After learning that Hy-Vee allows it, she said she stopped shopping there and goes to Walmart instead.

But Richard Rogers, a board member of the Iowa Firearms Coalition, a gun advocacy group, praised Hy-Vee. He said he's glad to hear the company is
still allowing legal gun owners to carry their firearms within its stores.

Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated Register requests about w hether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Potthoff said Hy-Vee has had no issues with allowing firearms in its stores.

Gustafson's family owns guns, she said, but she doesn’t feel safe if people around her are openly carrying firearms. She said she would be too
concerned for the safety of her children to approach a manager with her concerns.

High school students make up a good share of grocery store workers across the state. Gustafson said she worries for teens being in a store that allows
open-carry. She worries more that someone will accidentally discharge a firearm than she worries about a mass shooting.

“We don’t know if they have ill intent until they pull a trigger," Gustafson said. "Should I leave? Should I stay? What’s going to go down?”

Every day, Iowans are around people with firearms in stores — they just don't realize it, Rogers said.

He cautions companies to not “sway” to the lobbying efforts of political organizations.

Rogers said open carry isn't common to see in urban areas like Des Moines, but in rural Iowa, people working outside with a firearm to protect
themselves may walk into a Casey's to grab coffee or food.

No one in his group is calling for a boycott of Walmart, he said, but gun advocates may feel less inclined to shop in stores that restrict legal firearms.
Walmart may be asking law-abiding gun owners to leave their firearms at home, but that does nothing to prevent someone with ill intentions, he said.

“In Iowa, a merchant is free to put up any policy they want," Rogers said. "Our people would respect that and choose to go somewhere else."

As a practice, businesses try to avoid controversies that could damage the brand or offend consumers, Brouwer said.

But studies have shown that younger consumers expect companies to take a stand, and are more inclined to spend their money at businesses that
support issues that are important to them. On the flip side, older consumers are less focused on social issues when choosing where to shop, Brouwer
said.

Companies may face immediate backlash if they take a stance on an issue, but in the long run, it could help a company's branding, Brouwer said.

Financially, it’s too early to see if any of these changes will have benefits for Walmart or the other companies that followed suit.

Dick’s Sporting Goods, which has been a vocal supporter of gun-control legislation, has seen shares climb since mid-August, when it removed the
hunting category from 125 stores. It's the latest in a series of moves the chain has taken in the past two years to step back from firearm sales, a
decision that initially hurt its bottom line.

Brouwer expects more companies to take stances on social issues in the next five years as millennials get older and gain more buying power in the
market. She said companies will have to move beyond making statements as younger generations look for more action.

“Their behaviors will influence companies,” Brouwer said. “It’s harder for brands to hide behind playing it safe because sometimes that’s not a good
decision.”

Linh Ta covers retail for the Register. Reach her at lta@dmreg.com (mailto:lta@dmreg.com) or 515-284-8198.

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by NT2C » Sat Sep 14, 2019 6:10 pm

RickOShea wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:40 pm
JeeperCreeper wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:18 am
I really want this "space force" Mars edition plate carrier

https://www.ar500armor.com/mars-testudo ... =affiliate
Do they make one in the regular Space Force battle dress pattern? :ooh:




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The "uniform, dress, summer" for those identifying as female is pretty cute I think.

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Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by woodsghost » Sat Sep 14, 2019 8:16 pm

MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 5:01 pm
woodsghost wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:24 pm
:ooh:
Could you give us a few hints? It seems to be behind a pay wall.
Here is a snippet:
Will Iowa companies like Hy-Vee and Casey's restrict guns as national retailers change rules?

Linh Ta, Des Moines Register Published 7:17 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019 | Updated 7:54 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019

While an increasing number of national retailers are asking customers to conceal their firearms or leave them at home, in Iowa, it's business as usual
for some of the state’s largest companies.

After a mass shooting in August at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart that left 22 people dead, the national spotlight fell to shopping venues, as activists on both sides of the issue debated whether firearms belong where people buy groceries or school supplies.

The debate won't stop anytime soon.

As younger generations make spending decisions, in part, on companies' positions on issues such as climate change and LGBTQ rights, more brands
will take stances, said Anne Brouwer, partner at retail consulting firm McMillan Doolittle in Chicago.

Hy-Vee, one of Iow a’s most prominent retailers w ith over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follow s state law s, meaning there are no
company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

After the El Paso shootings, Walmart said it would no longer sell certain ammunition and discouraged customers from openly carrying firearms in its
stores.

Kroger, CVS, Walgreens, Aldi and Meijer followed suit.

The Des Moines Register asked four major Iowa-based retailers to comment on their firearms policies, if they have them.

Under Iowa law (https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IC/ ... er.724.pdf), gun owners with a permit to carry weapons may conceal- or opencarry
a firearm. Open-carry allows for publicly visible firearms, typically in a holster, while conceal-carry requires that firearms be out of sight. The state
has designated weapons-free zones that include schools.

Hy-Vee, one of Iowa’s most prominent retailers with over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follows state laws, meaning there are
no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

But if customers see someone in a store who makes them uncomfortable, Hy-Vee spokesperson Tina Potthoff encouraged them to reach out to
customer service to talk to management or security, she said in a statement.

“The safety and security of our customers and employees is paramount,” Potthoff's statement said.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, has a similar policy.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, follow s state laws, meaning there are no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't want to comment. Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated
Register requests about whether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Phone calls to five Casey's and five Fareway stores in the Des Moines metro showed variations in what store representatives tell callers about whether
firearms can be brought into their stores.

The Register did not identify itself as a news organization when calling the stores. Instead, to get a sense of what store representatives tell members of
the public, a reporter called the store, asked for a manager, and asked whether firearms were allowed in the store.

Three Fareway stores' employees said their stores allow legal permit holders to open- or conceal-carry but have no independent policies beyond that.
A fourth store's employee said customers could conceal-carry with a permit, but not open-carry. And an employee at a fifth store was unsure of the
policy and directed questions to Fareway corporate.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't w ant to comment on their firearms policies. Customer service representatives at two Casey's stores told callers they preferred it if no firearms were brought inside, while two others said they follow state laws and allow legal firearms. A representative from a fifth store said customers are allowed to conceal-carry, but not open-carry.

Amber Gustafson, a prominent local Democrat and member of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a gun-control organization, spoke out
on social media regarding Hy-Vee allowing open-carry in its stores.

Gustafson told the Register she used to regularly shop at the Ankeny Hy-Vee in Prairie Trail until she spoke with a manager about whether or not the
store allows open-carry. After learning that Hy-Vee allows it, she said she stopped shopping there and goes to Walmart instead.

But Richard Rogers, a board member of the Iowa Firearms Coalition, a gun advocacy group, praised Hy-Vee. He said he's glad to hear the company is
still allowing legal gun owners to carry their firearms within its stores.

Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated Register requests about w hether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Potthoff said Hy-Vee has had no issues with allowing firearms in its stores.

Gustafson's family owns guns, she said, but she doesn’t feel safe if people around her are openly carrying firearms. She said she would be too
concerned for the safety of her children to approach a manager with her concerns.

High school students make up a good share of grocery store workers across the state. Gustafson said she worries for teens being in a store that allows
open-carry. She worries more that someone will accidentally discharge a firearm than she worries about a mass shooting.

“We don’t know if they have ill intent until they pull a trigger," Gustafson said. "Should I leave? Should I stay? What’s going to go down?”

Every day, Iowans are around people with firearms in stores — they just don't realize it, Rogers said.

He cautions companies to not “sway” to the lobbying efforts of political organizations.

Rogers said open carry isn't common to see in urban areas like Des Moines, but in rural Iowa, people working outside with a firearm to protect
themselves may walk into a Casey's to grab coffee or food.

No one in his group is calling for a boycott of Walmart, he said, but gun advocates may feel less inclined to shop in stores that restrict legal firearms.
Walmart may be asking law-abiding gun owners to leave their firearms at home, but that does nothing to prevent someone with ill intentions, he said.

“In Iowa, a merchant is free to put up any policy they want," Rogers said. "Our people would respect that and choose to go somewhere else."

As a practice, businesses try to avoid controversies that could damage the brand or offend consumers, Brouwer said.

But studies have shown that younger consumers expect companies to take a stand, and are more inclined to spend their money at businesses that
support issues that are important to them. On the flip side, older consumers are less focused on social issues when choosing where to shop, Brouwer
said.

Companies may face immediate backlash if they take a stance on an issue, but in the long run, it could help a company's branding, Brouwer said.

Financially, it’s too early to see if any of these changes will have benefits for Walmart or the other companies that followed suit.

Dick’s Sporting Goods, which has been a vocal supporter of gun-control legislation, has seen shares climb since mid-August, when it removed the
hunting category from 125 stores. It's the latest in a series of moves the chain has taken in the past two years to step back from firearm sales, a
decision that initially hurt its bottom line.

Brouwer expects more companies to take stances on social issues in the next five years as millennials get older and gain more buying power in the
market. She said companies will have to move beyond making statements as younger generations look for more action.

“Their behaviors will influence companies,” Brouwer said. “It’s harder for brands to hide behind playing it safe because sometimes that’s not a good
decision.”

Linh Ta covers retail for the Register. Reach her at lta@dmreg.com (mailto:lta@dmreg.com) or 515-284-8198.
I love the Midwest. "We just follow State laws." I will proudly continue to shop at all my favorite stores. Thanks MPM for giving some details and context.
*Remember: I'm just a guy on the internet :)
*Don't go to stupid places with stupid people & do stupid things.
*Be courteous. Look normal. Be in bed by 10'clock.

“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” -Bilbo Baggins.

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by MPMalloy » Sat Sep 14, 2019 8:19 pm

woodsghost wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 8:16 pm
MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 5:01 pm
woodsghost wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:24 pm
:ooh:
MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:40 pm
url=https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story ... 302182001/]And now here's what's happening in my neck of the woods[/url]
Could you give us a few hints? It seems to be behind a pay wall.
Here is a snippet:
Will Iowa companies like Hy-Vee and Casey's restrict guns as national retailers change rules?

Linh Ta, Des Moines Register Published 7:17 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019 | Updated 7:54 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019

While an increasing number of national retailers are asking customers to conceal their firearms or leave them at home, in Iowa, it's business as usual
for some of the state’s largest companies.

After a mass shooting in August at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart that left 22 people dead, the national spotlight fell to shopping venues, as activists on both sides of the issue debated whether firearms belong where people buy groceries or school supplies.

The debate won't stop anytime soon.

As younger generations make spending decisions, in part, on companies' positions on issues such as climate change and LGBTQ rights, more brands
will take stances, said Anne Brouwer, partner at retail consulting firm McMillan Doolittle in Chicago.

Hy-Vee, one of Iow a’s most prominent retailers w ith over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follow s state law s, meaning there are no
company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

After the El Paso shootings, Walmart said it would no longer sell certain ammunition and discouraged customers from openly carrying firearms in its
stores.

Kroger, CVS, Walgreens, Aldi and Meijer followed suit.

The Des Moines Register asked four major Iowa-based retailers to comment on their firearms policies, if they have them.

Under Iowa law (https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IC/ ... er.724.pdf), gun owners with a permit to carry weapons may conceal- or opencarry
a firearm. Open-carry allows for publicly visible firearms, typically in a holster, while conceal-carry requires that firearms be out of sight. The state
has designated weapons-free zones that include schools.

Hy-Vee, one of Iowa’s most prominent retailers with over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follows state laws, meaning there are
no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

But if customers see someone in a store who makes them uncomfortable, Hy-Vee spokesperson Tina Potthoff encouraged them to reach out to
customer service to talk to management or security, she said in a statement.

“The safety and security of our customers and employees is paramount,” Potthoff's statement said.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, has a similar policy.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, follow s state laws, meaning there are no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't want to comment. Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated
Register requests about whether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Phone calls to five Casey's and five Fareway stores in the Des Moines metro showed variations in what store representatives tell callers about whether
firearms can be brought into their stores.

The Register did not identify itself as a news organization when calling the stores. Instead, to get a sense of what store representatives tell members of
the public, a reporter called the store, asked for a manager, and asked whether firearms were allowed in the store.

Three Fareway stores' employees said their stores allow legal permit holders to open- or conceal-carry but have no independent policies beyond that.
A fourth store's employee said customers could conceal-carry with a permit, but not open-carry. And an employee at a fifth store was unsure of the
policy and directed questions to Fareway corporate.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't w ant to comment on their firearms policies. Customer service representatives at two Casey's stores told callers they preferred it if no firearms were brought inside, while two others said they follow state laws and allow legal firearms. A representative from a fifth store said customers are allowed to conceal-carry, but not open-carry.

Amber Gustafson, a prominent local Democrat and member of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a gun-control organization, spoke out
on social media regarding Hy-Vee allowing open-carry in its stores.

Gustafson told the Register she used to regularly shop at the Ankeny Hy-Vee in Prairie Trail until she spoke with a manager about whether or not the
store allows open-carry. After learning that Hy-Vee allows it, she said she stopped shopping there and goes to Walmart instead.

But Richard Rogers, a board member of the Iowa Firearms Coalition, a gun advocacy group, praised Hy-Vee. He said he's glad to hear the company is
still allowing legal gun owners to carry their firearms within its stores.

Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated Register requests about w hether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Potthoff said Hy-Vee has had no issues with allowing firearms in its stores.

Gustafson's family owns guns, she said, but she doesn’t feel safe if people around her are openly carrying firearms. She said she would be too
concerned for the safety of her children to approach a manager with her concerns.

High school students make up a good share of grocery store workers across the state. Gustafson said she worries for teens being in a store that allows
open-carry. She worries more that someone will accidentally discharge a firearm than she worries about a mass shooting.

“We don’t know if they have ill intent until they pull a trigger," Gustafson said. "Should I leave? Should I stay? What’s going to go down?”

Every day, Iowans are around people with firearms in stores — they just don't realize it, Rogers said.

He cautions companies to not “sway” to the lobbying efforts of political organizations.

Rogers said open carry isn't common to see in urban areas like Des Moines, but in rural Iowa, people working outside with a firearm to protect
themselves may walk into a Casey's to grab coffee or food.

No one in his group is calling for a boycott of Walmart, he said, but gun advocates may feel less inclined to shop in stores that restrict legal firearms.
Walmart may be asking law-abiding gun owners to leave their firearms at home, but that does nothing to prevent someone with ill intentions, he said.

“In Iowa, a merchant is free to put up any policy they want," Rogers said. "Our people would respect that and choose to go somewhere else."

As a practice, businesses try to avoid controversies that could damage the brand or offend consumers, Brouwer said.

But studies have shown that younger consumers expect companies to take a stand, and are more inclined to spend their money at businesses that
support issues that are important to them. On the flip side, older consumers are less focused on social issues when choosing where to shop, Brouwer
said.

Companies may face immediate backlash if they take a stance on an issue, but in the long run, it could help a company's branding, Brouwer said.

Financially, it’s too early to see if any of these changes will have benefits for Walmart or the other companies that followed suit.

Dick’s Sporting Goods, which has been a vocal supporter of gun-control legislation, has seen shares climb since mid-August, when it removed the
hunting category from 125 stores. It's the latest in a series of moves the chain has taken in the past two years to step back from firearm sales, a
decision that initially hurt its bottom line.

Brouwer expects more companies to take stances on social issues in the next five years as millennials get older and gain more buying power in the
market. She said companies will have to move beyond making statements as younger generations look for more action.

“Their behaviors will influence companies,” Brouwer said. “It’s harder for brands to hide behind playing it safe because sometimes that’s not a good
decision.”

Linh Ta covers retail for the Register. Reach her at lta@dmreg.com (mailto:lta@dmreg.com) or 515-284-8198.
I love the Midwest. "We just follow State laws." I will proudly continue to shop at all my favorite stores. Thanks MPM for giving some details and context.
I'm glad I could help. Iowa is a pretty reasonable state concerning weapons law. I mean, for not having a 2nd Amendment-type clause in our State's Constitution.

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by yossarian » Sat Sep 14, 2019 9:33 pm

MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 8:19 pm
woodsghost wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 8:16 pm
MPMalloy wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 5:01 pm
woodsghost wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:24 pm
:ooh: Could you give us a few hints? It seems to be behind a pay wall.
Here is a snippet:
Will Iowa companies like Hy-Vee and Casey's restrict guns as national retailers change rules?

Linh Ta, Des Moines Register Published 7:17 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019 | Updated 7:54 p.m. CT Sept. 12, 2019

While an increasing number of national retailers are asking customers to conceal their firearms or leave them at home, in Iowa, it's business as usual
for some of the state’s largest companies.

After a mass shooting in August at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart that left 22 people dead, the national spotlight fell to shopping venues, as activists on both sides of the issue debated whether firearms belong where people buy groceries or school supplies.

The debate won't stop anytime soon.

As younger generations make spending decisions, in part, on companies' positions on issues such as climate change and LGBTQ rights, more brands
will take stances, said Anne Brouwer, partner at retail consulting firm McMillan Doolittle in Chicago.

Hy-Vee, one of Iow a’s most prominent retailers w ith over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follow s state law s, meaning there are no
company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

After the El Paso shootings, Walmart said it would no longer sell certain ammunition and discouraged customers from openly carrying firearms in its
stores.

Kroger, CVS, Walgreens, Aldi and Meijer followed suit.

The Des Moines Register asked four major Iowa-based retailers to comment on their firearms policies, if they have them.

Under Iowa law (https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IC/ ... er.724.pdf), gun owners with a permit to carry weapons may conceal- or opencarry
a firearm. Open-carry allows for publicly visible firearms, typically in a holster, while conceal-carry requires that firearms be out of sight. The state
has designated weapons-free zones that include schools.

Hy-Vee, one of Iowa’s most prominent retailers with over 200 stores across eight states, said each of its locations follows state laws, meaning there are
no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

But if customers see someone in a store who makes them uncomfortable, Hy-Vee spokesperson Tina Potthoff encouraged them to reach out to
customer service to talk to management or security, she said in a statement.

“The safety and security of our customers and employees is paramount,” Potthoff's statement said.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, has a similar policy.

Kum & Go, a Des Moines-based convenience store company, follow s state laws, meaning there are no company-mandated restrictions on firearms.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't want to comment. Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated
Register requests about whether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Phone calls to five Casey's and five Fareway stores in the Des Moines metro showed variations in what store representatives tell callers about whether
firearms can be brought into their stores.

The Register did not identify itself as a news organization when calling the stores. Instead, to get a sense of what store representatives tell members of
the public, a reporter called the store, asked for a manager, and asked whether firearms were allowed in the store.

Three Fareway stores' employees said their stores allow legal permit holders to open- or conceal-carry but have no independent policies beyond that.
A fourth store's employee said customers could conceal-carry with a permit, but not open-carry. And an employee at a fifth store was unsure of the
policy and directed questions to Fareway corporate.

Fareway, a grocery store company based in Boone, didn't w ant to comment on their firearms policies. Customer service representatives at two Casey's stores told callers they preferred it if no firearms were brought inside, while two others said they follow state laws and allow legal firearms. A representative from a fifth store said customers are allowed to conceal-carry, but not open-carry.

Amber Gustafson, a prominent local Democrat and member of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a gun-control organization, spoke out
on social media regarding Hy-Vee allowing open-carry in its stores.

Gustafson told the Register she used to regularly shop at the Ankeny Hy-Vee in Prairie Trail until she spoke with a manager about whether or not the
store allows open-carry. After learning that Hy-Vee allows it, she said she stopped shopping there and goes to Walmart instead.

But Richard Rogers, a board member of the Iowa Firearms Coalition, a gun advocacy group, praised Hy-Vee. He said he's glad to hear the company is
still allowing legal gun owners to carry their firearms within its stores.

Casey's General Stores, based in Ankeny, didn't respond to repeated Register requests about w hether they have firearm policies of any kind.

Potthoff said Hy-Vee has had no issues with allowing firearms in its stores.

Gustafson's family owns guns, she said, but she doesn’t feel safe if people around her are openly carrying firearms. She said she would be too
concerned for the safety of her children to approach a manager with her concerns.

High school students make up a good share of grocery store workers across the state. Gustafson said she worries for teens being in a store that allows
open-carry. She worries more that someone will accidentally discharge a firearm than she worries about a mass shooting.

“We don’t know if they have ill intent until they pull a trigger," Gustafson said. "Should I leave? Should I stay? What’s going to go down?”

Every day, Iowans are around people with firearms in stores — they just don't realize it, Rogers said.

He cautions companies to not “sway” to the lobbying efforts of political organizations.

Rogers said open carry isn't common to see in urban areas like Des Moines, but in rural Iowa, people working outside with a firearm to protect
themselves may walk into a Casey's to grab coffee or food.

No one in his group is calling for a boycott of Walmart, he said, but gun advocates may feel less inclined to shop in stores that restrict legal firearms.
Walmart may be asking law-abiding gun owners to leave their firearms at home, but that does nothing to prevent someone with ill intentions, he said.

“In Iowa, a merchant is free to put up any policy they want," Rogers said. "Our people would respect that and choose to go somewhere else."

As a practice, businesses try to avoid controversies that could damage the brand or offend consumers, Brouwer said.

But studies have shown that younger consumers expect companies to take a stand, and are more inclined to spend their money at businesses that
support issues that are important to them. On the flip side, older consumers are less focused on social issues when choosing where to shop, Brouwer
said.

Companies may face immediate backlash if they take a stance on an issue, but in the long run, it could help a company's branding, Brouwer said.

Financially, it’s too early to see if any of these changes will have benefits for Walmart or the other companies that followed suit.

Dick’s Sporting Goods, which has been a vocal supporter of gun-control legislation, has seen shares climb since mid-August, when it removed the
hunting category from 125 stores. It's the latest in a series of moves the chain has taken in the past two years to step back from firearm sales, a
decision that initially hurt its bottom line.

Brouwer expects more companies to take stances on social issues in the next five years as millennials get older and gain more buying power in the
market. She said companies will have to move beyond making statements as younger generations look for more action.

“Their behaviors will influence companies,” Brouwer said. “It’s harder for brands to hide behind playing it safe because sometimes that’s not a good
decision.”

Linh Ta covers retail for the Register. Reach her at lta@dmreg.com (mailto:lta@dmreg.com) or 515-284-8198.
I love the Midwest. "We just follow State laws." I will proudly continue to shop at all my favorite stores. Thanks MPM for giving some details and context.
I'm glad I could help. Iowa is a pretty reasonable state concerning weapons law. I mean, for not having a 2nd Amendment-type clause in our State's Constitution.
I don't have anything important to say, I just wanted to see the article posted in it's entirety for the fourth time on one page. Oh, and I like quote trees.
" So, brave knights,
if you do doubt your courage or your strength, come no further,
for death awaits you all with nasty, big, pointy teeth."

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Re: Firearms Chat 6: Year of the 10mm

Post by NT2C » Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:04 pm

And that concludes this edition of Firearms Chat Thread.
Nonsolis Radios Sediouis Fulmina Mitto. - USN Gunner's Mate motto

Sic quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit; occidentis telum est - Seneca the Younger, Epistles

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