Family size meal stove

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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by prtp3warrior » Tue Mar 27, 2012 2:55 pm

francisscott22 wrote:My family has been using two stoves ever since. A jotul wood stove and propane. When we are camping out we always use the propane because of it's portability and long burning life.
Cool. I have a Jotul. Its from the mid 80s. 201 Turbo. Very efficient. Very cool(hot) stove. A wood stove will be a hot commodity in the PAW. You would probably want to move it outside in the summer.

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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Anianna » Mon Apr 02, 2012 3:35 pm

I'm not sure how I missed this thread previously, but I'm adding my vote for the rocket stove. I posted a DIY for one here. It requires some cutting, but no welding. Rocket stoves are the kind of stoves used to save lives in third world countries since they efficiently burn small diameter fuel without the dangers of traditional cooking fires (such as smoke inhalation and errant sparks). Anyway, here is what I posted in that other thread:

Image

(Click the pic for build instructions)
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by techmonkey » Mon Apr 02, 2012 5:16 pm

Anianna wrote:I'm not sure how I missed this thread previously, but I'm adding my vote for the rocket stove. I posted a DIY for one here. It requires some cutting, but no welding. Rocket stoves are the kind of stoves used to save lives in third world countries since they efficiently burn small diameter fuel without the dangers of traditional cooking fires (such as smoke inhalation and errant sparks). Anyway, here is what I posted in that other thread:

Image

(Click the pic for build instructions)

How does the paint hold up? I would think that the fumes from it might be toxic. You may want to sand it off and spray on some hi-temp BBQ paint.

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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Anianna » Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:05 pm

techmonkey wrote:
Anianna wrote:I'm not sure how I missed this thread previously, but I'm adding my vote for the rocket stove. I posted a DIY for one here. It requires some cutting, but no welding. Rocket stoves are the kind of stoves used to save lives in third world countries since they efficiently burn small diameter fuel without the dangers of traditional cooking fires (such as smoke inhalation and errant sparks). Anyway, here is what I posted in that other thread:

Image

(Click the pic for build instructions)

How does the paint hold up? I would think that the fumes from it might be toxic. You may want to sand it off and spray on some hi-temp BBQ paint.
The pail isn't what heats up, the pipe inside does. I would use stovepipe, myself. There is insulation between the stovepipe and the pail wall, so you should not have any significant fumes burning from a painted or treated pail, from what I understand.
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Belair56 » Wed May 09, 2012 8:56 pm

I have both a 2 burner and 3 burner coleman stove runs on White gas, also converted the 2 burner to run on Propane, Both helped me survive the great ice storm of 1998.

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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Tonto » Fri May 11, 2012 10:11 pm

Has anyone thought about using the kerosene stoves or cookers? Like those found here? http://www.endtimesreport.com/kerosene_cookers.html I've been looking at getting the 16 wick or even the pressurized butterfly kero stove as a backup since we store a decent amount of kerosene.
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by MarkW » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:47 pm

I think it is important to have a couple different kinds of stoves as there are a few different kinds of situations where they are needed. A propane (or kero) stove is pretty unbeatable when it comes to whipping a hot meal quickly and one that can burn gasoline should also not be dismissed but in a Katrina type of situation a wood stove has no equal IMHO.

It used to be that every little country hardware store had these ultra-cheap sheet metal stoves for sale:
Image

They sold them because they worked. You put an inch or two of sand in the bottom and as long as they don't get rained on they last for quite a few years. Keep it on the back porch during the summer, and bring it inside in the fall and make a sheet metal and plywood spacer to fit into an open window and seal it off and run the stove pipe through that. They'll burn anything you can fit in the top opening- busted up pallets, 2X4's, tree branches, heck even sections of car tires if you are desperate.

I've never had one of those folding metal portable backpacking stoves but I'll build or buy one at some point, there is a lot to be said for making a small quick fire to heat water with when you don't wish to start up something bigger.
Image

And if you have a bit of discretionary income, these stoves are pretty darn cool!
http://www.marinestove.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Another item on my list is to make a decent and sturdy solar oven for rice and beans. I've made several over the years from stuff like styrofoam and cardboard, but I've always thought one made out of a well insulated metal or plywood box would be nice to have.

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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by ineffableone » Wed Aug 15, 2012 9:36 pm

I am surprised no one has yet mentioned the Volcano stoves yet. 3 fuel options, family sized but still relatively portable, easy to use, and has had good reviews. I don't have one but have seen this stove a few times around youtube and emergency supply stores. I don't have a family to think about cooking for but if I did I would be looking at stuff like this Volcano stove.

Image

Image

Image

A couple videos about this stove, since pictures don't show you how easy it is to put up and down. The pictures also don't give a good size comparison. These videos help give more of a sense of what these stoves are like.



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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by TacAir » Wed Aug 15, 2012 9:49 pm

Tonto wrote:Has anyone thought about using the kerosene stoves or cookers? Like those found here? http://www.endtimesreport.com/kerosene_cookers.html I've been looking at getting the 16 wick or even the pressurized butterfly kero stove as a backup since we store a decent amount of kerosene.
There are several sizes and types of kero stoves.

Image
Perfection Kerosene Cookstoves -- I would say that the better part of 2500 for a backup stove is not something most folks would pay.

A smaller unit by the same company breaks down for storage
Image
Still painful at $750.

Some products from India are now making it to market...
Image


I did find this interesting, if poorly done video on a new type of kerosene stove from India
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Neddog » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:11 pm

I love the simple twig stoves, whether a big rocket stove for larger cooking or a folding compact for camp-ware cooking... This is what I use out in the woods, which is much more efficient than starting a big ground fire (besides not needing to make a grill, too):

Image

I love the style of this one 'cause I'm old fashioned, lol. Reminds me of a classic wood stove that you would heat your house with, but miniaturized. I don't know if you can buy these anymore though, I've had mine for nearly a couple decades. It does the same thing as the newer round sierra stoves anyways... The only thing I don't like about the round ones is that they don't fold up so nice and flat as mine. I also have another old rectangular one (just as old in manufacture, but in pristine like-new condition) but it's missing one small rod in order to put it together.

However, there's still a lot to be said for multi-fuel stoves as well. I used to have one of those Whisperlite multi-fuel stoves, which will burn all kinds of liquid fuel from white gas to kerosene to butane. These things are very convenient, and the most efficient gas-saving method for burning fuel in a survival situation. Fuel does last a very long time.

Of course, these options are all for personal cooking. Same idea applies for the family, just get larger versions (ie, like the rocket stove for twigs and a two-burner multi-fuel stove for gas). My family includes myself and a 10 lbs dog, so I don't worry about that. :)

It's natural to think that the wood stove would be the obvious choice for the most abundant, renewable fuel source... and in a global sense it is. However, how do we really know exactly what kind of situations we'll find ourselves in during an emergency? It just might be that kerosene or the ability to make kerosene is more plentiful than wood!

If you're really confident though in your location to provide you with lots of firewood, and your only concern is the loss of electricity... then why not outfit your home with a real wood stove? It'll do more than cook for you, it will also heat your house in the winter, provide you with hot water, and allow you to cook off just the residue of that heat. That will easily allow you to cook for a whole family. But it might be too "wasteful" if you are unsure about how long your resources will last you.
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Kutter_0311 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:36 pm

I'm going to try some copy pasta of my posts on another board regarding how I prep food for our family:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IMO, the JB Flash PCS is the bee's knees. Early JB PCS's had some minor flaws. Other new models delete features that are better to have than have not. The Flash model is Best of Breed.

Essential shopping list:

Flash PCS
6x large fuel cans(240g?)
2x small fuel cans(100g)
Sea to Summit aluminum long-handled spoon

Nice add-ons:

coffe press
pot support
extra PCS cup(but I'd rather just get another whole PCS)

If you're cooking Mountain House in the packets for several people, set up 1 burner and rotate 2 cups for quick cooking. Each cup will boil water for 1 packet(2 cups usually) in 1-2 minutes. If you clean out MH packets, they work great for making ramen, and ramen is a great way to stretch your bug-out food budget and increase your calories with minimal weight. I think it also mixes right in to most MH to make a bigger meal. More bang for the buck is nice.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My issue there is that each person should, ideally, have their own PCS in their BOB. Each BOB should be minimally dependant on the other. I'd like to try the Sumo at some point, but I'm pretty sure the 1.8L isn't boil capacity. They usually mark it half way down for a boil limit to prevent boil-over(which I did the first time I tried to make coffee in my Flash. Not fun...) I doubt if many of the other accessories will work in the Sumo, at least the coffee press, which is quickly becoming a favorite now that I've got it down.

Easiest way to cook for two, if you both have a PCS, is to set up one PCS, get the water going, pull out the other PCS cup and get water in it, pull out and prep your MH packets, now your 1st 2 cups are boiling so swap PCS cups, pour and stir the first packet, reload the PCS cup for ramen, prep your ramen in a cleaned-out MH packet, now your 2nd 2 cups are boiling so switch PCS cups again, pour and stir your second packet of MH, reload this PCS cup to 3/4 full for coffee and stick the coffee press in the cover, switch PCS cups at the boil, pour your 3rd 2 cups into the ramen(let soak 3 minutes), let the 4th cup heat to ALMOST boiling(Flash temp indicator is handy here), pop your coffee grounds in and stir, let brew off heat for 10 minutes before pressing and pouring.

Now you've made 2 packets of MH, can split a packet of ramen to add to the MH or eat as a side, and coffee! You can also expand the whole cycle for as many guests as you have with minimal delay since the only thing you wait on is the 2-cup boil(1-2 minutes each). You've only started 1 can of fuel, and the only cleanup required is to thoroughly rinse your coffee grounds off the coffee gear. No washing required, you're just going to boil the stuff the next time you use it anyway.

Everything packs together really well in the Flash PCS, too. The stabilizer tripod, burner, 100g fuel can, pot support, and coffee press all fit into the Flash PCS cup, and the 240g fuel can stacks on top or bottom, being the same diameter as the PCS cup. If using the rotating system outlined above, try packing the contents of the PCS cup in a 1gal Ziploc inside the PCS cup to simplify repack and prevent parts loss while the cup is in use.
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by MarkW » Wed Aug 15, 2012 11:13 pm

Sportsmans Guide still has those:

http://www.amazon.com/Innovative-Produc ... B000HR95NO" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;



Neddog wrote:I love the simple twig stoves, whether a big rocket stove for larger cooking or a folding compact for camp-ware cooking... This is what I use out in the woods, which is much more efficient than starting a big ground fire (besides not needing to make a grill, too):

Image

I love the style of this one 'cause I'm old fashioned, lol. Reminds me of a classic wood stove that you would heat your house with, but miniaturized. I don't know if you can buy these anymore though, I've had mine for nearly a couple decades. It does the same thing as the newer round sierra stoves anyways... The only thing I don't like about the round ones is that they don't fold up so nice and flat as mine. I also have another old rectangular one (just as old in manufacture, but in pristine like-new condition) but it's missing one small rod in order to put it together.

However, there's still a lot to be said for multi-fuel stoves as well. I used to have one of those Whisperlite multi-fuel stoves, which will burn all kinds of liquid fuel from white gas to kerosene to butane. These things are very convenient, and the most efficient gas-saving method for burning fuel in a survival situation. Fuel does last a very long time.

Of course, these options are all for personal cooking. Same idea applies for the family, just get larger versions (ie, like the rocket stove for twigs and a two-burner multi-fuel stove for gas). My family includes myself and a 10 lbs dog, so I don't worry about that. :)

It's natural to think that the wood stove would be the obvious choice for the most abundant, renewable fuel source... and in a global sense it is. However, how do we really know exactly what kind of situations we'll find ourselves in during an emergency? It just might be that kerosene or the ability to make kerosene is more plentiful than wood!

If you're really confident though in your location to provide you with lots of firewood, and your only concern is the loss of electricity... then why not outfit your home with a real wood stove? It'll do more than cook for you, it will also heat your house in the winter, provide you with hot water, and allow you to cook off just the residue of that heat. That will easily allow you to cook for a whole family. But it might be too "wasteful" if you are unsure about how long your resources will last you.

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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Neddog » Wed Aug 15, 2012 11:16 pm

MarkW wrote:Sportsmans Guide still has those:

http://www.amazon.com/Innovative-Produc ... B000HR95NO" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Awesome! Thanks for the tip... I mean, this thing has lasted me nearly two decades and I'm sure it's not likely to give away anytime soon. But it's nice to know they are still being made!
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by Spook1961 » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:28 pm

Just curious if anyone has had any experience with this type of stove? I live in a heavily wooded area and was contemplating this type of set up.

http://www.deadwoodstove.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by NamelessStain » Tue Nov 27, 2012 8:07 am

Spook1961 wrote:Just curious if anyone has had any experience with this type of stove? I live in a heavily wooded area and was contemplating this type of set up.

http://www.deadwoodstove.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Miki
It's just a rocket stove. You can make one yourself out of just about anything: old cans/drums, bricks, etc. Do a search on 'rocket stove' or 'hobo stove'. I just saved you money and a lot of excess weight :)
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Re: Family size meal stove

Post by showpare » Thu Nov 29, 2012 8:56 pm

We have and use the following. We wanted something that was close to what we are used to using. We started out with a dual fuel Coleman. Then we found this Camp Chef. Then we got an old RV range oven. We keep fuel on hand for the Big Buddy heaters and the propane fridge, too. Next year, I’m going to look for a larger, more permanent propane tank.

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