Dealing with picky eaters

A place to discuss special considerations involved prepping and reacting to a disaster with children, pets and other family concerns.

Moderator: ZS Global Moderators

Post Reply
User avatar
LyraJean
* * *
Posts: 604
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:30 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: Night of the Living Dead (Sidney Poitier)
Shaun of the Dead
ZombieLand
Location: South Florida
Contact:

Dealing with picky eaters

Post by LyraJean » Mon Jul 30, 2018 10:14 pm

My son pretty much eats about 6 things. He is almost 7 years old. My husband is not picky but he gets food boredom? pretty quickly. He doesn't really eat leftovers. How do you deal with picky eaters? Any suggestions on how to get them to be less picky without risking starvation?
My blog: Beyond Tourism: Florida's Yesteryear A blog about Florida History

absinthe beginner
* * * * *
Posts: 1797
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:05 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Shawn of the Dead
Location: Colorado

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by absinthe beginner » Mon Jul 30, 2018 11:33 pm

I suspect in the PAW, that will be a self-correcting problem.

I remember my grandmother telling me about her younger brother who was a picky eater growing up. Then he was drafted, sent to Korea, and became a POW in a Chinese camp. When he eventually came back home, he ate everything that was put in front of him, gratefully.

User avatar
Ellywick
* *
Posts: 252
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 1:14 am
Location: Central MO

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by Ellywick » Tue Jul 31, 2018 8:27 am

I have a lot of experience with this. Two out of my three kiddos are picky eaters and my son (who is 7 now) was so bad at one point that he was diagnosed with ARFID (Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder). And it wasn't a, "starve him out" type of thing. He was already starving himself, at failure to thrive weight, and would automatically vomit anything up that wasn't one of the 5 foods he would eat. It wasn't being bratty; it had become a literal food phobia.

First, I would check with kiddo's pediatrician and make sure he doesn't have GERD. Lots of children suffer from it silently, in particular children born premature. Boys are also more likely to have GERD as children than girls. Also, if he has any other GI issues (like chronic constipation) that needs to get addressed. Food allergies that result in GI or dermatological issues versus anaphylaxis are also important to rule out. All of of these issues can result in restrictive food habits. My son had all three.

If all of those are ruled out or even if he has some of them and still had developed strong mental blocks to foods due to GI issues, behavioral interventions can help. My son went to a feeding therapist for a while. We still use several of her tricks. Here are a few:
1) Rather than start with completely new foods, start with preferred foods in new forms. For example, we began by getting him to eat different shaped chicken nuggets or trying tater tots instead of French fries. Then, we could introduce mashed/baked potatoes after he liked tater tots.
2) Give a preferred food reward or other reward after eating a small amount of new food type. My son got to play with a toy for a couple minutes, eat one skittle, or watch a few minutes of a show between 3-5 bites.
3) Watch out for texture. Texture is huge. Start out with new foods that have a preferred texture. My kiddo likes crispy foods, so most new meats or things like that are introduced with a crispy texture.
4) Go through the senses with the first several bites of a new food. My son looks, touches, smells, and then tastes bites of new food
5) At least at the beginning, serve your kiddo a new food in whatever way they like. We've been working on brocolli with my son. He will eat it now, but only with butter, garlic, salt, and cut into tiny pieces. Eventually, I'll start moving him towards trying it different ways, but now that's the way I make it for him.

My kiddo is now at the point where he is still picky, but not dangerously so to his health. He will try a few bites of new things without any of the above interventions about half the time. Most importantly, he is growing and catching up to his peers in weight and size, although he is still a skinny britches.

It is highly likely your son isnt as bad off as mine was, but hopefully some of this info is helpful.
"When you can't run, you crawl, and when you can't crawl..." "You find someone to carry you."

"She's tore up plenty, but she'll fly true."

User avatar
MacWa77ace
ZS Global Moderator
ZS Global Moderator
Posts: 2218
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:39 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: The Omega Man, I Am Legend, Dawn of the Dead v1974.
Location: South East Florida
Contact:

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by MacWa77ace » Tue Jul 31, 2018 10:25 am

absinthe beginner wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 11:33 pm
I suspect in the PAW, that will be a self-correcting problem.

I remember my grandmother telling me about her younger brother who was a picky eater growing up. Then he was drafted, sent to Korea, and became a POW in a Chinese camp. When he eventually came back home, he ate everything that was put in front of him, gratefully.
Definitely

ETA
My Uncle was a POW of the Japanese in WWII. After he finally escaped, he never ate rice, maggots, boll weevils or jellyfish again for the rest of his life.
Lifetime gamer watch at:
MacWa77ace YouTube Channel


Image
Image

JT42
*
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 9:55 pm

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by JT42 » Tue Jul 31, 2018 12:08 pm

(Referring to his time in Vietnam): "I spent the next three years in a POW camp, forced to subsist on a thin stew made of fish, vegetables, prawns, coconut milk, and four kinds of rice. I came close to madness...

trying to find it here in the states, but they just can't get the spices right."

-Seymour Skinner

grumpyviking
* * *
Posts: 532
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 5:47 am
Location: rural UK

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by grumpyviking » Thu Nov 29, 2018 8:49 am

there wont be any fussy eaters after SHTF ! they'll eat what their given and be grateful for it.
some people that prefer to be alone are not anti social they just have no time for Drama, Stupidity and false people.

colmer
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2017 4:24 am

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by colmer » Wed Mar 20, 2019 5:35 pm

absinthe beginner wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 11:33 pm
I suspect in the PAW, that will be a self-correcting problem.

I remember my grandmother telling me about her younger brother who was a picky eater growing up. Then he was drafted, sent to Korea, and became a POW in a Chinese camp. When he eventually came back home, he ate everything that was put in front of him, gratefully.
That's one good way to bent somebody's habit.

User avatar
Slugg
* * * * *
Posts: 1803
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 12:35 pm
Location: Georgia

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by Slugg » Sun Mar 24, 2019 4:33 am

We have one child that is slightly picky at eating and one that eats everything she is given. Fortunately for us the picky eating isn't too severe. He will gag on something he doesn't like, but nothing beyond that. With him we prepare food, if he doesn't like that food it goes into the fridge. When he states he is hungry again we reheat the same food and put it in front of him. That gets repeated until he eats it. No snacks until he puts fourth an honest effort and eats a meal. At the same time we don't just force feed him things he doesn't like to give him a more diverse palate. His also isn't an allergy or other issue because I've mixed foods he doesn't like into other foods and he doesn't mind. He hates the consistency of bananas but doesn't notice them in pancakes for example.
Just keep livin

plagaboy
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2019 8:06 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: Dawn of the Dead, 28 Days Later, 28 Weeks Later, Shawn of the Dead, Zombieland.
Location: Venezuela

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by plagaboy » Fri Apr 19, 2019 4:44 pm

absinthe beginner wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 11:33 pm
I suspect in the PAW, that will be a self-correcting problem.

I remember my grandmother telling me about her younger brother who was a picky eater growing up. Then he was drafted, sent to Korea, and became a POW in a Chinese camp. When he eventually came back home, he ate everything that was put in front of him, gratefully.
This, I've seen it here in my country, hunger always wins. Desperation can work miracles in the way people see things and their willingness to ingest them.

RoneKiln
* * * * *
Posts: 1145
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 3:20 am

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by RoneKiln » Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:59 pm

I was a picky eater, we were poor, and my parents couldn't cook for crap (except my Dad was always awesome at cooking breakfasts). I got good at foraging for dandelion leaves, clover, and a flower I mistakenly thought was honeysuckle (still not sure what it is). I also ate straight out of our garden a lot and my Dad turned a blind eye to it. There was once a week long period that I only ate what I found myself (it was not a good week).

Might be a good idea to teach them some local wild food to forage. In addition to giving them more nutrients, it would help them regain a sense of control in bad times.

I'm still pretty picky though I've improved a lot. It's why I usually do most of the cooking in my relationships.
"Seriously the most dangerous thing you are likely to do is to put salt on a Big Mac right before you eat it and to climb into your car."
--Raptor

egghunter
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:50 am

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by egghunter » Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:10 pm

What I do is I decorate the food or mash whatever they don't want to eat (let's say broccoli) and turn it into different shapes. That worked for me.

casro
*
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:59 pm

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by casro » Tue Jan 12, 2021 2:47 pm

LyraJean wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 10:14 pm
My son pretty much eats about 6 things. He is almost 7 years old. My husband is not picky but he gets food boredom? pretty quickly. He doesn't really eat leftovers. How do you deal with picky eaters? Any suggestions on how to get them to be less picky without risking starvation?
In my experience parents can sometimes be a bit responsible.

I was a little picky even in my adult years. My family eats meat heavily, everyday without skipping one. In our table we used to have something to eat along that could be pasta, lasagna, grilled whatever, sausages, rice and beans, I don't know. But accompanied by lot of steak. I didn't feel like eating fruits or vegetables since I was born. To avoid nutrients deficiency, my mother would blend a lot of vegetables into a a mashed mix that would be served with rice and beans. Otherwise I wouldn't have it. Grew up spoiled this way.

I went to a military school and believe it or not, you are not forced to eat whatever. There's a line where you can serve yourself with whatever you feel like. As there was usually meat, rice, some sort of carbs, I was also ok skipping salad, vegetables and fruits.

I married a chef. She is as foodie as it gets and it was killing her having to put up with a baby. She'd try to convince me by attacking manly values saying stuff like real men should eat anything. That really bothered her because she wished she could cook a bunch of stuff she would like to try or test but couldn't knowing I despised almost all crazy ingredients. She wouldn't cook for herself only because it would have been too much food for one and I would end up ordering a hamburger in protest either becoming very fat quickly or considering why are we even married in the first place? Besides, my family raises cattle. We find sort of offensive when we see others cutting fat out or destroying steaks unaware of how many people and how much work is put into getting that meat with that precise standard. We also respect animals and get likewise offended knowing how cattle is slaughtered to then see people throwing half of their meat in the garbage because they decided they are ok and had enough. My wife begun appealing to my sense of respect for meat reminding me food is food and that to throw stuff away is likewise disrespectful to those in need of it.

My number one hobby is driving. I love to drive excessively fast going through mountain curves to different small towns where she gets to find very local and fresh ingredients. We combine our two hobbies having fun together as I chauffeur her to these places. Visiting these different shops I sometimes tried one new thing here another there. She payed attention to what I disliked having isolated as acidity, excess bitterness, whatever. She would then try to come up with a crazy recipe neutralizing these off-flavors. Many times she would hit it getting me to enjoy something made with "distasteful" ingredients. As a step 2 she would accentuate this off-flavors more and more, bit by bit until I finally got used to it.

I don't say I like everything but in a process of less than 5 years she made me at least to try it all. Besides, liking or not, I nowadays eat whatever is put in front of me because I still don't feel comfortable wasting food. When I visit my parents, I can see my siblings are still very picky. They even joke at my expense with nonsense saying I eat crap and disgusting stuff for whatever reasons but I don't even argue back because it's close to impossible change grown-up adults.

PAW or not, in my personal opinion I wouldn't allow my children to grow up as spoiled as I was.

User avatar
Mannlicher
* *
Posts: 194
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:53 am
Location: N. Central Fl.

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by Mannlicher » Fri Mar 26, 2021 4:31 pm

if they are hungry, they will eat. Simple as that.

IAmOne
*
Posts: 28
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2020 3:03 pm
Favorite Zombie Movies: The Dead Outside
Location: A smallish island to the West of Europe.

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by IAmOne » Sat Mar 27, 2021 7:34 am

Mannlicher wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 4:31 pm
if they are hungry, they will eat. Simple as that.
That's fairly consistently been shown not to be the case.
Insert here a quote, Hemingway or Orwell, maybe Atwood that will really, really irritate someone.

grumpyviking
* * *
Posts: 532
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 5:47 am
Location: rural UK

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by grumpyviking » Sat Mar 27, 2021 8:10 am

its a problem mainly of the modern western world, our ancient ancestors ate about 2,000 different foods , modern humans eat less than 200, some people a lot less than that.
growing up we ate what was "in season" if it wasnt in season we didnt have it to eat, now stuff is shipped in from all over the world, children have been allowed to eat what they want not what their given, no wonder their "picky eaters".
some people that prefer to be alone are not anti social they just have no time for Drama, Stupidity and false people.

User avatar
sheddi
ZS Global Moderator
ZS Global Moderator
Posts: 3600
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2007 6:33 am
Favorite Zombie Movies: 28 Days Later
Shaun of the Dead
Location: Hampshire, England

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by sheddi » Sat Mar 27, 2021 12:16 pm

grumpyviking wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 8:10 am
its a problem mainly of the modern western world, our ancient ancestors ate about 2,000 different foods , modern humans eat less than 200, some people a lot less than that.
growing up we ate what was "in season" if it wasnt in season we didnt have it to eat, now stuff is shipped in from all over the world, children have been allowed to eat what they want not what their given, no wonder their "picky eaters".
When did you grow up, the 1400s?

The UK has been importing food since pre-industrial times. Fray Bentos started selling corned beef in the UK in 1899 while Dole started canning and distributing pineapples more than a century ago. Even during WW2 there were huge food imports (stopping them was the goal of the U-boat fleet).

No-one currently living in the UK has been limited to locally-grown seasonal foods, unless by choice.
Be Pure!
Be Vigilant!
Behave!


Member
ZSC:010 - UK Chapter
Grid tie solar PV in southern England
Foundation licence holder - Mike-Six-mumble-mumble-mumble.

grumpyviking
* * *
Posts: 532
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 5:47 am
Location: rural UK

Re: Dealing with picky eaters

Post by grumpyviking » Sun Mar 28, 2021 3:18 am

sheddi wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 12:16 pm
grumpyviking wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 8:10 am
its a problem mainly of the modern western world, our ancient ancestors ate about 2,000 different foods , modern humans eat less than 200, some people a lot less than that.
growing up we ate what was "in season" if it wasnt in season we didnt have it to eat, now stuff is shipped in from all over the world, children have been allowed to eat what they want not what their given, no wonder their "picky eaters".
When did you grow up, the 1400s?

The UK has been importing food since pre-industrial times. Fray Bentos started selling corned beef in the UK in 1899 while Dole started canning and distributing pineapples more than a century ago. Even during WW2 there were huge food imports (stopping them was the goal of the U-boat fleet).

No-one currently living in the UK has been limited to locally-grown seasonal foods, unless by choice.
if someone grew up before the era of supermarkets choice was very limited, now there is too much choice. when I was very young we still had rationing. I didnt see my first supermarket until I was 23, married and paying a mortgage, that supermarket was very small, they still are around here.
TBH I only go to the supermarket once a month to buy canned and packaged stuff, I never buy supermarket meat and the so called "fresh" fish is anything but and the quality of their fruit and veg is debateable.
living in a rural area I buy my meat, eggs and veg straight off the farm.
some people that prefer to be alone are not anti social they just have no time for Drama, Stupidity and false people.

Post Reply

Return to “Family Prep”