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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 1:45 am 
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Xmas time and traditionally when I buy myself some new steel. This year it is, what I'm hoping to be my knew large bush knife. I went to Ragnar's Ragweed Forge site and ordered myself an Ahti Leuko 7" knife. Ahti is a Finnish company and "leuko" is Finnish for "big f-in knife" I think :lol: Traditionally you got pukkos and leukos. Puukko is the smaller one.
http://www.ragweedforge.com/AhtiCatalog.html << to Ragnar's Ahti knife page.

First of all, a note about Ragnar's service:
Ragnar rules. His prices are normal, he carries a ton of scandi style knives, he knows what he's talking about and his delivery is superb. I'm actually not sure how he gets the postal service to be quicker for him. I ordered 3 items (leuko, 2x Mora items) last Friday night. I got e-mail conformation Saturday morning that my card went through and my items were put in the mail. I got my knives on Monday. This was from New York state to me here in Portland, Oregon. Wow! ... and for $6 shipping. All shipping is $6 regardless of order size. I have a new thing to be loyal to.

Here is what I now have:
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It is now living on my pistol/adventure belt right next to my Helle Leif Ericsson 2000 year commemorative knife I got in 1999 and still use.
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High carbon blade, just like the smaller puukko from Helle. 7" long, 1.5" wide and .125 thick. Leather sheath that has a loop for up to 2.25" belt. Was a bit worried about the thickness originally and not sure if I'd take to the "unfinished" look of the blade (black scale on it). It is scandi grind.

Will add some cutting and bushcraft action next.

ETA sorry, not a laminated blade but rates a 59 on rockwell. From Ahti:
Quote:
All of the traditional knives have carbon steel blades (.8%C) hardened to about 59 on the Rockwell scale. The handles are stained birch and sanded to a medium finish for improved grip.

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Last edited by ninja-elbow on Mon Jan 25, 2010 3:46 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 1:59 am 
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Blade thickness comparison:
On the left my puukko - on the right my leuko
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The pukko is a tad thicker than the leukko. After doing some bush cutting I learned that this was kind of an advantage though, at least for me.

Last Saturday, went out with some of the Oregon ZS Chapter boys for some shooting. Took my knife (and new viking axe) with.
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Above are some boughs I hacked off with the leuko. First off, the knife is suprisingly light (as I am used to machetes and axe/hatchet use) which allowed precision and controlled hacking. Most of the boughs were cut off with one swipe. About 2 took 2 swipes. I was quite suprised. In the following picture you can see I was cutting at about a 45 degree angle and the cuts are clean. I'd grab a bough to steady it and hack lightly and they'd comee right off. Shaving the green off to make sticks was easy too.
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Here is a pic of a cut detail, the branch about as thick as a finger:
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I'll post a bit later about my concerns with maintennance and give the knife a good pass over my stone. Hopefully next Saturday me and Lenny are going to do a scout and I can use the knife to do more tasks. Until then, enjoy and ask any questions. :)

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Last edited by ninja-elbow on Wed Dec 23, 2009 3:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 3:35 pm 
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You Sir , Have excellent taste in cutlery, I especially like your axe !

Skal!

Jens

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 4:40 pm 
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I love the knife as art thing. After I get my basic utility stuff done, someday, I look forward to being able to grab some good knives with character... made by hand not factories... in the USA, not China. Do you miss having a hilt guard of some kind? Love the sheathe.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 5:27 pm 
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Oakwoodforge - Thanks you lil' drengr 8)

EricinMaryland - The lack of a finger guard; I was going to address this later but will do it now.

In my research in getting a leuko, this was the main concern with most people. One of the 2 deciding factors in why I chose the Ahti 7" was price ($95) and the handle shape. There is not a finger guard per se but the handle is shaped to have a quasi one.

There is a learning curve for most on these knives. One must consider that the original users of these knives (puukko and leuko) are folks that live up in the north were it is cold and wet a lot. The action of cutting with said knives is one of pull cutting. Not a whole lot of push cutting or pressurized stabbing. I, fortunately, do pull cut as habit due to me having used saex/pukko styled knives for so long. Still, I do not want to get all uppity and think I'm impervious to pushing and slipping on such a biger knife than I am used to, so I got a leuko with some form of a quasi finger guard.

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Last edited by ninja-elbow on Wed Dec 23, 2009 3:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 5:31 pm 
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I must say, that is the prettiest scandi steel I've seen... well, ever. Nice knife.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 5:47 pm 
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I wanted to wait until after NE was able to respond to the question about the lack of a guard, since the question was for him, but as a long time user of Scandi knives, I have a bit to toss in (or maybe just reinforce).

Scandi knives were developed over hundreds, even thousands, of years to be VERY good at being an all purpose knife. Anything even remotely superfluous was left off. The were perfected through subtraction. They were also designed to be used under the worst conditions. The Suomi people, who developed the Leuko, are roughly analogous to the Inuit. They are/were arctic nomads living on reindeer (caribou) and as such, face many of the same conditions - brutal cold, lack of resources, etc - and their knives needed to be able to cut up fire wood, skin animals, prepare traps and make household items... and most of that needed to be done while wearing gloves, with numb fingers, in blowing winds. They use a deep pocket sheath that keeps the blade secure no matter how much jostleing it goes through, but can still be drawn with one hand, wearing gloves. So rather than stick a "dummy guard" on the knife, forcing them to use a different sheath style (one that is less secure and/or harder to use one handed) they learned how to use the knife they had safely. Draw cuts, not push cuts... and if you must push, hold the butt of the handle, dont grip it like a hammer.

These knives are designed for survival. If the knife were dangerous to use, it would have been changed a LONG time ago. Its a tool, and like all tools, you need to know how to use it properly... but once you get that figured out, its one of the BEST tools out there.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 6:03 pm 
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Great looking axe, ninja. I've been eyeballing that very same axe for some time now. It's good to know someone's actually bought one!

Any chance on a thread review of your new axe? :D (or at least lots and lots of pictures :mrgreen: )

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 6:14 pm 
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Well I'm jealous as hell if that means anything, I've been looking at that same exact knife for about a year and a half.

I keep trying to tell myself that I have enough knives (my wife tells me the same thing). However I do have a REAL weakness for Skandi knives, so after that Fallkniven F1 I want I'm probably gonna pick up a Leukko (that's the one Skandi type knife I don't have an example of yet).

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 6:20 pm 
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HowItEnds wrote:
Great looking axe, ninja. I've been eyeballing that very same axe for some time now. It's good to know someone's actually bought one!

Any chance on a thread review of your new axe? :D (or at least lots and lots of pictures :mrgreen: )


I will not be reviewing it .... but my good friend and blood brother Hrolf Svartarfi aka Rollo Scofflaw will be telling tales late winter/early spring 2010 after arriving back from his travels as a wandering wight slayer. He says that the wight rise from their mounds wanting living flesh of the folk in the area and he and his band of ex-Varangoi have slain many of these wights.

Ooooooo... spooky! :lol:

Also +1 to what KISS posted.

As one can see in my above photos, the knife got very wet. I did wipe the water off once I saw some rust already forming on the steel (barely). This concerns me a bit but it's just not a maintenance free steel. I sprayed it down with some Break Free (my range bag was right there, it's what I had) and I have not looked at he blade since Saturday afternoon. Tonight (Monday night) I'll check it out to see how it looks. It oughta' be all right but I am curious. I'm also going to put it to my Arkansas stone too. Stay tuned.

@Browning:
I've been looking for about 2 years and this year I went for it.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 3:47 am 
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Traditional finnish puukko's and leuku's need to be oiled regularly, especially if you use them daily. Normal cooking oil works fine, and allows you to use the knife while eating. You don't want that gun oil in your food, really.
Also, if you have a wooden handle on your knife, that should be oiled too.

Finnish puukko's are truly a product of hundreds of years of development, and they are divided by their use in traditional working puukko's and finer puukko's used with different traditional clothing around the country. Leuku is used in Lappland by reindeer herders, and it's form has developed to suit their needs. It has a heavier blade to cut down thinner wood and bones and carving frozen meat. Leuku is also tradionally carried with a smaller puukko, used when the leuku is too big and clumsy. The leuku is also used widely around the northern scandinavia, not only in Finland, and particularly by the native Saami-people, who's main livelyhood is, or at least has been herding reindeer.

Leuku is great for heavier tasks, that are too large for a puukko to handle, and when you won't bother bringing the small axe. You should also keep an eye for cheap ones, that are mainly made for tourists. They won't last the tough tasks the leuku is normally used for. Best to buy a hand made, unique piece that has been made by a TRUE blacksmith who knows what he/she is doing.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 5:21 am 
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Well....looks like I'm going to be buying a new knife. I'd almost completely forgotten about Ragnar's, I'm thinking I need a couple of new, Scandi knives.

That Leuku is beautiful, ninja-elbow, simply beautiful.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 6:54 am 
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If you guys are lookin for quality, finnish made knives, made by a real blacksmith with experience in working with the tools he makes, try http://www.roselli.fi. He makes amazing knives! Also the prises are quite affordable.

Here's a quote from the manufacturer:
The Philosophy of Roselli
- Carbon steel, tough curly birch and simple design make the immortal properties of a durable and usable Roselli knife.
- Smith Heimo Roselli refuses to build any non-functional or unnecessary attributes in his knives. The unessential is detrimental.
- Roselli knives are handmade - following the strict requirements taught by time and experience.
- A Roselli knife is more than a knife. It is a part of the master´s own hand and character.
- Work should be enjoyable and should not be spoiled with the use of poor tools.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 11:28 am 
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I almost got a Roselli axe but it was a bit out of my price range - so I got a Wetterling's instead. Review coming in a few months on that. A Roselli piece is next on my list though.

Regarding the condition of the blade after using Break Free on it? It was fine. I'm going to start carrying a little vial of olive oil in my range bag though :lol:

ETA: reiterating the customer service so far from Ragnar - looking for more reasons to send him money! My favorite companies to deal with now via internet are Ragweed Forge, NetFlix and Tactical Tailor. :)

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 3:38 pm 
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Roselli = WIN!

Roselli is my #1 fav knife maker EVAR.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 4:49 pm 
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that is one great looking knife there, both of them actually. Nice pics.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 4:50 pm 
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With carbon steel blades when it comes to maintenance, the first thing I like to do is cut some citrus fruit, the acids cause limited oxidation making the blade a nice tacti-cool grey-ish-blue, that gets me past the "oh shit my knife is no longer shiny" part of knife ownership. Just like putting the first door ding or scratch in a new car. I then wash the blade with dish soap& water and oil it with canola oil ( cooking oil ). That oxide layer actually helps prevents rust. When I sharpen my scandi's after I finish on the 4000 grit waterstone , you guessed it , I slice a few limes , wash & oil that puppy up again. Nothing says NOOB like a knife that doubles as a signal mirror :wink: Dollar for dollar ounce for ounce I don't think its possible to beat any scandi / pukko type knife from Northern Europe, of course I may be genetically biased

Gleðileg Jól

Jens

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 5:11 pm 
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Just popped back in to say I hereby dub this thread awesome. That is all.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 6:17 pm 
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oakwoodforge wrote:
With carbon steel blades when it comes to maintenance, the first thing I like to do is cut some citrus fruit, the acids cause limited oxidation making the blade a nice tacti-cool grey-ish-blue, that gets me past the "oh shit my knife is no longer shiny" part of knife ownership. Just like putting the first door ding or scratch in a new car. I then wash the blade with dish soap& water and oil it with canola oil ( cooking oil ). That oxide layer actually helps prevents rust. When I sharpen my scandi's after I finish on the 4000 grit waterstone , you guessed it , I slice a few limes , wash & oil that puppy up again. Nothing says NOOB like a knife that doubles as a signal mirror :wink: Dollar for dollar ounce for ounce I don't think its possible to beat any scandi / pukko type knife from Northern Europe, of course I may be genetically biased

Gleðileg Jól

Jens


Thanks for this.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 6:43 pm 
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Thanks for the review . I have a couple of cheap Moras and have been considering adding other Scandi knives in the future . :D

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 3:47 pm 
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Edited my above posts and title to reflect the proper spelling of leuko and puukko - atleast the way I found it most common on the internets. Sorry about spelling that shit wrong so much :oops:

Sharpens up real nice. I used my 6"-7" Arkansas stone to do it on last night. Water and stone polished it up real good. I noticed a little knick near the tip of the blade - must've been when I was hacking the bough down into a stick. There was some rocks down there. Whoops, I gotta watch that, though I am famous for doing that to brand new knives. It 'aint my knife until I scar it some how. :|

Sharpening last night made me think about how cool a set of Japanese water stones would be.

I'll get pics of the leuko doing more bushcrafty stuff this weekend, I hope, and share them with you. Also thinking about thawing out a chicken and taking it apart with it.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:04 pm 
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That is a truly beautiful tool. I have been drooling over the same model for over a year. Just can't seem to justify the cash on yet another knife.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:27 pm 
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Ukko wrote:
Traditional finnish puukko's and leuku's need to be oiled regularly, especially if you use them daily. Normal cooking oil works fine, and allows you to use the knife while eating. You don't want that gun oil in your food, really.

Also, if you have a wooden handle on your knife, that should be oiled too.


I use mineral oil (aka baby oil, but make sure it's unscented) on any surface that might contact food. That means cutting boards, rolling pins, and both the blade and (if wooden) handle of food preps knives. Stainless kitchen knives it's a non-issue of course. Cooking oil goes rancid and/or gets sticky; linseed oil is no good on metal and I've heard isn't good on food prep surfaces as it polymerizes. Baby oil doesn't polymerize, doesn't go rancid, and protects both metal and wood.

I still use linseed oil on non-food wood surfaces, as the polymerization protects wood from the weather, and WD-40 or Break-Free on non-food metal surfaces as I think it protects against rust better.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 10:17 pm 
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As we are on the topic, my preferences for all wood/metal/leather protection/lube/cleaning is Ballistol. It is very effective and is non-toxic.


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