Amateur Radio Bands

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There are many different bands (frequency groupings) accessible to amateur radio operators each with their own performance characteristics and uses.

Contents

United States

EHF Bands

1.25 Centimeters (24.0-24.25 GHz)

6 Milimeters (47.0-47.2 GHz)

4 Milimeters (76.0-81.0 GHz)

2 Milimeters (122.25-123.0 GHz and 134-141 GHz)

1 Milimeter (241-250 GHz)

(All above 275 GHz)

SHF Bands

13 Centimeters (2.30 - 2.31 GHz and 2.39 - 2.45 GHz)

9 Centimeters (3300-3500 MHz)

5 Centimeters (5650-5925 MHz)

3 Centimeters (10.0-10.5 GHz)

UHF Bands

70 Centimeters (420 - 450 MHz)

33 Centimeters (902 - 928 MHz)

23 Centimeters (1.24 - 1.3 GHz)

VHF Bands

6 Meters (50 - 54 MHz)

2 Meters (144 - 148 MHz)

1.25 Meters (219 - 220, 222 - 225 MHz)

HF Bands

80 Meters (3.5 - 4.0 MHz)

60 Meters (five USB voice channels: 5.332, 5.348, 5.368, 5.373, 5.405 MHz)

Please note that the FCC lists these channels as the carrier frequency. When you tune to these channels on an Amateur Radio you do not tune to the carrier frequency, instead almost every ham radio will tune to the sideband frequency which is: 5330.5, 5346.5, 5336.5, 5371.5, 5403.5 (common UK/US freq).

You are also limited to 50w ERP relative to a dipole. A dipole has a gain of 2.14dBi or 0dBd.

Most antennas are rated in dBi (relative to an isotropic antenna) because it results in larger numbers and is better marketing. If it is not specified it is always safest to assume it is dBi.

If your antenna is rated for 3dB (no designator) assume it is 3dBi, and subtract 2.14dBi, leaving you with 0.86dBd. This means that you have to turn your transmitter down to 41w or less to stay legal.

40 Meters (7.0 - 7.3 MHz)

30 Meters (10.100 - 10.150 MHz)

200w PEP max

20 Meters (14.000 - 14.350 MHz)

17 Meters (18.068 - 18.168 MHz)

15 Meters (21.000 - 21.450 MHz)

12 Meters (24.890 - 24.990 MHz)

10 Meters (28.0 - 29.7 MHz)

MF Bands

160 Meters (1.8 - 2.0 MHz)

160 Meters, also referred to as "Top Band" or "Gentleman's Band", is the lowest frequency (longest wave) available to United States ham operators.

See Also

References

External Links

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