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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2011 8:22 pm 
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Those of us that prep for families with medical problems face many challenges. We stock up on the things they need, and make plans to deal with the extraordinary problems that may come up during a disaster. If our family members need special diets, we stock food and water that they can eat. If they need medical equipment, we try to keep it in repair and stock extra parts. If they need medication, we try to stock emergency meds. But how many of us look at how secure those stocks of meds are in our own homes? Here in Eastern Kentucky, Operation Unite began a campaign to raise awareness about the need to secure prescription drugs in our homes, because many drug users get their first fix right out of Mommy and Daddy's medicine cabinet. In essence, Mommy and Daddy are "Accidental Dealers".

An Accidental Dealer is someone who unknowingly allows others to access their meds because they fail to see the harm in an unlocked medicine chest or med bag. Their children can get into their scripts. Their neighbors could get into their meds. That unfettered access just might be the first step in a life of drug addiction and crime. Something as simple as securing your meds can be very important in preventing your children from stepping down the very ugly and life-threatening road of drug addiction, crime, and all the other bad things that come with it. How much more important is it when you have large stocks of emergency prescriptions in your home?

Lock up your meds and your med preps, folks. The life you save may be your child's.


McCreary County Record wrote:

Operation UNITE launches prescription awareness campaign

By JANIE SLAVEN News Editor The McCreary County Record Tue Jan 25, 2011, 01:05 PM EST

WHITLEY CITY — A University of Kentucky study has shown rural teenagers in Kentucky are 26 percent more likely to abuse prescription drugs than those living in urban areas.

The study — spearheaded by epidemiology professor Dr. Jennifer Havens — looked at data from 17,872 participants ages 12 to 17 in the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Indicating that 13 percent of rural teens have used prescription drugs recreationally, it showed those teens are getting pills from medicine cabinets in their home.

That finding has prompted Operation UNITE to launch the Accidental Drug Dealer Community Campaign, a three-month program designed to inform communities about prescription drug abuse through town hall-style meetings and public service announcements.

Locally the campaign will be organized through Champions/UNITE for a Drug Free McCreary County. The coalition held a training meeting last Thursday led by Brandy Wilson, who noted that the average age of first-time drug abuse in eastern Kentucky is about 11 years old.

“I think this program can be very beneficial to parents and grandparents,” she said.

Organizers hope to give a 30-minute presentation to at least three civic groups among other activities and cap the campaign with a county-wide “Pill Dragon” event. The “dragon” is a mobile incinerator which safely disposes of unused or outdated medications.

Anyone interested in participating in the campaign should attend the next Champions meeting this Friday at noon in the SCC-McCreary Center conference room.

To learn more about the the campaign, contact Sunshine Canada at sunshine.canada@ mccreary.kyschools.us or Roger Owens at 606-376-9346, or visit the UNITE website at http://www.operationunite.org.

http://mccrearyrecord.com/x316477008/Are-you-an-Accidental-Dealer

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:18 am 
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You raise a really good point DarkAxel; one that I hope those with medications in the house pay attention to. It doesn't necessarily need to be your own medication either, but another family member's. I had a friend in highschool that developed an oxycontin addiction from meds that he stole from his grandmother. If you know of family members that have medications that are readily accessible; maybe recommend that they are secured or my personal favorite: be aware of what your kids are doing. :)

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 11:19 pm 
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I can add some relevant first-hand experience to this thread.

My wife is on some anti-depression meds, some Schedule 4 stuff. We have 3 kids, 16-year old twins (fraternal, boy & girl) and a 12 year old. Last March my otherwise intelligent daughter got mixed up with a boy and his group of friends who were into popping pills. They convinced my daughter to swipe some of her mother's pills and bring them to school; she took a couple herself, gave the rest to other kids. The boy ended up suffering a mild overdose and going to the emergency room, all the other kids of course rolled on my daughter saying she was the one who had always been providing them. The school called the cops and she was expelled the rest of the year. The county filed charges, initially prosecuting her on a Class B dealing of controlled substances on school grounds. They let her plead to a lesser Class D possession charge, put her on probation and gave her 25 hours of community service. She got off easy because she'd never been in any previous trouble, has a solid home life, is a straight A student and was honest about everything. Also, her confession opened a lot of doors into an investigation into the drug problem in the area, and several kids in the school ended up in trouble.

She worked to earn the money to pay her own court fees and completed her community service on weeknights after school and on weekends when she wasn't babysitting. She made all that happen on her own and made sure to stay in touch with her probation officer to make sure she was staying on the right line with it all. For me though, the icing on the cake was when she left her Facebook open on the computer one day and nosy Dad got to snooping - I checked her message history and found a discussion she'd had with another kid who was talking about getting high. She promptly let him have it about how stupid that was and not worth the trouble, and she should know because she just had to deal with it. Right then and there I logged her out and have never said a word.

I was extremely disappointed by my daughter's poor decision that got her in trouble, but knowing what it was like being a teenager, I wasn't surprised. I am VERY proud of the way she handled the consequences of her actions and even more proud to see that she actually learned something from it.

In general, I am an over-protective parent (I'm a correctional officer and have looked into the eyes of evil; it often looks just like your 'average' person), but as my kids have gotten older I've been careful to give them trust and space and to teach them right from wrong, at least as our society gauges it. This was a case of an easily-influenced young woman doing what she thought would keep her 'in' with her boyfriend and his crowd, and learning the hard way that sometimes being 'cool' isn't worth it.

My wife is careful to keep an eye on her meds and keeps them in their bottles in her purse. My daughter had just been very careful about how many she took so as not to make it obvious any were missing. There's a lot of trust in our house, even after this. Sure, I have some trust issues with my daughter but she's working very hard to make amends. In my house, my kids all know where the guns are and how to use them, but we have been paying a little closer attention to the meds over the last few months. ;)

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:03 am 
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That's a very good post, Rob. Thanks for sharing. Your family managed to make it through well, and it seems like your daughter is sharp enough to learn a good lesson when it comes her way. Kudos to all of you for handling it the way you did.

I want to emphasize my OP with a little bit of anecdotal evidence. I'm also breaking PERSEC a little, but I think the cause is worth it.

I graduated from Breathitt County High School in 1998. I wasn't ranked, but there were about 500 other students in my graduating class. A third of them (as of Jan 2011) have either been arrested on drug related charges, been enrolled in a drug rehab program, or have died of overdoses. 90% of those were prescription drug related. And the kids I'm talking about weren't in traditional high-risk groups. I'd say about half of them came from good, stable, and loving homes. Here's a couple pointed examples:

One of the most popular girls in my class was Jane Doe (I may break my own PERSEC, but I won't break another's). She had a good family, fine clothes, and attended religious services regularly. When we graduated, she had a full-ride scholarship with Transylvania University. She didn't make it. By the time I caught up with her back in 2004, she offered to fuck me for 25 bucks. Her drug of choice? Xanax. Sure, she got her first fix with her friends from someone else's medicine chest, but she was arrested with a bottle of her Mom's Loratabs trying to trade them to an undercover for a few nerve pills.

Another fellow from my graduating class was at the top of his game in 1998. He was a popular member of the High-school football team, and had three State Championship rings to brag about. After graduation, his mother was diagnosed with cancer. Four years later, he's stealing his Mom's Oxycontin to get high while she dies in pain. The guilt nearly drove him to suicide, but his father got him into rehab and sent him to a shrink to get straightened out. Four months after being released, he died from respiratory failure after mixing Methadone with Xanax. His championship rings are floating around on the pawn circuit now.



Prescription drug use is on the rise here in the States. many kids are getting drawn in and smothered by the lifestyle. I've buried a lot of friends and relatives on account of prescription drug abuse, and I'm tired of it. For those of you with stocks of abused drugs, for the love of everything sacred, holy, or well-loved, keep them secure.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:46 am 
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It occurred to me as i was reading this that even though I do not have stockpiled human meds i do have a large selection of agricultural/livestock meds, including pain killers and antibiotics. I'd not thought of the potential for abuse but this has me thinking a lock for the barn drugs is in order.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 9:48 am 
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I have lost quite a few friends and family members to this type of abuse. There not dead just dead to me and I have no remorse or pitty for them at all. When I took leave to visit the folks in WV I found out and seen first hand the effects of this type of drug abuse. These people are what I call zombies as they now just feed off the people around them. They have no real use to the world, all they care about is the oxy express ride there on. Now that scares the crap out ouf me.

These people are doing anything they can to buy a few more pills.(this is my area in WV I am talking about) There was a raid on a house a few miles from the folks house. They recovered a large amount of pills and other drugs. The man they arrested was jobless and on welfare. Here is the kicker he own two new cars and owned one of the best houses in the area.

Depends on the area there is real good money in this. According to the news he was driving to florida to get pain killers then driving back and selling them. There are artices all over the news and web about this. Here is just one example.

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime ... tArticle=y

I will not say anymore as I will go into a flamming fit of rage and stupidity as this pisses me off to no end. So please people keep your stuff locked up.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 10:17 am 
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The local news has been covering the accidental dealer story for a while in the surrounding area.
I don't have any prescription meds but the OTC stuff I have is kept under lock and key.
Had it not been for the news I would not have thought about this, I am glad you brought it to the attention of others.

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This thread should be a sticky...

The wife is on some pretty hardcore meds due to some medical issues, and I've been wondering as my grandson gets older, and able to reach into drawers and whatnot... how to secure them.
I think we are going to invest in a small firesafe (we already have two for papers and whatnot) just for the meds.

The thing is, with her meds, they are heavily regulated, so we literally have a pill count on each,

No one wants to belief their kids would steal, but better safe than sorry.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:13 pm 
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SeerSavant wrote:

No one wants to belief their kids would steal, but better safe than sorry.


I think that was really the hardest part about my experience with my daughter - just the simple fact that should would steal from her mom like that... I'm not at all surprised that she tried out something new and 'taboo' - kids do that. But it was an eye-opener. My kids aren't perfect angels (they're teenagers!) but I never expected a violation of household trust like that. I hope that others here can take away from my post exactly what you said: better safe than sorry.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:30 pm 
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Excellent Post!

Any special medications or controlled medical supplies should be locked up in the safe next to the guns and ammo - the potential for harm is the same.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 9:11 pm 
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Rob Salem wrote:
SeerSavant wrote:

No one wants to belief their kids would steal, but better safe than sorry.


I think that was really the hardest part about my experience with my daughter - just the simple fact that should would steal from her mom like that... I'm not at all surprised that she tried out something new and 'taboo' - kids do that. But it was an eye-opener. My kids aren't perfect angels (they're teenagers!) but I never expected a violation of household trust like that. I hope that others here can take away from my post exactly what you said: better safe than sorry.



I understand that part very well, I won't go into detail on my own experience, but suffice to say, after a long time of having quit smoking, I got a double whammy from my daughter, and ended up finding the nearest store to fire one up.

Took a long time to work back the trust, and no, it never really goes back to what you had before, but it's a turning point in a parent child relationship.

It takes time, and it's a rough haul, but things get better.


They just don't go back to the way it was.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 9:41 pm 
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My mom recently asked me if I wanted some of her Vicodin (she has a prescription due to a foot surgery) to put in my emergency kit. While I HAVE been in situations when it would have been extremely handy (sister had excruciating back pain while on a strenuous hike up a mountain; painkillers would have been incredibly useful), I declined, because I didn't want to be in possession of a prescription medication without a prescription. Not that it would likely ever be a problem (I can hardly see a park ranger searching a hiker's first aid kit to read the impression on each pill), but I like being able to truthfully answer any question I'm asked by a law enforcement officer. Just makes things easier. (Obviously, if I had accepted the medication, I wouldn't be posting about it here.)

This isn't really the same thing, in that I wouldn't have used the pills recreationally, but it seemed relevant so I thought I'd share.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2011 2:43 pm 
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Well I have a bottle of vicoden that was prescribe to me a two years ago for pain after hernia surgery. I was lucky and not in to much pain so I never even opened the bottle. I have considered tossing them out. ( I guess the prefered method is to return them to the phamacy for disposal.) I have not done it though because I figure in a PAW situation strong pain killers might be required to care for injured until medical services are restored. Of course they could only be used for myself, and there might be concern about using them for an injury other than the surgery they were prescribed for, but in a PAW I think that would be less worrysome than the inability to function/recover from injury.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:13 pm 
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After reading this thread I thought that it was about time to go through the medical cabinet and I found an unopened bottle of Percocet. The prescription was for my wife for when she gave birth to our twins. I asked my wife if she thought we should keep the 12 pills for emergencies, but we both were uncomfortable about having them in the house. I took them to the pharmacy who promptly turned us away and instructed us to take them to the state Department of Health (more than an hour from my house). I don't want to burn half a tank of gas just to be a responsible citizen.

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I didn't want to be in possession of a prescription medication without a prescription. Not that it would likely ever be a problem (I can hardly see a park ranger searching a hiker's first aid kit to read the impression on each pill), but I like being able to truthfully answer any question I'm asked by a law enforcement officer


Like Jeriah, I'm uncomfortable keeping them in my medical kit and wonder about the legality of doing so. Any thoughts on what I should do?


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 4:48 pm 
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The regulations on drug disposal got tougher a couple years ago - health care institutions now face massive fines for improper disposal, and proper disposal is incredibly expensive (which is a big reason why they won't do it for you). Save them until you're going that direction, or call the department of health to see if they're doing a collection closer to you at some point.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 6:02 pm 
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DarkandShiny wrote:
After reading this thread I thought that it was about time to go through the medical cabinet and I found an unopened bottle of Percocet. The prescription was for my wife for when she gave birth to our twins. I asked my wife if she thought we should keep the 12 pills for emergencies, but we both were uncomfortable about having them in the house. I took them to the pharmacy who promptly turned us away and instructed us to take them to the state Department of Health (more than an hour from my house). I don't want to burn half a tank of gas just to be a responsible citizen.

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I didn't want to be in possession of a prescription medication without a prescription. Not that it would likely ever be a problem (I can hardly see a park ranger searching a hiker's first aid kit to read the impression on each pill), but I like being able to truthfully answer any question I'm asked by a law enforcement officer


Like Jeriah, I'm uncomfortable keeping them in my medical kit and wonder about the legality of doing so. Any thoughts on what I should do?


Here in Kentucky the preferred method of disposal is incineration. They have this portable incinerator the call the "Pill Dragon" they can set up when they have a drug disposal day.

My advice? Lock them up until you can get out to the Health Department, or call the local police and see if they have something similar to the "Pill Dragon".

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 6:13 pm 
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Just called the police department. They were extremely glad I called and were very polite. Said they would send a squad car out to our house on Monday morning to collect the bottle. I offered to bring them down to the station but apparently there is less paper work if they do a collection.

Problem solved I guess. Hope the officer doesn't have a substance abuse problem :)

Seems like a lot of fuss over 12 pills but I guess that's how serious the problem is.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 6:52 pm 
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The police have a vested interest in keeping those pills off of the street, and with the rise of prescription drug abuse, more and more police departments are collecting and disposing of prescription drugs and OTC drugs containing psuedoephidrene and ephedrine as a service to the public.

Perhaps we should include a list of commonly abused prescription drugs in this thread.

Off the top of my head:

Oxycodone - Trade names: Oxycontin, Percocet, Percodan. Endocet.
Hydrocodone - Trade Names: Vicodin, Loracet, Loratab.
Alprazolam - Trade Name: Xanax
Diazepam - Trade name: Valium
Gabapentin - Trade Names: Fanatrex, Neurontin, Nupentin
Methadone - Trade Name: Methadose
Phenobarbital - Trade Name: Luminol
Fentanyl - Trade Name: Duragesic.
Quetiapine - Trade Name: Seroquel, Seroquil XR

This is by no means comprehensive, and is representative of the drugs being abused in my AO. Please add to the list!

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 7:38 pm 
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SeerSavant wrote:
This thread should be a sticky...
Yes. Yes it should.
Jeriah wrote:
...I can hardly see a park ranger searching a hiker's first aid kit to read the impression on each pill...

You'd be surprised what rangers come across. I did an internship at a state park, and as the lead ranger there pointed out, "People don't take a vacation from their habits, they take their habits on vacation." They've had a lot of serious crimes there over the years, enough that a buddy and I built them an evidence locker...

Actually, any pill you have should be in the original container. People have been prosecuted for trafficking Advil.

No label = bad!

DarkandShiny wrote:
Like Jeriah, I'm uncomfortable keeping them in my medical kit and wonder about the legality of doing so. Any thoughts on what I should do?

The Hospice nurse that helped us close out my Grandma's affairs showwed me how to put meds into a ziploc with kitty-litter and water. I suppose for added security, use used kitty litter :lol: The idea being that the drug gets disolved in the water, then absorbed into the kitty litter, and is not usable.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 10:56 am 
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Quote:
Please add to the list!


Okay. The university I attended stated that the fifth most abused drug on campus was Ritalin. Any methylphenidate (or any stimulant) has the potential for abuse. These 'uppers' are widely available due to the prevalence of ADD, ADHD, Narcolepsy etc.


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I've got another one for the list.

Clonazepam, trade name Klonopin

My doctor gave me prescription to help me with my panic attacks, so I looked it up on Wikipedia, and this is what I found:

Wikipedia wrote:
A 2006 US government study of nationwide emergency department (ED) visits conducted by SAMHSA found that sedative-hypnotics in the USA were the most frequently implicated pharmaceutical drug in ED visits. Benzodiazepines accounted for the majority of these. Clonazepam was the second most frequently implicated benzodiazepine in ED visits in the study. The study examined the number of times non-medical use of certain drugs were implicated in ED visits; the criteria for non-medical use in this study were purposefully broad, and include for example, drug abuse, accidental or intentional overdose, or adverse reactions resulting from legitimate use of the medication.


After experiencing the lethargy that results from a mere 0.5 milligrams, I'm willing to believe it.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 9:53 pm 
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FYI - just because a drug is on this list - doesn't mean you should automatically stop taking it or never take it, if prescribed. Do talk to your own doc before stopping a med, do talk to your doc if you have any concerns with a medication they suggest for you. Every single drug in existance has some risks, just be aware of them.

On an entirely different note, be aware of what is prescribed for your pets, if anything, diversion from pets/livestock to people is a problem the veterinarians also see on occasion.

lorazepam = Ativan
chlordiazepoxide = Librium
temazepam = Restoril
triazolam = Halcion (again, not as common)
oxazepam = Serax

Adderall =dextroamphetamine/amphetamine = amphetamine salts
Concerta = methylphenidate (same drug as ritalin, time release system)

Ultram = tramadol - this one might be controversial, it not a straight narcotic but one of the places it acts is one of the opioid receptors. I've seen enough people act like they're addicted to it, and the narcotic addicts would work to get it if they couldn't get one of the regular narcotics. If Seroquel and gapapentin are on the list, this should be too.

Dilaudid = hydromorphone
Opana = oxymorphone (not a common one...)

pregabalin = Lyrica - this is in the same class as gabapentin (which is apparently abused, but not nearly as much as the narcotic/painkillers or the benzodiazepines/tranquilizers)

Ambien = Zolpidem - it's a controlled substance, again, not abused as much as the pain killers or tranquilizers.

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duodecima wrote:
FYI - just because a drug is on this list - doesn't mean you should automatically stop taking it or never take it, if prescribed. Do talk to your own doc before stopping a med, do talk to your doc if you have any concerns with a medication they suggest for you. Every single drug in existance has some risks, just be aware of them.


QFT.

I don't want people to stop taking their meds. I want those with abused meds to lock them up or secure them. I'd also want you guys to prep your meds legally. Store your meds in proper containers and keep receipts for your scripts. I would even go so far as to say to keep opiates out of your BOBs unless you have current scripts for them (by current, I mean within 30 days). You are liable to run into serious problems if you don't.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 1:41 pm 
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Great Point.

Florida has a Huge problem with "Pill Mills" and I can see how that would be a problem that might rise. Everyone has need, and if a family member needs some medication of course you are going to start stocking up on it. But now days they make a big deal if you even try to get a 3month supply.

Can't even by deconstruction for a cold without signing your life away. What happens when they find 5 packs of decongestant in the house? Will that be enough for you go to jail because they think you want to make Drugs or Sell them?

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