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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 11:45 am 
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So the wife and I are expecting our first child early next year which brings me to my question. What do I need to start adding to my preps if we expect to bug out or even bug in? This is completely foreign territory for me and I am completely out of my depth when it comes to adding stuff for babies into my preps. The wife is at least capable of taking care of herself for the most part if I'm at work or some such but once she starts getting towards the end of her pregnancy and especially when the baby is born my whole prepping dynamic and indeed my whole world will dramatically change. So any advice or links to other threads (I did search but most threads did lean more towards bigger children) would be greatly, greatly appreciated.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 12:01 pm 
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Not knowing your wife's personal opinions or health situation, one suggestion I can offer is that breastfeeding the baby will simplify your preps a LOT. Baby formula is expensive and doesn't have a very long shelf life. Assuming she is healthy and able and willing to breast feed, that would be one way to lower your costs, as well as the number of items you'll have to stock up on. Baby bottles are expensive and have to be sterilized, at least at first. Of course, not everyone has the option of breast feeding, for various reasons.

You will need a lot of diapers and a lot of wipes. Cloth diapers are getting more common again, but in an SHTF situation you're not going to want to waste water or time in boiling, washing, and drying diapers and wash cloths.

These are the first two things I thought of- I will need to think about this some more. My daughter is seven, so I don't remember everything about having a newborn very clearly any more. Most importantly, though, CONGRATULATIONS! Having a baby does change everything, but it's the best thing life has to offer, in my opinion.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 1:39 pm 
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Parent of an 8 month old here, recently went through this as well.

One nice thing about it will be having a perfectly acceptable well stocked bug out bag everywhere you go without anybody batting an eye at you. Even places that want you to leave a bag at the register will not take away your diaper bag.

Clothing:
We use cloth diapers (a sprayer hooked up to the toilets water supply is a must, no swishing a diaper around in the toilet for me) at home, and disposables when on the move. A blanket is always around, for a clean place to place the baby, even if not needed for warmth. Clothing appropriate for the weather, general rule is babies need one more layer than what is comfortable for you. More burp cloths than you think you will need (you will need them, babies leak a lot).

Feeding:
We also breast feed, and have breast pumps, both electric and manual. Depending on insurance, the cost of the pump may be covered in full. We do have a container of formula on hand for those nights when our babe is too hungry or mom is not around for whatever reason. It is very shelf stable stuff, and can be stocked deep, but the cost can be an issue. We have a portable food grinder so our baby can eat what we are eating, not an issue for you yet, but will start to be at around 6 months of age.

Transport:
Can be as simple as carrying, but a carrier such as a moby wrap, baby bjorn, etc. or a stroller can really help for a longer walk, or simply freeing up your hands to fight off the zombie hordes, for example. A stroller with some storage space on board is also nice, we also recently picked up a jogging stroller/bike trailer if such a bug out is in your plans. A car seat is of course a must for safe vehicle transport, we used a travel system that had a base in the car and a stroller that the car seat snapped into, very handy but gets heavy fast as your baby grows. A portable pack and play are great for traveling, not all hotels/friends/family will have a good place for baby to sleep.

Basically, you want to keep them fed, warm, clean and well rested, not unlike us.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 7:53 pm 
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Agree with pretty much everything here.

We also breastfed, I made sure I had a mechanical hand pump attachement, it was easier to take for certain short trips. You can actually hand-express with nothing but a clean container to catch the milk but that takes practice (ask me how I know...). Neither of my kids ever did have formula, but I had a can of it in the cupboard. Donated it once it was clear we wouldn't need it, food shelves will always take it.

When we had my first we were doing significant winter driving in the rural west - ie stuck in a ditch for 3 days wasn't crazy. We added a change of baby clothes and diapers/wipes to the car kits. My husband's car kit also had a six-pack of premixed formula and an empty bottle added.

The only thing I'd add would be some kind of sling or soft strap-baby-to-you device. No where near as heavy to carry as the carseat, and I could fit the kid under my coat to stay warm while wearing one.

A breastfed kid frequently gets started on a liquid vitamin early, might try to get an extra bottle of it.

Staying on top of the changes is going to be constant for the first couple years - their needs, sizes, and the relevant equipment is in constant flux.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 11:59 pm 
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Diaper liners - keeps the work on laundry days a bit easier.

Red Cross Adult and Pediatric First aid/CPR/AED - take the classes NOW

Childbirth classes are worth your time, esp if this is your first.

Talk with your pediatrician on what is appropriate for your FAK - one size doesn't fit all.

You both are going to be going through a life change you may having trouble believing. It's going to be the best and worst time of your lives.

Have fun, children are a blast! Best of luck!

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2015 9:43 am 
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Another thing I thought of- in a worst case scenario, you'll want ear protection for the little one. If there's any pew-pew going on, an infant's hearing could be permanently damaged.

Burp cloths and blankets, as Z Mace said. You can't have too many.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2015 9:49 am 
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Ear muffs work, I would not want to try ear plugs on an infant.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2015 2:53 pm 
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That's what I meant. Ear muffs.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2016 6:21 am 
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I wonder if the baby is in?

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:07 am 
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Congrats. Although away more than I was home their first few years, I think my babies experienced the skills of a natural prepper, their momma. Ever look inside a diaper bag? 120’ of climbing rope? Check. Carabiners? Swiss seat? Gloves? Check. Check. Check. How my mother ever did it with 11 is beyond me. Think how confusing it would be to edit and analyze the ration ledger.

I laugh to myself as I consider offering advice to another on this topic. My babies are focused on higher learning now, and I have never considered myself a very good parent. And I don’t like crying. And I have always been firm with my guidance: Stand back up. This type of encouragement is frowned upon these days if one were to peruse the Huffington Post, whose bloggers admonish those of us who tell our children to “shake it off.”

The Murkoff/Mazel book, “What to Expect” is worth having around if this is your first. As light fever may create such anxiety that you consider the three numbers 9-1-1. By the second child, pajamas on fire can be solved quickly with a wet dishrag and a baby aspirin will solve any problems short of a compound fracture or the eyeball hanging by a cord, having just popped out. You relax a bit, and visit the other three numbers, 7-1-1, to buy a fresh can of Cope and a 24 oz. metal container of the cold barley soup.

A good doctor, CPR, nursing and diaper management are all sound, essential even. Someone gave us a fantastic baby backpack that allowed us to walk miles and miles on beautiful beaches with a child laughing gently in my ear. Value? Priceless. The rest of it is already programmed into momma’s genetic code.

I realize that the “it’s complicated” category popularized in the 90’s is increasingly becoming the norm and that there will some that read this and scoff about being a “Single Unwed Father Raising Rabble Rousers (SUFR-R-R)” or Orphan, Unafraid of Challenging Habitat (OUCH), but I was fortunate to be raised by a mother that would extend her razor claws and expend her last coin to protect me. (How does one define love on a survival site?)

This is my advice. Watch your offspring take its first breath. Every emotion you have or can ever feel will be experienced in an instant. Then, take care of momma. Put her above self and all things. She is the glue that holds the unit together. This is the law of the jungle:

Lair-Right is the right of the Mother.
From all of her year she may claim
One haunch of each kill for her litter,
and none may deny her the same.
-R.K.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2016 9:19 pm 
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We found a small breast pump that was powered by AA batteries. A set of Eneloops and a charger kept it going for a long time.
Even if you do breastfeed have a can of formula as a backup. My wife got sick and her milk dried up and had to switch to formula and then forgot to take out can on an out of town trip to a small town that had nothing but a Walmart so we ended up paying twice the normal rate for the same size can (if you haven't been to a small town in the last few years Walmart moves in and undercuts the stores until they go out of business then raises their prices once there is no other choice). Don't buy the expensive similac etc, they spit up half of that, the Kroger organic was the best for the least amount of spit ups.
Each time we bought diapers I'll put a few in a bag in each vehicle along with some of those premixed formula. Extra onesies or other clothes.
You will need lots of meds, every time you take them to the doctor for shots they will tell you to give some pain relief (Tylenol, ibuprofen, etc). You'll most likely go through it. Walgreens will have buy one get one free a lot.

Don't forget your important paperwork. You'll have to have all that for the new doctor, preschool, kindergarten, etc. You get to start from the beginning. I bought a small report cover for each family member and sheet protectors, business card holders and cd holders and put them inside the report covers then put all of those in one zipper binder in my safe. The birth certificate goes in a sheet protector, ss card in the business card holder, flash drive, cr/dvd backup of the scans in there as well. Now when I need to take one child's paperwork I only pull that one out of the binder and take it leaving the rest in the safe, but should we need to evac we have everything in one place.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2016 6:50 pm 
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Comparatively little next to an adult. The big items (bulk) are going to be the stroller, and diaper refills. And to be honest, at that age, they can sleep in the stroller. Their load out is basically a diaper bag with refills. I have toddler twins, so this is what I did carry for an full day (multiple eat/sleep/poop cycles) outing

Diaper backpack (Dadgear, 30+L)
12 diapers (remember I have twins, so I'm loaded for two baby-days) + spares in car
100 pack wipes + 30 wipe spare mini-pack
Bottle Hand sanitizer
Full size changing pad (JL childress)
Tube of butt cream (e.g. A&D)
Misc. plastic bags for used diapers

Blowout kit consisting of:
two, from the skin out changes of clothing in separate gallon ziplock bags
disposable vinyl gloves
baby wash
spare shirt for Daddy

6 burp clothes (water proof)
6 premeasured dry formula servings
2 bottles distilled water
6 baby bottles

4 blankets
2 jackets
2 hat
2 pair booties

Comfort items (dolls, blankets, etc)
Multiple pacifiers on leashes

Stroller frame (e.g. Baby trend double snap-n-go)
Infant bucket that fits into stroller frame (e.g. BT flex-loc)
Alternately; wrap style baby carriers (Mody or baby K'tan) for the very young. Switch to Ergo and Mei Tai carriers as they get older. We used one in the cart and one in the carrier when we went shopping. Be careful about carrier styles as slings and crotch danglers can cause breathing and hip displasia problems if setup improperly.
Nylon straps (working belts in shopping carts and restaraunt child seats are exceedingly rare)

Ear plugs (+spares for unfortunate bystanders)
Coin purse full of quarters for vending machines
Gear repair kit (SAT/MT, duck tape, zipper repair kit)
Childrens' Tylonal
Gripe Water
thermometer
nail clippers and file
distraction for adults (one handed)

List of restaraunts that have changing tables in the mens room. Whoever came up with the concept of a single occupancy "family" restroom should be nutured/spade/castrated and sentenced to a lifetime of holding a screaming blowout while waiting in line for the family restroom.

EDIT: Good luck with your new free range recombinant DNA.
Lessons from BTDT Dad:
1) Establish shifts. You need at least 3 hours straight of sleep at a time to get any benefit.
2) Expect your normally pleasant other half to turn into a harpy for the first couple of weeks after birth as her hormones rebalance. Mine told me to eff off during a 2:30 AM diaper and bottle session.
3) Lower your housekeeping expectations. You're both exhausted, smell like s**t, and haven't showered in a week. As long as their dishes get done before they get moldy, and you have clean underwear, don't sweat it. Not kidding.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 4:16 pm 
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Close_enough wrote:
Lessons from BTDT Dad:
1) Establish shifts. You need at least 3 hours straight of sleep at a time to get any benefit.
2) Expect your normally pleasant other half to turn into a harpy for the first couple of weeks after birth as her hormones rebalance. Mine told me to eff off during a 2:30 AM diaper and bottle session.
3) Lower your housekeeping expectations. You're both exhausted, smell like s**t, and haven't showered in a week. As long as their dishes get done before they get moldy, and you have clean underwear, don't sweat it. Not kidding.

Ain't that the truth.

4) Adult pain meds. Between Mrs Sheddi and I we went through a 500-count bottle of acetaminophen and a similar amount of ibuprofen in the 12 months after our daughter was born (son 3 yrs earlier hadn't been such a problem or he might have remained an only child).

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 6:05 pm 
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Close_enough wrote:
2) Expect your normally pleasant other half to turn into a harpy for the first couple of decades after birth as her hormones rebalance.



Fixed it for ya :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2016 8:33 am 
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Congratulations!

Great advice in this thread. Simply put: Little people come with fluids and stuff. Our youngest just turned three. The hours can be slow but the years go fast.

Embrace your diaper bag and stroller. They'll be with you for years and can become your best friends. And be sure to check out an on-body baby carrier too. (I am still kicking myself for not using a carrier the first time around.)

I heartily second the advice to take a First Aid and CPR course, and I'll make one additional suggestion to the diaper bad packing list: An LED headlamp. Diaper changes and puke clean-up during power failures really suck and, and they make a great distraction for older kiddos!

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2016 2:45 am 
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bacpacjac wrote:
Congratulations!
An LED headlamp. Diaper changes and puke clean-up during power failures really suck and, and they make a great distraction for older kiddos!


QFT. I had to move the household flashlights into a locked drawer to keep them away from DD. I've also found that book lights, clamped to the edge of the changing table, work great for middle of the night diaper changes.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1935009044/ref ... 1933622717


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 08, 2017 6:56 am 
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When we just had 1 kid, a convertible backpack/duffel bag suffice as her BOB. Since having a baby recently again, I had to add more stuff. It wasn't that realistic to add another backpack especially since I'll be shouldering mttch of the weight.
What I did was make a baby centric main BOB in a light rolling suitcase. Call it a large glorified diaper bag with options to extend the stay.
Has the usual can of formula, bottles, clothes, diapers, bath stuff, etc but I added bottle cleansers, detergent. I also put the camp stove, utensils, plates & bowls; also things for the rest of the family like bath toiletries, extra set of clothes for each member, plus food for everyone since the stove and utensils are there.
We still have each of our own BOBs but having a rolling main one for baby stuff lightens the load on our backs. Instead of having a camp stove and a pot & pan in my backpack, we have Esbits and a big stainless cup which can be used personally or as backup to the main one.

Image

In the main BOB, the stove can also be used to heat bath water or sterilize baby stuff if need be.
Some awesome stuff though are the microwave sterilizer bags and also sterilizing tablets. Each bag is good for 20 uses. Just add water and put in the microwave with the bottles and items in side and it will steam sterilize them. Good to have if we end up in a hotel or someone else's place.
The sterilizing tablets, just drop 1 tab in 5 liters of water and soak the items for 15 minutes. The water is good for 24hrs and can be used continuously for the duration. I have a folding camp sink/bucket which I can use for this.

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