It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:13 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 1:13 am 
Offline
* *
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 1:14 am
Posts: 107
Location: Central MO
Has thanked: 21 times
Been thanked: 28 times
I always notice by littles get rashes more often and occasionally yeast infections when we were traveling with them (or if you would have to ration diapers/washing diapers and not change baby as often). They can get very bad and cause bleeding sores and worse infection if not treated (one of my daughters had one that got fairly bad while she was in the NICU), so I always took them seriously. My kid's doc was always good about supplying us with waaaaaay more Nystatin ointment than needed, it is cheap, and it lasts for a long time.

You can make or buy a small, padded wrap with a pouch in it for placing warm compresses if babies have colic to wrap around their tummy. Mine all had tummy issues and so I used one of those all the time. Plus, the compresses can be used for adults as well, so double-duty.

Baby-safe sunscreen and bug-spray alternatives would also be a good idea if traveling.

For food, they make infant safe mesh bags they can nom fruit and other liquid-rich foods through, which can cut down on having to have as much baby food on hand.

Lastly, and I know this may sound obvious, but something to keep them entertained/quiet. My kiddos are loud, loud, loud, and there are lots of emergency situations where you would need a child to be quiet.

I know this sounds like a lot of stuff, and I wouldn't and didn't carry all of this normally with me, but I think when we're talking about babies and bugging out or something more permanent, you should have more than some diapers, wipes, and a milk-filled boob.

_________________
"When you can't run, you crawl, and when you can't crawl..." "You find someone to carry you."

"She's tore up plenty, but she'll fly true."


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 10:52 am 
Offline
ZS Member
ZS Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:32 am
Posts: 1068
Location: Ontario, CAN
Has thanked: 88 times
Been thanked: 21 times
Kutter_0311 wrote:
Lots of good stuff here. I'll stress practice/training.

Every time you walk out the door, assume you won't be able to come back.

The more you realistically practice that, the better set you'll be when you really can't.

The baby will be more comfortable, too.

Mama does the same things each time, Mama moves surely and confidently.

Mama is calm, Baby is calm. All is well.

Mama is terrified, Baby is terrified. Screaming Baby stresses Mama out even more.

Slow is smooth, smooth is fast. Crawl, walk, run.


Lots of great about advice here about what to pack. I'll add a reminder that you have to carry it all, as well as the wee one. As Kutter suggests, practice and improvise, from what you pack, to how you pack it, and how you transport it. We've got three kids, all a decade apart, and it's amazing what you forget or take for granted. Not to mention, how out of shape we can get. ;)

Practice mock bug-outs, even if it's just a hike around the neighborhood. Go for a walk, set-up a day camp, have lunch from your pack, and let the babe take a nap. Do it as often as you can, seriously think about it before and after, makes tweaks along the way, and before you know it, you'll be more confident and it will become second nature.

_________________
“This is the part in the movie where that guy says, "Zombies? What zombies?" just before they eat his brains. I don't want to be that guy.” ― Holly Black, Kin

My Woods Bumming Kit / My Day Hike Pack/GHB / My Personal BOB / Our Family BOB / My Youtube Channel


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:50 am 
Online
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 3:45 pm
Posts: 2141
Has thanked: 1082 times
Been thanked: 300 times
Hey folks!

Does anybody have recommendations on good winter baby clothes? Canadians, I'm looking really hard at you all. But I"m open to anybody's experiences.

My baby will be born sometime in November, +/- whatever that little one feels like. We live in Nebraska, and visit northern Iowa and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

I am not impressed with most of the winter baby stuff I"m seeing in big box stores. It makes sense for more southern climates. I"ve started looking at Northface and poking around Canadian businesses to see what they have.

I"m also thinking we might make some swaddles out of heavier fleece or other better fabrics. I can't imagine babies in the 0-6 month range need a lot of pants, shirts, or boots. But really, this is our first baby, so if I"m way off, let me know.

I know there are issues with puffy jackets/clothes and car seats. I figure something like a swaddle/blanket would be more versatile. I also know there are some options for stuff that stays in the car seat and we might buy stuff if it is good quality, or make our own if the fabrics in our price range are sub-par.

Ok. Please point me in the right direction and let me know where my thinking might be off.

Typical temp ranges the baby would need to be comfortable in are usually around 40*F to -10*F (5*C to -23*C). I don't expect we will take our baby out much if temps are below 20*F (-7*C), except trips to and from the car or building. Temps can range down to -30*F (-35*C) in my expected AOs, but I really don't see us taking the baby out in that unless the building is on fire in the dead of winter.

We are also planning on using baby carriers and wraps more so than car seats for transport, so some of our body heat should help our baby out. I don't know if this is a factor or not.

Thanks for any advice!

_________________
*Remember: I'm just a guy on the internet :)
*Don't go to stupid places with stupid people & do stupid things.
*Be courteous. Look normal. Be in bed by 10'clock.

“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” -Bilbo Baggins.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:47 pm 
Offline
*
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2005 4:22 am
Posts: 68
Location: Earth
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 7 times
woodsghost wrote:
Hey folks!

Does anybody have recommendations on good winter baby clothes? Canadians, I'm looking really hard at you all. But I"m open to anybody's experiences.

My baby will be born sometime in November, +/- whatever that little one feels like. We live in Nebraska, and visit northern Iowa and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

I am not impressed with most of the winter baby stuff I"m seeing in big box stores. It makes sense for more southern climates. I"ve started looking at Northface and poking around Canadian businesses to see what they have.

I"m also thinking we might make some swaddles out of heavier fleece or other better fabrics. I can't imagine babies in the 0-6 month range need a lot of pants, shirts, or boots. But really, this is our first baby, so if I"m way off, let me know.

I know there are issues with puffy jackets/clothes and car seats. I figure something like a swaddle/blanket would be more versatile. I also know there are some options for stuff that stays in the car seat and we might buy stuff if it is good quality, or make our own if the fabrics in our price range are sub-par.

Ok. Please point me in the right direction and let me know where my thinking might be off.

Typical temp ranges the baby would need to be comfortable in are usually around 40*F to -10*F (5*C to -23*C). I don't expect we will take our baby out much if temps are below 20*F (-7*C), except trips to and from the car or building. Temps can range down to -30*F (-35*C) in my expected AOs, but I really don't see us taking the baby out in that unless the building is on fire in the dead of winter.

We are also planning on using baby carriers and wraps more so than car seats for transport, so some of our body heat should help our baby out. I don't know if this is a factor or not.

Thanks for any advice!



Well I live in Missouri so our weather isn't all that different from yours, and my wife swore by 4 basic things. A Infant Bundler for when you are using a carseat. A Quilted Bunting that works both in and out of a carseat, and her favorite the classic Moby Wrap, all paired with a stocking cap and some mittens for the fingers.
Put the kid in the something warm like some footie jammies, stick them in the Bunting with a stocking cap to help with the ears and mittens for the fingers, and use the Moby Wrap to keep them snug against mommy and you won't likely have any issues. And you can buy most of these items at Walmart for cheaper than where I linked to. I've got 4 kids and we used this with all of them and never has issues with keeping them warm.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:10 pm 
Offline
*
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:57 pm
Posts: 53
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 3 times
Would anyone consider bugging out with a very young child ? Absent the flames licking your house or the water coming up the drive way ...


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:58 pm 
Online
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 3:45 pm
Posts: 2141
Has thanked: 1082 times
Been thanked: 300 times
Brekar wrote:
Well I live in Missouri so our weather isn't all that different from yours, and my wife swore by 4 basic things. A Infant Bundler for when you are using a carseat. A Quilted Bunting that works both in and out of a carseat, and her favorite the classic Moby Wrap, all paired with a stocking cap and some mittens for the fingers.
Put the kid in the something warm like some footie jammies, stick them in the Bunting with a stocking cap to help with the ears and mittens for the fingers, and use the Moby Wrap to keep them snug against mommy and you won't likely have any issues. And you can buy most of these items at Walmart for cheaper than where I linked to. I've got 4 kids and we used this with all of them and never has issues with keeping them warm.


Thanks a TON for the advice. And let your wife know we are grateful too!

DJPrepper wrote:
Would anyone consider bugging out with a very young child ? Absent the flames licking your house or the water coming up the drive way ...


Yup. They don't do well on their own.

But seriously, what exactly is causing you to bug out? If something is so bad that staying in place is less palatable than staying home, then yes, please, take the child!

Also, bugging out may mean "going to the nearest hotel." We often think about heading to the nearest national park or the secret bug out land, but really, the things most likely to happen leave most of the local infrastructure intact so we can go visit friends, family, or a hotel, and I'd certainly be taking my child along.

What I hear is a deeper question: Are we less likely to bug out if we have a small child? Will we be more reluctant to bug out with a small child? Answer: Yes.

Children complicate things, but they don't change the basic decisions. Either the house is worth staying in, or it is not. So either you bug in, or bug out.

Honestly, I expect children complicate BOTH bugging in and bugging out. Which morphs the question from "do you bug out with children" to "how are they going to complicate my preps."

_________________
*Remember: I'm just a guy on the internet :)
*Don't go to stupid places with stupid people & do stupid things.
*Be courteous. Look normal. Be in bed by 10'clock.

“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” -Bilbo Baggins.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:02 pm 
Offline
*
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:57 pm
Posts: 53
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 3 times
DJPrepper wrote:
Would anyone consider bugging out with a very young child ? Absent the flames licking your house or the water coming up the drive way ...


woodsghost wrote:
What I hear is a deeper question: Are we less likely to bug out if we have a small child? Will we be more reluctant to bug out with a small child? Answer: Yes.

Children complicate things, but they don't change the basic decisions. Either the house is worth staying in, or it is not. So either you bug in, or bug out.

Honestly, I expect children complicate BOTH bugging in and bugging out. Which morphs the question from "do you bug out with children" to "how are they going to complicate my preps."



Yes, that is exactly what I am getting at.

My instincts would say that unless there is impending doom on your doorstep (or coming that way real soon), it would be better to stay put as it is much easier to take care of kids in familiar surroundings and with all available stores / resources close to hand.

What complicates this, however, is that here in Canada the Govt. can take someone below 18 if there is an Evacuation order.

So, if they coming knocking on the door there may be a choice between staying + having the Govt. take charge of any minors in the house or complying with the Evac order.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:02 pm 
Online
* * * * *
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 3:45 pm
Posts: 2141
Has thanked: 1082 times
Been thanked: 300 times
DJPrepper wrote:
DJPrepper wrote:
Would anyone consider bugging out with a very young child ? Absent the flames licking your house or the water coming up the drive way ...


woodsghost wrote:
What I hear is a deeper question: Are we less likely to bug out if we have a small child? Will we be more reluctant to bug out with a small child? Answer: Yes.

Children complicate things, but they don't change the basic decisions. Either the house is worth staying in, or it is not. So either you bug in, or bug out.

Honestly, I expect children complicate BOTH bugging in and bugging out. Which morphs the question from "do you bug out with children" to "how are they going to complicate my preps."



Yes, that is exactly what I am getting at.

My instincts would say that unless there is impending doom on your doorstep (or coming that way real soon), it would be better to stay put as it is much easier to take care of kids in familiar surroundings and with all available stores / resources close to hand.

What complicates this, however, is that here in Canada the Govt. can take someone below 18 if there is an Evacuation order.

So, if they coming knocking on the door there may be a choice between staying + having the Govt. take charge of any minors in the house or complying with the Evac order.


Well, if something is causing my government to declare an evacuation, I"m probably willing to leave, and take my children. However, that is a very personal decision and I really can't say I have a strong opinion of what *you* should do.

In America, some people ignore evacuation orders for hurricanes and floods. "Why" is beyond me. I think they don't like being inconvenienced by getting in a car and driving 300 km to a hotel to stay a few days. Probably 4 times out of 5 those people ride out the storm just fine and feel really smart and tough for having stayed when all the suckers left. However, frankly, when that really bad one hits and those people who stayed end up in a hospital or losing loved ones, I suspect they question some of their decisions.

I think a lot of people are reluctant to leave because they don't feel they have any place to go to. I sympathize with this, but I really encourage people to find hotels, and maybe share if finances are tight. Maybe find a campground 300 km away.

In my family, as I grew up, we would experience hurricanes. My dad did not like evacuating because he felt it was a nuisance and did not want to spend the $50-$100 for a hotel, especially if we were already vacationing and renting a place. My mom felt safety was paramount. As a child I liked escaping the howling winds and big bunch of scary outside. Besides, the TV worked better at the hotel.

Also, my parents discussing how they felt about incoming storms and hurricanes left a less secure, rather stressed feeling. I think as a child I did not like having crazy outside and tension inside the house.

For me and mine, if the government gives an evacuation order, I'm pretty sure we are leaving.

Now, on the other side of the coin, I don't know what the Canadian government calls evacuations for. If I had food and wood/gas stored up, then I would not evacuate for an ice or snow storm. I assume they give warnings for fires, floods, and hurricanes. I"d skeedadle for those.

Just where I'm at.

_________________
*Remember: I'm just a guy on the internet :)
*Don't go to stupid places with stupid people & do stupid things.
*Be courteous. Look normal. Be in bed by 10'clock.

“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” -Bilbo Baggins.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:15 pm 
Offline
*
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:57 pm
Posts: 53
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 3 times
woodsghost wrote:


Now, on the other side of the coin, I don't know what the Canadian government calls evacuations for. If I had food and wood/gas stored up, then I would not evacuate for an ice or snow storm. I assume they give warnings for fires, floods, and hurricanes. I"d skeedadle for those.

Just where I'm at.



The Govt's response is a mixed bag here, and there are quite a range of opinions depending on who you ask.

When it came to the Fire in Fort McMurray it was a no-brainer, in many areas the need to leave was very pressing and overall the evacuation was successful (although there was one tragic death in a road accident).

This year in B.C., however, produced more varied views. There was some flooding risk that really did not bear out and some people have questioned the evac in some fire areas : particularly those that wanted to stay and help defend their homes.

More controversially : there have been reports in a number of incidents now and past that very soon after an Evac order, Burglars come and rob homes. There are mixed views on how effective the Govt. was in response to this.

Even more controversially : an event some time ago saw the Govt. enter homes to seize firearms post an Evac (High River 2013).

http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/hig ... ated-homes

While that has not re-occurred as far as I know, this event is still very much remembered.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group