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PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 4:41 am 
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Bethlehem wrote:
My point is that you shouldn't let some doctor tell you that there is no medical reason for Autism... like his neurologist did! We've seen it make a difference first hand.


Well I agree with that, I would hope the Doctor would phrase it thus: There is no yet confirmed underlying genetic or environmental cause or causes for Autism.

He should not have said there was no medical reason for Autism, but there are scammers out there, and one thing they all can sell well is certainty, they know X caused Y and their product Q will solve the problem, you need only look at the Wakefield case to see that people are willing to use Autism for financial gain.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:10 pm 
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There is an alternate school of thought on the anti-Candida diet. Everyone should do their own research on this issue. I would be very skeptical of anyone offering a cure to autism.

http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRel ... ndida.html


Please bear in mind that I didn't mean to say anyone was offering a cure for Autism. I'm talking about parents of and people on the spectrum who I know have rid themselves of yeast and say that it makes a huge difference. It's been three weeks on the Candida diet and my son has said more in the last two days than he's said in the last year. If nothing else, he is at least more comfortable and therefore more likely to listen and interact. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that yeast plays a part in his behavior. I've seen it first hand and it was a nightmare. I hate depriving him of the food he likes but what a difference it made!

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:52 pm 
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I am going to put a stick right in this honest nest.
I hear so much talk of curing Autism and Aspergers that it has become my number one pet peave.
I have high function Autism or Aspergers if you will. So does my son.
We are not broken, we do not need to be fixed or cured.
Are there some things in life that are difficult? Yes. Bit I am pretty sure everyone else has difficulties as well.
First thing to remember; no to people on the Autism spectrum are the same. Just like no two people from anywhere are the same.
Please don't fit us all in a little labeled box.
Now, just like the rest of you there are things in our life, or autistic traits we'd like to improve. But can't you say the same things about yourself ?
You want to help your child with symptoms, please do. My son hates loud noises, so I give him ear plugs at church when everyone sings. At the same time he can pick out a conversation across a crowded noisy room. He doesn't want to be cured.

Here is a link to one of my favorite article on this subject:
http://marimouth.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/aspergers-syndrome-cure-or-acceptance/

Sorry if I offended anyone, but this thread has offended me at times.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 4:20 pm 
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Well, it seems that everyone has been offended after my first post in this thread. For the record, in case anyone missed it, I have Aspergers too. My son has Autism. I'm proud of my special capabilities that most other people don't have and I'm raising my son to be proud too. BUT, my son can't speak yet. He's almost 5 years old and it has seriously limited his learning. I'm not trying to "cure" him. I just want to help him develop the coping mechanisms he's going to need to get by in life. And the diet is helping with his speech and ADHD. There's no question about it. That doesn't mean the diet can cure Autism, just that the discomfort of the yeast issue was standing between him and his progress. Perhaps my choice of words was hasty.

People with Autism aren't stupid, and those with Asperger's usually have above average IQs and many are considered geniuses. I never meant to offend anyone, just point out some things that can make life easier for those who have an issue like this. My issue is social discomfort. My son lacks speech thus far and has some sensory issues like loud noises etc. You're right... no two people are the same regardless of where they are on the spectrum. Personally I think the spectrum is far too wide and too many of us are lumped into the group labeled "Autistic". It ranges from super genius to mental retardation for crying out loud.

To answer the original question regarding prepping. If your loved ones have any issues like the yeast or food allergies just keep it in mind. You are the best judge and only you know exactly what you're dealing with.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 4:56 pm 
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Bethlehem.
I wasn't lashing at you or any other single individual. I was lashing at the paradigm of 'cure Autism'.
Yes iI caught on about you and your son. (btw my son didnt talk early on, now he won't stop talking).

I agree there are issues with wheat or the way we process wheat. My GF has a terrible wheat allergy. One flake of wheat and she looks 9 months pregnant..

My issue is where do we draw the line in the name of helping people?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 5:21 pm 
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I understand. :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 11:02 pm 
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Popping in to remind folks that this is *not* an appropriate place to debate whether or not to cure autism. If you think you can do that without veering into politics, then perhaps a better subforum might be Off Topic. This thread should focus on preparation strategies for people who have autism, or people who are caretakers of people who have autism. While I don't mind some wobbling on topic, I feel this is threatening to veer into different territory.

Further posts debating whether or not to cure (and I do understand and respect that this is an important issue) will be split off into a separate topic, which will be moved to off topic (since I don't think it's "Random Stupid Bullshit"). Please respect my time and do not force me to do this; let's keep this topical to what preparations one can make for family members/friends/people you may care for with autism.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 11:40 pm 
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Understood.

As for prepping; each autistic person will have his or her own special needs. Understanding those needs is where to start.

For my son, I have to be ready to protect him from noise.
In a SHTF situation I need to keep him isolated from strangers because he will go into sensory overload. Also because he has no governor on his mouth and he will say something to get us killed.

Most autistic people have something they do for stimming. I know i need to have those things available for him so he doesn't melt down.

Last is food. He is a VERY picky eater. Once my stores run out he could easily starve to death by refusing to eat.

On the plus side he needs to know everything, no surprises. Once he knows what going on he has a VERY analytical mind and is a huge asset.
He is also very devoted to a task and he is a hard worker.

Like anyone else in my family i have to know his strengths and weakness.

What do you do to take care of them at home? Plan to do the same when TSHTF

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 9:48 am 
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My brother who is somewhere on the Autism spectrum. He was first labeled Failure to Thrive when he was born in 1982. He didn't start talking until he was 4. He has problems making eye contact with people and having face to face conversations. The easiest way to speak with him is via texting or over the computer otherwise you get monosyllable answers.

He is 30 years old now, while he will probably never be completely independent, I don't even think he wants to live on his own. He is actually really good with money. He just started a business where he buys liquid laundry detergent at wholesale and sells it at the flea market at retail. He also is able to focus on individual topics. He is an avid coin collector but don't think you can take advantage of him. He will be very straight with you in the fact that he knows what he is talking about. This focus has helped him invest in the stock market as well.

I introduced him to prepping through the Dies the Fire books. He made the connection that it was like the show, "Life Without People" but the people are still there. I told him hey if your laundry detergent doesn't work you can always use for yourself or use it as a trade good if the world ends. He liked that idea. And now we talk about what we would do if the world ends on a regular basis if the topic comes up.

While the end of the world is scary as all get out, I try not to focus on that aspect when talking to him. I don't want to freak him out unnecessarily. He tends to focus hard like I said and he would worry about incessantly. We live in different states so I hope and I know it is slim that nothing so bad happens that I would not be able to get to him if something happens to my mom and our step-dad before I or my dad can get there.

So, any tips on talking about the scary stuff without totally freaking him out? He does travel alone perfectly fine both by bus and plane. He doesn't know how to drive though. We are very close so I do worry about him.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 7:33 am 
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Lyrajean,
Great story. Your brother sounds awesome.
As for tips i have 2: don't focus on the scary stuff. Instead play 'what if' games. It gets you always thinking and prepared without focusing on doom and gloom. I do this with my son a lot. What if someone breaks in. What if the house caught fire. What if the stores ran out of food. His mind focuses on the reaction to these things without the anxiety.
Second, in your preps plan to treat him just like you have for 30 years. Don't plan on him being something he isn't. That should go for everyone not just autistic people.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:51 pm 
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I have Asperger's. I am not broken. I see things that you overlook. I hear all conversations simultaneously. Animals take to me because I can empathize with them. Am I broken? No, I am better. Social niceties are overrated. I remember everything that I learn and where I learned it. Neurotypicals should be so lucky to have what I have. Your yeast hypothesis is ridiculous. Your kid has a reaction to gluten, not yeast and curbing the intake won't 'cure' autism.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 10:14 am 
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Note there is a good thread on this subject in CP&P. It is referenced here.

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=106290&p=2424315#p2424315

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PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 4:19 pm 
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I came across something really excellent for Autistic people. Chewing on things can be helpful with anxiety in Autistic people and others. Unfortunately most of the chewing items out there are intended for kids. They tend to be larger and more kid like. Not necessarily something you want as an adult. Thankfully I came across a more adult friendly product line called Chewigem. It's various types of silicone jewelry designed to be chewed on.

http://www.chewigemusa.com/

They were originally designed for teething babies. The lady who designed them wanted something for her baby to chew on that wasn't her regular necklace. She eventually found out that other kinds of people would benefit from a more discrete chewing thing. So they started marketing them to autistic community.

I have the treadbangle which I purchased on amazon. It's an amazing product. :clap: :awesome: it's amazing how well chewing on a piece of silicone helps with my anxiety. I currently have the treadbangle in my EDC. It wont fit on my wrist so I carry it in my fanny pack in the case it came in. I am also thinking of getting one of the pendants or dog tags. I currently wear a dog tag with my medical info as well as a ZS dog tag. So a dog tag shaped chewing thing would fit right in. Unfortunately the dog tags don't come in purple. :( But they do have pink camo; which is ok I guess. If you (or someone you know) is autistic, or has ADD, or whatever; I would give the chewigem products a try. I will definitely need to get an extra to stick in a bugout bag.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 4:12 pm 
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callista - I have been a lurker/reader on this board for a very long time, and this post has been the impetus to bring me to finally register. TY so much for posting the topic, it's near and dear.

As adding to the thread, my grandson is autistic - with the usual food focuses. His are primarily soft (no loud/crunchy!) foods, with white/pale foods preferred - ie white bread, vanilla cake, chicken (no red meats), etc. So I have stocked the white whole wheat grains instead of the brown, white navy beans, pastas, canned chicken, rice, etc. As we are able to expand his tastes ( a slow process but still progress) the larder will expand with him.

And head phones. They are priceless when noise gets to be too much for him to handle. They don't have to be attached to anything to work. They just tone down his sensory input to a level he can contend with - for example, he wears them at the movies so the volume isn't so loud.

It's good to know there is more in the community that has this in common. Thanks all of you!


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 4:20 pm 
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Pithy_Prepper wrote:
callista - I have been a lurker/reader on this board for a very long time, and this post has been the impetus to bring me to finally register. TY so much for posting the topic, it's near and dear.

As adding to the thread, my grandson is autistic - with the usual food focuses. His are primarily soft (no loud/crunchy!) foods, with white/pale foods preferred - ie white bread, vanilla cake, chicken (no red meats), etc. So I have stocked the white whole wheat grains instead of the brown, white navy beans, pastas, canned chicken, rice, etc. As we are able to expand his tastes ( a slow process but still progress) the larder will expand with him.

And head phones. They are priceless when noise gets to be too much for him to handle. They don't have to be attached to anything to work. They just tone down his sensory input to a level he can contend with - for example, he wears them at the movies so the volume isn't so loud.

It's good to know there is more in the community that has this in common. Thanks all of you!

I have a pair of howard leight ear muffs that work great when my auditory sensitivities are particularly bad. As an added bonus I have hearing protection should I end up at a gun range.

I may also look into aviation style headsets so I can deal with noise and operate my ham radio.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 12:27 am 
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I found with my brother that if you give him a problem to work it helps him focus. So my mom gardens and my brother decided to focus on food. He decided to see if you could grow more beans by using dry beans you buy at the grocery store. He never got back to me so I don't know how that turned out.

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I'd say deal with the known issues first. If they need to chew or are hearing sensitive or require the "autism blanket" make sure they have what they need to deal with those issues conditioning wise, that they have any specialized items they need in their BOB and get them training with and used to the added weight burden.

Other than that my personal experience with helping those with special needs is simply treating them like responsible people with expectations. The more you gentley push with "try this" type motivation the more you get, to the point where you will be surprised. My grandfather managed to get my cousin with downs eating on her own and doing house work when previously she was unable to talk in a way understandable to average people and she ate out of a feeding tube. She is now gainfully employed at a packing facility and stocks shelves part time because she has become a little capitalist (paid off the house when she realized the GIC's she inherited weren't worth keeping compared to the mortgage). I suspect greater developments could be achieved with autism which is usually intellectually less debilitating and offers more detail oriented abilities.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 10:47 pm 
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greenear123 wrote:
.....

He has gradually come around to the whole idea. Prepping has become the routine. He is making his own BOB, has his own gear and is learning new skills. Like fire building, scary, and driving the cars, scarier.


Can I suggest you ease into practicing with this gear? Making a short camping trip, or overnights in the backyard to start, with plenty of advance notice. You may already be doing this, if so, I'll go back to lurking. The topic interests me, mainly because I've had students with varying levels of Asperger's. Understanding it better can only help me help them.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:04 pm 
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Glad to see this topic is still active. One thing I have been pondering is an autism first aid kit. It would contain things needed to deal with meltdown, sensory sensitivities, and commications difficulties, as well as injuries that require immediate attention. It would be in an easy to identify bag that is easy to get to.

I also recently found out about about a medic alert bracelet that has your info embedded in a QR code. It's called My ID Square. https://www.myidsquare.com My therapist told me about it. An autistic client of hers had one. It appently had pretty detailed info explaining theur verbal speech issues and whatnot. They also come in dog tag format. I am thinking one for my wrist and one to hang from the autism first aid kit.


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I've been told by a psychiatrist that I should have been diagnosed as Asperger's or high-functioning autistic rather than ADHD, but I'm not too worried about the exact situation. I'm definitely one of the sorts who doesn't deal well with too much sensory stimulation. These are just a few ideas, mostly what I do:

Things that are ALWAYS in my purse:
  • ear plugs that were specifically made for my ears (the ones they pour in - for some people, that process may be too much, I wasn't fond of the pressure while they were doing it)
  • "fidgets" - things I can mess with when I'm feeling anxious or start twitching
  • some sort of smelly - essential oils. I've messed with the ones recommended for anxiety and will put them on my necklace or wrists to help make my brain shut up
  • Benadryl - 'cause if I get to the panicky point, forced sleep is much better than no sleep. I don't do well without enough sleep. Plus allergies suck and I'm flat out useless when I can't breathe.
  • Pens and index cards or notebooks - because writing things down helps my brain order them and process things
  • During the winter, something soft and heavy lives in the car or near me at practically all times. I have a heavy cloak that makes me feel calmer just putting it on, along the lines of a weighted blanket.
  • Snacks - I normally have a Larabar with me at the very least. The idea of being somewhere where I can't find something I can or will eat stresses me out, so I make sure I don't have to worry about it. If we're travelling, I bring my own kettle, coffee, and tea, because I don't like some coffees. On our last trip, I had a basket in the back seat with individual packs of pretzels, jerky, and crackers that I know I like. Cheaper than buying stuff at gas stations, and I don't have to inspect labels to see if I can find stuff that I can eat or risk not liking something.
  • Pocket knife
  • Flashlight
  • Kindle and/or tablet with a rather large external battery so I needn't worry about electronics dying on me over basically a whole weekend

I'm also the first one to hear random noises or realize that a diving tank is still cracked open. I notice when something smells or looks different from usual because that's not the way it is supposed to be (side note, I've also freaked out on people who moved things that I needed left where they were - even my husband won't mess with my bathroom counter or "nests" unless absolutely necessary, and he then puts everything that is there in a box and tells me exactly where it is rather than trying to put things up). I have an obsession with planning travel, including what is going to be packed where, because I like knowing where everything is.

I'm not sure how I'd do in a SHTF situation. The fact that I'm cute and quite verbal has saved my bacon in quite a few cases, but I'm not sure how well that will work when I'm stressed and twitching. Most people who interact with me just think I'm slightly odd, unless they see me when I'm stressed out and not dealing with life well. There are also some situations that I *don't* stress out about that I should, and I think it's because my brain realizes that if I did start freaking out in those situations, it would go runaway on me and I'd be done for the day.

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dizie wrote:
I am a little worried how he would handle a power outage. The idea of cutting off the power is a good dry run(and saves money :D ).


A bit late, but I just wanted to comment on this.

Power outages freak me out, and since we live in the country, they're a part of life when storms come through. I keep a flashlight in my purse, next to my bed, and in the arm of the chair I normally sit in. I know exactly where the candles are. I have a 20,000 mAh charging battery that I can use for anything that charges by USB (and I can keep things charged for a full weekend if need be), and my phone and tablet both have their own data service. I like watching historical documentaries and reading books on how people lived before electricity, which 1) reassures me that I can if I have to, and 2) teaches me random things that could be useful (like if you put a bit of wood ash and water into a greasy pan, it will form soap and help clean it).

Yes, I still get a bit anxious...but I also know I'll make it through and can keep it under control. If it's in the evening, which tends to be common, I'll often just go to bed.

It won't work if SHTF, but if our power is out for more than overnight, I have the option of going to stay with my parents in town. I don't do well in the heat, so if it goes out during the summer during the day, I end up taking random trips into town just so I can be in the AC.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 1:33 am 
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CG wrote:
[*]During the winter, something soft and heavy lives in the car or near me at practically all times. I have a heavy cloak that makes me feel calmer just putting it on, along the lines of a weighted blanket.


For a while I have thought about getting a hooded cloak. But I have been hesitant because I want to be seen as a D&D reject. I really need get over my self consciousness when it comes to disability aids. That's why I avoid using the assistive communication app on my phone. I will wander around a store looking for something rather than have my phone ask an employee where it is.

I really need to put ear plugs back in my EDC. I was in San Francisco over the holidays and popped into the mall. I had to leave as soon as I walked in, due to the noise. I normally use headphones and heavy metal to drown out background noise. But sometimes quiet would be better. I am thinking of switching my EDC pack from my Maxpedition Noatak Gearslinger back to my milsurp MOLLE Assault Pack. Since I will have more room. I might go ahead and EDC my earmuff hearing protectors. I just hope I don't feel self conscious using them.


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My nephew is an Aspie. My brother and his wife were initially resistant to acknowledging what was clearly self-evident, until I gave them a copy of the poignant but often hilarious book "Look Me in the Eye" by John Elder Robison, who has become a prominent voice for Aspies. "Aspies" don't need fixing, but they do need structure and people around them who understand what they are dealing with and who can help them achieve their often unique potential.

http://jerobison.blogspot.mx


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:37 pm 
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absinthe beginner wrote:
My nephew is an Aspie. My brother and his wife were initially resistant to acknowledging what was clearly self-evident, until I gave them a copy of the poignant but often hilarious book "Look Me in the Eye" by John Elder Robison, who has become a prominent voice for Aspies. "Aspies" don't need fixing, but they do need structure and people around them who understand what they are dealing with and who can help them achieve their often unique potential.

http://jerobison.blogspot.mx


I'm friends with John Elder Robinson on Facebook. He's a really nice person.

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