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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 10:57 pm 
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Woods Walker wrote:
Canadian guy.

We had all the right things. A Maple bearing bock, white pine spindle, bow with paracord and in that video we used a White pine squaw wood limb for the fireboard. Not sure if a branch still on the tree counts as squaw wood or even if the term is politically correct. :lol: All of the wood had frozen moisture inside and that didn’t help. Doing a friction fire on the fly and not in the back yard with premade or tested components isn’t easy.

Worse still I was taken out of the action by a devastating boo-boo. :mrgreen: I guess with your kit a closed airway or amputation is treatable but boo-boos, not so much. You did a bang up job with the fire steel and Yellow birch bark. The larger chucks seem to burn forever. As stated if someone can’t start a fire with that they're dead!


Yes, the bow and drill thing looks easy....ON TV! I recommend everyone go out and give it a try, it's certainly doable but as you saw in our video the environment has a lot to do with how things may turn out.

I actually did have "band-aids" in my FAK, they were just sandwiched in between some stuff and I found them later. I really think I could have used the tourniquet or Quick Clot on you, it would have stopped the bleeding :D


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 1:02 am 
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I am drying out the chaga we found and getting ready to process it for fire piston or firesteel/flint and steel use. There are people who have ignited dry chaga with two pieces of quartz or one plus the back of a carbon or harder SS knife. Granted the spark from these sources isn’t much but dry chaga really wants to catch a spark and coal.

If that was a fantasy survival situation worthy of “I shouldn’t have been so careless” and my buddy didn’t tell his nagging wife (I didn’t say that :lol:) our plans aka no help coming we would have tried harder for sure rather than spend a night in the singles and light snow without any kit. We would have made a new spindle and board out of the off ground squaw wood as it was the only semi dry softwood around that passed the finger nail test. If that failed we might have tried the friction fire via quartz and carbon steel knife plus chaga. The only chance for quartz would be by the stream given the snow cover.

Would any of that worked? Probably not but at least we have the knowledge to try something more than just hope. We could have made a bush bed out of pine boughs/logs and a shelter. With 3 people more options are available. Trying things out and gaining experiance with gear makes every entry a winner IMHO.

Heck that SAK striker trick is worth the price of admission alone. :)

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:10 am 
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rsnurkle wrote:
Blackdog-

Awesome, awesome stuff, thank you for sharing :D ! I, too, am very jealous, but must ignore that to ask my questions:


* Do Uncle Lars or Mr. Ray wear cotton in the deep cold? (And was there anything cool/unexpected you learn about layering from meeting and working with them in person?)

Both wear cotton over layers, Ventile seems to rule the roost. Just in case someone wanders by and thinks cotton is the cats ass in winter I want to make a disclaimer:

The cotton has to be very tightly woven and is good only if it is real cold and dry. In no way would I advocate using cotton overlayers in a wet area.

Up where I was it works real well as it has for many many years. If I was to be hanging up there for any amount of time I would invest in a nice set of Ventile or the like overlayers. Nothing spectatular was learned in the layering department, they kind of stick to the basics of what works.

Lars did try to stuff my marginal boots into a pair of his overboots (my hoofs were too big). These were in fact very cool and I had never really given them much thought. Wonderful devices and Lars approved. He gave me a link to a place that sells them but my work computer blocks these sites. Bottom line: I'm getting some.

He also thinks it is a good idea to carry a small brush to clean the snow off before entering a shelter. Again a real face slapper.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventile


One thing they are both rather serious about is that one not place their gloves or mitts on the ground at anytime. Another face slapper: put a carabiner on your belt to hang gloves and mitts each and every time you take them off.

One small tip that was I think worth repeating was that you place tea candle housed in a small can in side your boots to aid in drying. Keeping your clothing dry was stressed again and again (and then maybe a couple of more times).

As a small note: I forgot to add that what really helped me out was two pairs of felted wool insoles for my boots. Like socks and glove liners I rotated these in drying cycles.


* Can you elaborate on the hockey tape comment: is covering exposed metal to avoid accidentally sticking your tongue to it, or does it help somehow with snow shoveling?

Just used as insulation. Metal conducts heat like crazy. Shovel handles, thermos bottles, what ever metal you touch gets the treatment. Little dabs of heat lose prevention goes a long way.

* You said you were in classic leather merrells, but what kind of boots *do* the locals wear that knocks it out of the park? After my tipover, I definitely, definitely believe that gore-texed footwear just does NOT dry out, even though I still like my insulated boots for a lot of the other uses I put them through.


I like insulated boots for some uses too. Long term use of insulated boots (and/or Goretex) in cold weather seem to lead to long term soggy feet, at least for me.

All the locals engaged in outdoor activities seem to use a version of these (notice the Sammi wrap in the place of gaiters). Rubber bottom, leather shaft and a removable felted wool liner (the key for drying), kind of super Swedish Duck Boots. The ones I got close enough to see were Lundhags, there must be more brands, I'm not sure. For regular cold not sure they are needed, but those guys up there are not rocking boots (or anything else) for style points.


http://www.lundhags.se/boots/#listProducts

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:16 am 
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IA Woodsman wrote:
xxxDarksidexxx wrote:
All of the recent trips are really cool! I think we may have a conflict of intrest as IAwoodsman is the lead instructor of the bushclasses... :lol:

Welcome to our little contest IA!


I know, I just could not help myself.


Love the shelter. Question; those Mukluks, have a pair, great in really cold temps, how did they fair when wet? My issue with them is they are not H2O proof, has anyone coated them?


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 1:40 pm 
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ZS 0011 wintergeddon 2012 (the scurvy edition)

The plan was to meet 'Ninja-Elbow', 'Treacle_Man', and 'Reco' friday afternoon.

The location: a state park on the coast range of Oregon was chosen as the wives ( ~future wife, congrats Ninja) were coming along for their first winter trip, walk in sites were chosen to keep the vechicles close but get us out on the woods just a bit.... Things began to go wrong immediately...

I left town around 1pm to go scout/prep the area, none of us had been here before, we had maps but no first hand experience of this particular place. I arrived to find the area had no tree cover, basically we had chosen to camp on a football field with tables on top of a hill, the forecast: rain, rain, and RAIN.

Normally I would dive into the woods, find some natural cover and build on it, this was a group thing so that wasn't an option.

I brought a large vinyl tarp and some cordage, but had just a couple trees to work with.... it started raining.
I covered an area of ground with the tarp to keep a spot dry, and got in the woods to find some cover and gather some materials to set up the tarp with.

'Ninja-Elbow' and Gretchen arrived and we got their tent set up on the dry spot, 'Treacle_Man' had gotten the virus so we were a man down. My tarp was pretty beat up but we got a group shelter up and got a fire started.

'Reco' and wife arrived after dark, he had wisely brought an extra freestanding cover to put over his tent and we pitched in to get him set up with minimal soaking.

( sorry about the no photos of the first night from me, too much rain to get the camera out and the tarp shelter needed constant tweaking and maintenance. I'm hopeing someone got a couple shots of our wet, cold mugs...)

( Disclaimer : My rig has a canopy on it, no minimalist crap this time around.... I had a lit, dry, insulated spot next to a cooler full of supplies, music, and crossword puzzles to make it through the night. )

That night a wind storm came in and rumor has it 'Ninja-Elbow' was out in the weather in his t-shirt recovering his rain fly and moving a pic-nick table to tie it down...

First light came up and the good news was the wind and rain had stopped,
the bad news, the temperature had dropped:

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the shelter was in tatters:

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'Reco's rain cover was in the woods:

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I went right to work and did my best to get our shelter up again ( the tarp was backwards and inside out, and a third of it had ripped off, this was not the morning activity I was hopeing for.... embrace the suck )

repaired ( sort of.... )

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We were cold and wet, there was talk of the 'Donner Party', moral was low...... we needed a Plan-B.

an outsider named "Park-Ranger" showed up and was somewhat surprised we were there, some quick bartering with some green paper and we had our "plan-b", the clouds parted, and the sun lit the way to our new camp.......

"AHHHHHH- AHHHHH!!"

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A single room meeting hall complete with wood stove, tables, chairs and running water, just in time, the rain was on its way. Got the stove lit up to dry out our gear and made some lunch.

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Saturday night was MUCH more comfortable, hehehe... our friend Mathew showed up with his wife Carrie and we threw down some beers, shared some skills, did some 'show and tell' with our gear, and made some "stone-soup"
( throw a stone in a pot and everyone adds an ingredient: veggies, pork, beans, elk, and chorizo were included this time around )

Robin, Bradeen, and his girlfriend ( I apologize for the name amneisia ) stopped in to see if we were alive and hang out a bit.

That night I grabbed my bedroll and found a nice spot next to a closet to sleep.

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We were all pretty stoked with our decision to change camps, the snow was back and we had no worries ( we considered our saturday night a reward for dealing with friday night )..

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Sunday we packed up and headed out, it was nice to meet new folks and see Ninja and Mathew again. I think we all had a good time and learned a little about the importance of a 'Plan-b'.

Hopefully a couple more photos of our trip will show up, someone had to snap a shot or two of friday night.

anyways, till next time......

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Last edited by scurvy on Mon Feb 27, 2012 4:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:07 pm 
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ZSC:011 Oregon Wintergeddon 2012 – "we brought our wives and had a weather event!"

Less an MBO contest entry and more of an AAR and sharing with y'all. Enjoy.

2/24-2/26 weekend was Oregon Chapter's annual Wintergeddon. This year's goal was to get out as many in-experienced people as we possibly could, namely our SOs and anyone else who had not spent the night out in below freezing air before. To accommodate safety and anxiety I had decided to go to a state park with some facilities for this event.

Here, in story format, is the account:

Friday afternoon we had decided to bug out early. I had stayed home from work as we had already heard the reports of "diseased" attacking people in other parts of the nation. We knew what it was but were still being optimistic yet cautious. An attack occurred near Roxxors' work Friday morning so she came home and I had the truck packed and we were off to our rendezvous and BOL.

I had checked the weather and any news of our route to the coast. There was to be a rare snow event happening Saturday through Sunday. If we left Friday we would be able to beat it and get to the coast in a few hours and the cold front would go right over us while we were snug in our BOL. This would not happen as Oregon and nature conspire to slay us all.

Roxxors got home by 1 PM and I had the truck packed with a week's worth of goods while Roxxors changed into more "adventurous" clothing. We were ready and on the road by 2 PM.

My immediate outfit consisted of: base layers of merino wool and expedition weight socks, fleece vest, poly/cotton cargo pants, some good ol' general hiking boots, Beltman belt, some fingerless fleece gloves, and a boonie hat treated with water proofing. In my pockets were my LM Juice, keys, wallet (and some cash), hanky, merino wool buff, phone, G19 mag, Surefire, lighter and smokes, contractor bag, and a small map printed off Google with route info. On my belt were my G19 and "Viking" Helle knife. Around my neck a Viking charm for luck and a whistle and tweezers. Near me was my "bag" with my 5 Cs* and booboo kit. I also had a new poncho near me that I had just added to my truck kit.

*5Cs are:
Cutting – Leukku knife and folding saw
Container – SS water bottle with SS cup and some water purification tabs
Combustion – fire kit with some Wetfire cubes
Cover – 8x8 silnylon tarp and 8 fathoms of cord
Candle – headlamp and flashlight
…add to this some calories and FAK and you are good for a bit.

Roxxors was comparably outfitted, and was sporting her new Taku jacket from REI. She does not own a pistol so did not have one though there are a few she does not own within her grasp if need be.

Loaded into our truck were the usual suspects – shelter and bedding; kitchen box with stove, utensils and food; extra clothing; water; fuel; etcetera – nothing of particular note and all standard things.

All communication was reliant upon cell phones, something we had just discussed to rectify as it is one of our weak points. We would like another option – probably HAM – but even CBs would be nice to have in such a situation. Suffice to say, we received a message and information about road conditions as we were traveling west on 26 towards our BOL and the rest of our crew. 26 was blocked due to some flooding and slides. Further, one of the towns has been reported to be fully infected. Knowing the routes I chose to hit a junction and head north – north/west on 47 as an alternate. Others would be doing the same.

It just so happened that the weather decided to change it's mind too and start early with slush and snow. Reportedly, this was going to be bad. On the route was a State Park and one of our members was already there so we pulled off and decided to hunker down for the night or weekend at the state park. It's a newer one and the facilities were very luxurious – lighted and flushing toilets, RV/cabins/yurts/open camp sites, and hot showers.

Roxxors and I drove around and finally saw Scurvy's truck and Scurvy himself doing what he does best – gleaning for material to make camp life easier. By now, the rain was coming down like non-PNWers think it's like here all the time. The ground was soaked and there was no sign of the deluge letting up anytime soon. Regardless, we found some decent tent sites and put up. By now I had switched from my fleece vest to my prized possession, my wool blanket shirt. On top of that was my poncho, merino buff about my neck and the hat treated with waterproofing. This combo worked admirably as I and Scurvy set up my large tent and he did most the work on setting up a large tarp over a communal area as we knew others would be arriving throughout the night. As the tarp went up I began the workings of a fire.

Roxxors kept watch for other people and any Zeds creeping up on us. Neither came for hours.

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Roxxors and her first winter outing.

Being wet, and we had brought firewood, the wood was soaked. Not bad like in the woods on the ground for a year soaked but it was going to be hard to light nonetheless. I started batoning the logs into proper kindling to expose dry areas of wood and offer of some good angles for the flames to catch. I processed 3 whole logs in this fashion doe a large pile of both tinder and kindling. Not fucking around I then set up a platform in the fire pit and built a shallow "log cabin" around the Wetfire cube I placed in the middle of aforementioned platform of kindling. This platform allows air to circulate under the fire increasing its chances of evolving into a bigger fire. This seems to work well and it did this time.

Fire going and shelters up, it was close to supper. I ate some ham while Roxxors settled for some gluten free MH potatoes, cheddar and broccoli and a protein bar. We washed these down with hot coffee – supper being accompanied by heavy rain and some wind. I also drank about a pint of water though I did not feel thirsty. Hydration, as usual, is important. The "grid" still being up I checked my iPhone and more weather warning were happening all around us but all we got was heavy rain and some minor wind.

Note - The importance of a hot cup of brew:
I have been taught since an early age that you should always plan to make a hot drink. Even in a PNW summer you can get rain and cold. A 500 foot elevation gain is easy around her and what is 77 degrees and dry down there can be windy and slushy up there and 1 hour of walking apart from each other. A hot cuppa and the ability to make this does many things like taste good, improve your ability to keep your core at the right temp, add nutrition, improve moral … and if you are drinking hot tea in the woods you probably also have:
1) Fire
2) Water
3) A place to consume it that is not actively trying to kill you
4) All the benefits 1-3 have to offer
It also makes you look cool. One time I was hunkering down with some other campers in a thunderstorm. I went into my tent when the thumb-tip sized hail came down and began to make a hot cup of trail mocha with my Jetboil while the other hid in cars and such. When it was all done I was enjoying a hot cup of mocha while all the others were running about accessing hail damage to their tents and gear. I looked pretty cool. My REI halfdome did great BTW while the Coleman and Hillary were murdered in their faces.

Back to our epic saga-
Reco and his wife showed up just after dark. They were set up pretty quick at an adjoining camp site. With them settled in we sat in our communal area drinking some hot drinks and snackin a bit, smoking cigarettes, and BSing and warming ourselves by our low but hot fire under the tarp Scurvy had set up. Soon after some others had arrived, Percy (Mathew) and his SA Carrie with 2 dogs. They had gotten a cabin for the night.

The rain kept falling and the wind kept flowing harder and harder as the night went on. It was late and we were tired so it was time to turn in. Roxxors and I went to our large REI tent, Kingdom 6, and dressed down to our base layers and went to sleep on our queen air mattress and 0 degree rated double sized sleeping bag.

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Ninja-Elbow in his 0 degree Teton sleeping bag built for 2.

End part one
Go to Part 2

Edit: I ahve photos but just realized I had not put them on Photobucket yet or have them on my harddrive here so I need to pull them from Facebook. Will do so this afternoon and add them later.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 6:12 pm 
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Part 2

Soon after settling into our bed, Roxxors commented that she could not get warm. I was extremely warm myself. Soon after I pulled the wooby (GI poncho liner) out and we wrapped her up in that inside the 0 degree 2 person sleeping bag. I also told her to put on my wool watch cap since I was not using it and her hat was a big furry thing. She finally drifted off to sleep.

0245 (estimated time as I checked after this event) I awoke to the sound of my tent flapping in high winds. I could see out of the screen window that my rain-fly was not there. Winds were at "storm level". I rushed out of the bed and put on my headlamp, poncho and boots (with just my merino t-shirt and long underwear) to fix the rain-fly. With my headlamp I could see it was snowing and snow covered the ground around me.

The ground was so wet that the metal stakes I used to peg the fly down ripped right out of the soft dirt. Luckily, on the non-wind side of the tent my fly was still attached. I pulled it back over my tent and tried to secure it with the stakes set at a greater angle; this lasted about 5 minutes. What I should have done was set out guy-lines earlier but I just didn't do it. I went back into the tent and found the tent bag. Roxxors was a bit frightened and asked if I needed help. I told her to stay inside of the tent and hunker down. I pulled the orange guy-lines out and my neck knife Mora.

I did not want to set more stakes into the weak and loose earth and gravel on the one side of the tent the wind was hitting so I dragged over a huge wood and steel tubing picnic table that would hopefully diffuse some of the wind and I could secure the fly to with guy lines. I secured the other side with the better (grass) ground with metal stakes – which by now I was not trusting. I had also noticed that the metal stakes holding down the tent corners we up to and my large tent was askew. I squared it off and reset those stakes.

Thinking I was done with my work I looked about and saw the communal area Scurvy had worked hard on was destroyed. I saw that Reco's awning had disappeared – maybe he took it down earlier? I wanted to make rounds and check in with all but I felt doing so in my underwear and a headlamp right now would be weird. I decided to hunker down and wait it out.

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Reco's tent and where his EZ Up awning really was.

I sat back down in the "foray" of my tent and waited to see if things held. I lit a cigarette, wiped up water that got into the tent, took a visual accounting of the gear, and checked the time and weather info on my iPhone. I also reassured Roxxors everything was fine but, honestly, this was a 10 second by 10 second situation. I was not sure.

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Next morning post windstorm securing guy-lines and restaking the whole mess.

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One of my new stakes made with my hunter's axe.

I finally crawled back into bed when Roxxors also let me know she figured out the reason she was so cold was because she was sick. I had just gotten over a cold, well, technically I still had a cold, and now it was on her. I did not sleep much the rest of the night.

Occasionally the wind would die and all you could hear was ice chips hitting the tent. Sometimes even that would stop. Then, you could hear a literal howl coming along the trees towards your tent. It was truly frightening, you felt the gust coming and could hear it and then your tent would "blorp" over 3-4 feet and shake for about a minute and it would stop – only to happen again in 10 minutes. Every noise sounded like my rainfly giving way again.

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REI Kingdom 6 tent in some foul weather.

I laid there for the next 2 hours when Roxxors finally got up right before dawn. She had heard Scurvy stirring about. I could hear them outside the tent exclaiming about the damage and checking to see if Reco and his wife were OK. The weather was better in the morning, I laid in the bed for about another hour half in and half out of sleep. Roxxors made me coffee and brought it to me and I drank it while slowly getting dressed and geared up for what would be a recovery.

I was quite happy to see my tent faired very well after I had secured it properly. After some hot cereal of ground oats, quinoa, rice cereal and dehydrated strawberries and more coffee I talked to Reco and Scurvy and we were coming up with something. Scurvy had repaired the communal area as best he could and we recovered Reco's awning which flew off in the windstorm and landed about 20 yards down the way into the trees. I was to work on a fire again in the communal area when the Ranger showed up on her rounds and checked in on us.

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Reco and Scurvy working on our wrecked communal area.

She said she was quite amazed to see we had made it through the night and we were in a 24 hour high wind and snow warning right now (until Sunday morning as a matter of fact). Also, no zombies had been sighted in over 24 hours so that was good news. She said that, since there was the foul weather warning that she would let us rent the "meeting hall" they had next to our area and she would let us sleep in it if we wanted to. We just need to keep one tent up (mine) and clean the place up. $75 for the rental fee.

Think of all the things we carry on us every day. Knife, pistol, cord, cool $150 keychain 9 in 1 tools, jet engine lighters… Guess what got us a kitchenette having, wood stove equipped and heated meeting hall? Roxxors debit card. Some tent site fees were refunded and that money went to Roxxors as she signed off on the meeting hall – renamed "The Mead Hall".

Let's look at some factors that went into the decision:
1) Roxxors was sick as was I.
2) Reco and his wife had a very compromised shelter.
3) We had people who had never gone camping in anything but "decent weather" was with us.
4) The weather was – rain/sun/snow/ice/rain/snow/sun/snow/rain/ice every 15 minutes for the rest of the weekend.

We were high-fiving over The Mead Hall.

By 9am we were moved into The Mead Hall and some of our other members were showing up for the day. They reported the roads were pretty clear now between us and Portland but there were still some zeds getting reported in the outer areas between us and the coast. It was education time.

I did a quick tutorial on simple batoning of wood with a small knife. I then did a demo on making char cloth. Others went on patrol to scout out our immediate area and look for any signs of anything, other than the environment, that would be dangerous to us. We also made a few candle lanterns out of cans to idle the time.

At supper we ended the night with grilled assortment of sausages and stone soup (mainly of pork, elk, and chorizo), some mead, some bourbon and a few beers. We turned in pretty early. We planned to play poker but we were all just too tired so we sat around one of the tables and enjoyed each other's company until it was time to turn in (about 9:30).

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Stone Soup - pork country ribs, ground elk, all before the black-eye peas were added.

Lessons Learned (aka points reiterated):
1) Cold and wet is probably the worst common condition to be in. You could do worse but you need to go out of your way. I hate raining and 34 degrees. This is normal here in the winter.
2) My wool blanket shirt ROCKS.
3) Merino wool Rocks. Not only did I stay warm and dry but even my crotch stayed clean and "fresh" which usually does not happen.
4) Did some work with my leukku (big knife) and those things have some applications. The best use for it was in the kitchen as I was parting some solid pork country ribs with it. Thinner than some would like in their BFKs it was perfect for all the things I used it for and excelled at taking meat pieces apart for stew.
5) Have a plan B (and C-R)
6) I am getting better at making tent stakes. I turned 4 out in about a minute just using my axe.

Every hour switched between this
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...and this:
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Satruday morning Ninja-Elbow - tired, disheveled, warm in wool blanket shirt and in need of some more coffee, pancakes, peanut butter and bacon.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:20 am 
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ninja-elbow wrote:
Image
Satruday morning Ninja-Elbow - tired, disheveled, warm in wool blanket shirt and in need of some more coffee, pancakes, peanut butter and bacon.


Ah that fresh bushytailed glow from winter camping. :lol: Weathering a winter storm is no joke. The rain/sleet/wind combo is a killer. Give me subzero any day over that bullshit. It wouldn’t take much to have people go down from cold injuries if there weren’t any options for shelter and warmth beyond a camp. A catastrophic shelter failure or just getting beaten down combined with illness could be enough. Exposure is a serious matter. I hope some of the first timers don’t get spooked from future winter trips. Thanks for posting.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 2:53 am 
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Entry into the 2012 Winter Mock Bug Out...... This is a combined effort between Breacher and Spilznat. We are both firm believers that to survive in any situation the buddy system method benifits all parties involved. We bugged out for one cold night in rural Wisconsin, the temperature was -13F degrees with the wind chill. We hiked roughly 3/4 of a mile from our bug out vehicle through 3 ft high CRP grass to our AO. We picked this particular spot because of the line of sight that we had even though we were concealed in the surrounding tree line. This AO also awarded us with the tall grass to help slow the advace of any ground based threat as well as making a stealthy approach more difficult. during the night hours roughly a 1/2 inch of snow had fallen on the AO covering the tracks of our infil point and assisted in breaking up our profile against the natural foliage. We made a little video creating a story line with our bug out. The video includes story, pictures of bug out, description of our tents, clip of making fire starters from egg cartons, wax and dyer lint. Along with our winter clothing we brought everything except the kitchen sink. Thanks.......spliznat and Breacher




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Breacher - Main pack components: FAK, (3) skivy rolls, Remington accessory pack, Small game trap kit containing (3) 110 conibear traps and bait, Primus camp stove w/fuel, Gerber gator full length machete, Light my fire mess kit, (2) pairs of shorts, Etool w/carrier, 3d camoflauge pants/jacket, Sleeping mat, 0 degree rated sleeping bag, Eureka! USMC combat tent.

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Remington accessory pack containing: (5) 12 gauge 00 buck shells, A gerber multitool with sheath, firesticks, magnisium firestarter, Foldable lock blade knife, (Green) Krill lamp, homemade pill bottle firestarter containing lint and candle wax, Polymer plastic ware and, face paint.
The krill lamp is a light source that puts out enough light to illuminate the tent interior but not enough to be overbearing.

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Light my fire mess kit: contains a plate, bowl, spork, cutting board/collander, water proof container and, cup.

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Camelbak M.U.L.E: containing (1) 1 quart canteen, Toilet paper, Camo facepaint (cream and paste) and, camp hatchete w/ sheath.



Spliznat - Main pack components:

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Main pack assembled - Military ALICE pack with frame - The pack worked great for hauling the amount of gear I had. It was also VERY heavy. It contained what I thought I needed but would keep me from hiking far distances with the pack on.

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Voodoo tactical assault vest w/ map pouch, Single pistol mag pouch, (3) AK47 mag pouches, duty belt w/a 1 quart canteen and holder, UTG drop leg pistol holster, GPS and Topo maps.


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1. SOG tactical tamohawk, 2. Gerber retractibal saw, 3. Romanian AK47 bayonet, 4. Walther multitool w/sheath and bit heads, 5. Swedish mora military fixed blade knife w/sheath.

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S.O.S. Emergency rations containing 409,000 calories and quaker oats instant oatmeal.

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SAS survival guide, Foot powder, Fishing line with hooks, Homemade firestarters made of egg cartons, dryer lint and, candle wax.

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Skivy roll, Tank crewman coveralls, (1) set of BDU's, (1) compression shirt, (1) german rain poncho (the poncho is big enough to cover 1 person with a large pack underneath).

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1. Back up flashlights, 2. orange vests, 3. food heaters, 4. brunton monocular, 5. coleman headlamp, 6. Brunton compass, 7. camp laundry soap.

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Bug repellant, and (4) orange glow chemical lights.

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100 ft of 550 cord, duct tape, electrical tape and, orange marking tape.

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Etool.

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Czechoslovakian Military pup tent halves (2) and heavy duty ground tarp. The tent worked great, the stakes not so much. The stakes bent or broke trying to drive into frozen gorund. This could have been bad if not for Breacher having extra stakes. This tent is dependent on stakes holding key areas down.

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First Aid Kit, Gun slick gun mat w/ roll up cleaning kit

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2 - 24 hour candles, sharpie marker, Aquamira pro water filter w/ extra filters, waterproof matches w/ container and extra box, extra flashlight, Water purification tablets, P-38/P-100 can openers, 7.62 cleaning brush, ear plugs. The filter can be used for 50 gallons a filter and proved to work very well.

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AK47 w/red dot tactical scope, Glock 37 with spare mag

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 3:13 am 
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ninja-elbow wrote:
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Satruday morning Ninja-Elbow - tired, disheveled, warm in wool blanket shirt and in need of some more coffee, pancakes, peanut butter and bacon.


heeheehee.... I forgot about that look, at first light roxxors jumped right up and was in good spirits... RECO was up and about short after... activity=warm you can build a snowman with bare hands and get to a sweat....
ya gotta have calories to fuel yourself, I keep a stove and coffee close to my bedroll, and I had 8-9 'fig newton' cookies and coffee in me before I crawled out of it.

note 'RECO' and I are just chillin and thinking what to do next....... slow down, think about what your doing.
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baby steps= we're doing it= we did it.

once our shelter was up and functioning again we stalled out and began to cool down, this is when you catch a chill and;

chill= apathy= "this sucks"= death

we grabbed a resource and ended up warm, dry, and more comfortable than we had planned on. We got lucky with our new digs, I think we earned it, the first timers in the snow did great, summer MBO should be a walk in the park...

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:00 am 
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we grabbed a resource and ended up warm, dry, and more comfortable than we had planned on. We got lucky with our new digs, I think we earned it, the first timers in the snow did great, summer MBO should be a walk in the park...


That's exactly what Roxxors and I have been talking about - you made it through Wintergeddon, stuff in summer is easy livin'. About 14 things less you have to deal with. Went to an REI "Winter Camping" class a few weeks ago and the instructor said, "Everything takes 10 times longer in winter. Getting boots on, getting into bed, making food..."

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:43 pm 
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spliznat

Nail pegs work very well for frozen ground. I liked to pup tent and the Eureka Military 2-man. The only issues are pack down size and weight. The Eureka is very very weather proof. Good video and gear rundown. Thanks for the post.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:18 am 
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It struck without warning, I awoke and wandered the house early Saturday morning. My wife lay on the couch, engrossed in a smutty romance novel. My children stared like Zombies at the TV....Wait, What? Zombies? IT MUST BE TIME TO BUG OUT!

I quickly grabbed my day-pack, only to be met outside by two other intrepid ZS'rs. With our boots tight and our packs cinched down we walked the one mile from my house to the Dishman Hills Natural Areahttp://www.dhnaa.org/. The urban area was strangely quiet. Very little activity was seen, we passed two others that looked to be running away from something. Their quizical looks I can only assume were because we were traveling the opposite direction from them and not because of our packs.
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We arrived at the back entrance to the park and climbed the steep embankment. It was our hope that the walking dead would be unable to ascend such a steep slope. Hollowpoint26 needed a break at the top. His pack was large, and his lung capacity was obviously diminished. We made a loop through the park, looking for other survivors, but not a soul was too be found.

I called a break for the group. It had been over an hour since we left, and our bodies were in need of nourishment. I decided it was time to do a taste test on the MRE entree Sausage and Country Gravy. I took tortillas with me in the hope that it would be more sausage and less gravy. It wasn't. Luckily Bill came to my rescue with some MRE wheat bread. Hollowpoint26 busted out some Wise Apple Cinnamon Cereal. I was surprised at how tasty it was, even cold. Its a shame it only comes in a four serving bag. It would be even more awesome in two serving portions. I packed up my cookset and off we went.
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I also had the opportunity to put some miles on my combined Knife/Multitool setup. I am happy with it, and it seems to be riding smoothly, and is very comfortable on my hip.http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=88562
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Next it was time to check our water supply. The pond was mostly froze over, but water could have been filtered out of it.
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We climbed onto an overlook that had a good view of the valley. I took out my spotting scope and tripod. Quickly setting it up, I scanned the valley floor. The streets were starting to fill, everything appeared almost normal. I was also able to read street signs at over a mile with my scope. Granted, it was the big signs on the stop lights, but it was neat to know that it could be done.
sadly the pictures of this were lost the next day when I dropped my phone in a bucket of antifreeze. It's better if you dont ask.
With heavy hearts we turned back towards the house. We knew that we could not escape, bugging out was nothing more then an escape from society and the responsibilities it carries.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:23 am 
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Last day to get in on the contest...

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:45 am 
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Thanks Woods Walker............ we wanted to stay out longer but we had a co worker that had passed, we wanted to pay our respects to the family. The next one I think we are going out for a week.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 7:17 pm 
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I am kind of unsure regarding this whole bugout concept. It's very difficult to imagine a situation so dire that we would have to abandon our home on foot. I live on eight acres in a gated equestrian community (there's a lot you don't know about me). In case of a hurricane or an undead uprising we would load up the Jeep and go. I keep my BOB in the pantry along with our long term food storage and such. However, in the spirit of the contest, here is my 2012 WMBO entry. IT RAINED THE ENTIRE TRIP.

I chose the Black Creek Ravines Conservation area because of it's unique features and closeness to the house.
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My food and cooking kit consisted of:
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Except I added 1 can of B&M Raisin Bread. The object in the lower left is a collapsible bucket. Very useful.

My lighting and navigation.
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and my tools...
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I was wearing my multitool when I took the photo.
I wore my oilskin dusterand hat, which are totally waterproof, layered over poly thermals flannel shirt, jeans, Ariat fleece vest and wool socks. Harley FXG waterproof boots and my leather trail gloves.
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I do not have a Tiramisu Tepee or six feet of snow but I do have...secret weapon #1 AKA Gina
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and secret weapon #2 AKA Judd
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Loaded up and ready to go! The Cold Steel Shovel is mounted on the other side.
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Photo from the horse cam
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Horses tied on a high line.
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Tent up!
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Groo make fire...in rain.
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Horse blankets are multi function. They pad the weight of the saddle, can be used as a poncho or as a blanket. A smelly blanket. My eyes are red from starting the smokey fire. My CRNT neck knife and Backtracker GPS are worn to bed.
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and finally ... a saddlebag failure.
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The bag was severely overloaded with firewood on my second trip to the campsite and failed along the seam. Memo to self: manufacturers weight limits are based on a best case scenario on NEW equipment. Load to -20% max.

Overall it was a successful bugout. I am getting Trailmax saddlebags, a sewing awl/pack repair kit and more batteries. The horses were imho more trouble than they were worth. Judd was spooked by deer twice and turkeys once. I would rather walk with confidence than ride a horse, it's a long fall from way up there.


Last edited by Wormjello on Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:13 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 7:24 pm 
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A bugout horse. We don't see that everyday. :) Thanks for posting the entry.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 7:29 pm 
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sigboy40

That sheath looks good.

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Last edited by Woods Walker on Wed Feb 29, 2012 7:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 7:30 pm 
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Ohh, I want a horse cam. Cool trip :D

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 8:02 pm 
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scurvy & ninja-elbow- Interesting trip, awful weather-I'd rather be in -40! Choosing to move into the cabin is probably what one would do if actually "bugging out" for real if such an option existed!

spliznat- Good work on the video, I used to live not far from you up in Thunder Bay and had visited Duluth (and Grand Marais) a number of times. Definitely winter mock bug out environment!

Wormjello- I like your kit choices (basic and rugged) and nice bug out vehicles!


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:30 pm 
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Nothing like waiting till the last minute. So I actually got out a couple weeks ago for an overnighter. It’s not exactly a bug out, but I’m not competing in this contest so it doesn’t much matter. I’ll share the trip for fun.

I have a bunch of trees to cut down for a shelter I’m building. Big trees, like log cabin size. Anyway, I with the help of a friend, headed for the woods. Looks nice, but it was still pretty chilly and damp as we had just had rain. So the first thing we did on arrival was start hiking into the woods. About 200 ft in we found a good spot. After that exhausting hike we decided to get a fire going and set up camp.

With some Fatwood imported from Florida (thanks Darkside), my Mora and a GobSpark fire steel I easily got a fire going.

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I set up my tent and got things situated while my friend wanted to try his hand at building a grass hut. Sapling frame, dry grass, para cord and about 4 hours later he had this.

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Pretty good for his first attempt and he didn’t freeze during the night. I went modern with a Tent Cot one man tent. I added drip sticks to the guy lines as rain was in the forecast.

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While cutting wood we found these little fungus’ and I was easily able to start an ember on one with the bow drill. The cool thing was how long it kept an ember. It was probably 2 ½ x 1 ½ and ½ thick and it burned for probably 15 minutes. A very good ember extender. They also lit easily with firesteel sparks.

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So we worked for a while and later in the afternoon we roasted up some chickens caveman style and baked some taters in the coals.

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We had collected a few of these during the day. Mullein plants. The stalks when dry work well for friction fires, dry leaves make good tinder and often they will be bone dry standing up out of snow when everything else is covered with snow. When green you can eat the leaves too. They are also called Torchweed.

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As it got dark we poured some fat on them and had quite usable torches. The one shown burned about 10 minutes. You have to be careful to not light to close to the bottom of the seed pod or the head will just burn off the stalk.

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I also poured some fat in a hollow of a log we had cut, added some natural made hemp cordage and had a nice little fat candle that burned a long time.

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It was plenty cold when I decided to head off to the bag. I was using a old style GI mummy bag with a poncho liner in it. No pad other than some leaves under the tent. I, well both of us actually, poured boiling water into our Nalgenes and threw them into our sleeping bags before we went to sleep. Was quite comfy. Don’t try the boiling water thing in the new BPA free bottles, they won’t hold up to the heat. Hanging on the tree is my Blackhawk ruck and some extra Nite-ize figure 9’s. It’s illuminated by my Black Diamond headlamp. The blurriness is from the heat coming from the fire right beside me.

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The next morning after dragging our asses out of our warm bags, we got some trees cut and when back to the fire for warm-up breaks I started a couple projects. This is the beginning a of a coal burned container. It’s deeper than that now but I failed in getting another pic. Anyway, not done yet and I’ll hit it some more when I get back up there.

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This is the start of an oak mallet for my chisels. I worked on it just long enough to realize I had enough chips to make lunch. You can also see my relatively new tommy in there.

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My Trailstove with a computer fan grate, SS canteen cup, oak chips, Nalgene with compass lid and chilimac.

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5 minutes later, boiling, time for lunch.

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And with lunch, a beer. Using a AR mag for it’s other intended purpose.

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Our camp before we broke it down and rolled out. You can see a Wyominglostandfound teepee in the back there. I set it up cause it’s cool, but also so that if it rained we’d have a dry place for us and the saws and other tools. We lucked out and it didn’t rain, but the teepee is still cool :D To big to heat with body heat though. I need to get a stove for it before using it for winter camping.

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So it was a fun little trip. Pretty relaxing really, gear definitely makes life easier. Sure makes me anxious for spring. Thanks for reading and I have really enjoyed everyone's trips in here. Good luck all!!

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:44 pm 
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My entry is on a little hike/camp in an undisclosed location my pops & I did a few weeks back (only undisclosed because it is a friend's property & not mine to talk about, and another reason you will read later). It is supposed to be about a 400 acre tract, which used to be explored/hiked on occasion, but has not been in years now.

The property has a nice mix of oaks/pines/trees I don't know the name of, and does not have a huge amount of vines/underbrush to block exploration.

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We headed into the place around 2pm, taking a road/path that looked like it went toward the middle. The road was encroached by saplings & branches, but my old KIA Sorento can take a beating... or already has, so no biggie.
Deeper in we found large areas of live oaks, love those.
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Unfortunately, a few hundred yards in, a tree was across the road & the brush/trees were too thick to go around. Doesn't seem like a big deal, just park & hike in... But I had my 72yo dad with me, and wanted to keep the hiking to under a mile or two.

(Not the downed tree in the road, but one of many others)
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So we decided to hike in, find a camp site, then hike around/explore at our leisure. I also suggested we try to find at least one fence/property line, just to say we did. (we later found out this may not have been a great idea, more later). There were some decent areas not far from where we parked as well, so we figured even if going further in was a bust, we would find our way back & camp near the car.
Oh yeah, found this vid of the “road” in, where we stopped.
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We donned our packs & headed in, leaving plastic bag strips tied to branches every few hundred feet as bread crumbs (forgot my compass, equipt/planning fail #1, more later).

I'm not sure how far we went, but we walked for maybe 45 min. at a med pace, stopping now/then to check out cool stuff. Like this here turtle hole (pic was taken later, at night, but yeah these were everywhere)-
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After some looking around, we settled on a general area, but my hammock site was 100 or so feet from pop's tent area. The flat ground he needed, had no good trees, spaced right for a hammock.
We celebrated finding a decent camp area with a self portrait-
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Since we still wanted to explore a bit before it got too late, we decided to head toward the east, thinking that was the closest property line. It turned out to be fairly close, and we hit the fence line in only 25 or 30 min. of walking. To the north, and across the fence we saw some buildings, so we headed that way to check it out. We were surprised to find a horse ranch abutted the property, and there were some pretty horses there. We stood looking for a while, till a big dude came out and gave us a mean look… We waved but got no reply, other than a wtf do you want look, so off we went.
Here’s part of the neighbor’s place-
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We later found out this nice horse ranch had been twice raided by police, for suspected pot farming… We will not be visiting that side of the property again.

As soon as we got back to the camp area, we started putting up tents/hammocks & getting a fire started. Here is a bit of my camp, for some reason I didn’t take a pic of the hammock, or my dads tent, at least before it got dark.
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It was dusk before we had both camps set up, pretty much working alone on our respective sites. After that, we gathered some firewood, cleared a fire area & looked for kindling.
Here’s pops and his tent-
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Here in lies another fail, but this time it's an equiptment fail, and a chance for the first review of new (to me) gear. When we made the last trip out, to find something for kindling, it was dusk. So figuring it would be dark by the time we were looking for camp, we left my new Life Gear LED flashlight blinking, hanging from a branch. Its like this one, but came in a two-pack, one large/one smaller (but not the smaller glow-stick size they also have)-

pic didn't fit, will find another.

End part one!

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Last edited by maldon007 on Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:46 pm 
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worm jello - the horse enry is really cool! thanks for posting, and welcome to ZS!

Regulator - very cool trip. that fatwood lights up real nice and easy dont you think? winners of this contest will be getting some of the same stuff, and a ranger gobspark firesteel and striker. the grass hut was cool, and your damn lucky to have won that tipi! the hawk handle is DOPE! did you do the wood burning designs on it? the handle alone makes me want to own a hawk or nice ax now... :D

ETA - looking back at your firesteel. i just got 4 of them in the mail today. the same model less the mag bar. in fact i switched out the black cord to orange cord for the prize ones, and i got one for myself. 8-) i really like the gobspark firesteel along with the LMF striker... it drops mad sparks, what a combo!


Last edited by xxxDarksidexxx on Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:50 pm 
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maldon007 - good looking trip so far! waiting for part 2, its nce you got out with your pop!

im digging the last minute entries guys! :)

starting tomorrow i will be reading back through all entries. i really enjoyed reading/looking at all of them so far, cant wait to read them again. this will be tough!


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