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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:25 am 
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And the answer is the S&W 627 357 magnum. It holds 8 rounds and is built to take moon clips. Damn I love this gun!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 9:40 am 
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I think people are getting hung up on ideas here. We aren't talking about revolver suitability for battle, shtf or teotwawki, I think a modern semi-auto pistol has a number of advantages for that purpose. We are talking about a gun for a bug out. We tend to define bug out as a short term evacuation. A revolver is a great choice, I think.

In a bug out you aren't repelling raiders and engaging in battles. You're sticking to the back roads (or off the roads all together) and keeping a low profile. You are trying to get you and your family to safety. You want to avoid conflict and even perhaps populated areas. You don't want to fire off 15 rounds and attract attention to yourself.

I think the space in a bug out bag occupied by a gun and bunches of ammo or magazines would be better used by things like maps, binocs, communication equipment, things like that which will allow to avoid trouble and keep a low profile. A revolver on the hip and a few dozen rounds of ammo should be way more than you need to get to your new safe location.

My thoughts on the subject anyway. I know lots of people have different opinions based on their thoughts and ideas.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:57 am 
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PistolPete wrote:
I think people are getting hung up on ideas here. We aren't talking about revolver suitability for battle, shtf or teotwawki, I think a modern semi-auto pistol has a number of advantages for that purpose. We are talking about a gun for a bug out. We tend to define bug out as a short term evacuation. A revolver is a great choice, I think.

In a bug out you aren't repelling raiders and engaging in battles. You're sticking to the back roads (or off the roads all together) and keeping a low profile. You are trying to get you and your family to safety. You want to avoid conflict and even perhaps populated areas. You don't want to fire off 15 rounds and attract attention to yourself.

I think the space in a bug out bag occupied by a gun and bunches of ammo or magazines would be better used by things like maps, binocs, communication equipment, things like that which will allow to avoid trouble and keep a low profile. A revolver on the hip and a few dozen rounds of ammo should be way more than you need to get to your new safe location.

My thoughts on the subject anyway. I know lots of people have different opinions based on their thoughts and ideas.


I think that's what I was going for.... and I was still enthralled by "The Road."
The thing about the Road that was impressive was that - despite only having two rounds to begin the book with.... the father was extremely judicious when it came to employing the weapon.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 2:20 pm 
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But I've never seen a revolver fail


I have. If they do fail, it's far worse than if your semi-auto malfunctions. But I've been exposed to a lot of revolver shooting, since the Luxembourg Police carries revolvers. Namely S&W 686 and since 2008 S&W 620. I've seen a couple of 620s fail in training... And S&W is considered pretty high quality as far as revolvers go. (not by me anymore though, I love my model 19 and 66 but the newer guns are not even close :( )


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 6:06 pm 
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PistolPete wrote:
I think people are getting hung up on ideas here. We aren't talking about revolver suitability for battle, shtf or teotwawki, I think a modern semi-auto pistol has a number of advantages for that purpose. We are talking about a gun for a bug out. We tend to define bug out as a short term evacuation. A revolver is a great choice, I think.

In a bug out you aren't repelling raiders and engaging in battles. You're sticking to the back roads (or off the roads all together) and keeping a low profile. You are trying to get you and your family to safety. You want to avoid conflict and even perhaps populated areas. You don't want to fire off 15 rounds and attract attention to yourself.

I think the space in a bug out bag occupied by a gun and bunches of ammo or magazines would be better used by things like maps, binocs, communication equipment, things like that which will allow to avoid trouble and keep a low profile. A revolver on the hip and a few dozen rounds of ammo should be way more than you need to get to your new safe location.

My thoughts on the subject anyway. I know lots of people have different opinions based on their thoughts and ideas.

EXACTLY!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:36 am 
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Stress reloads and revolver malf drills. I'm a big fab of snubbie revolvers, but tactical reloads and malfunction clearance seem to be taught less well or less often than similar drill for semi-autos. These are some links that I found useful. Tried to do a site search to make sure I wasn't rehashing something from an earlier thread. Sorry if I missed it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXUwI_d8JlA
http://www.personaldefensenetwork.com/a ... ion-drill/
http://www.snubnose.info/docs/practice_drills.htm

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Revolver shooters tend to be a pretty smug lot when it comes to dealing with malfunctions, enjoying the reality that serious revolver malfunctions are fairly rare. When severe malfunctions do happen, however, they usually take the gun out of commission. The usual prescription to "stroke the trigger again" doesn't solve these unusual problems, and most people don't know that there is a malfunction drill for revolvers -- one that addresses all of the predictable failures.

The Loudest Click in the World

In the event of a misfire, stroke the trigger again.

The first and most common malfunction is a simple misfire. This is where stroking the trigger again is called for, as it brings a new round under the hammer. If it ignites, you’re back in business. If it doesn’t, follow the universal prescription: RELOAD!

The usual issue with a revolver not going “bang” is, of course, lack of ammunition. Reloading obviously cures that problem, and also gives us another diagnostic tool: if the gun still fails to fire after the reload, you probably have a broken firing pin. This is a failure you can’t fix in the field. You should drop the gun and implement your backup routine. (You do carry backup, don’t you?)

Serious Malfunctions



Contrary to popular belief, there are a lot of things that can go wrong with a revolver. Thankfully they’re fairly rare, but they can tie the gun up so solidly that it becomes a paperweight. If this happens in the middle of a dynamic critical incident, getting the gun up and running (if it can be done) is a top priority.

Serious malfunctions will show one of two symptoms: either the trigger is locked in the forward position and won’t go back, or it’s locked in the rearmost position and won’t reset. As it happens, the malfunction drill is exactly the same for both symptoms, which means we don’t need to waste time trying to diagnose the problem while someone is shooting at us!

Tap-Stroke

The “tap-stroke”: hit the left side of the cylinder with the heel of your hand and stroke the trigger.

If the trigger is locked, either forward or back, the first thing to do is called “tap-stroke.” This is not unlike the “tap-rack” for autoloaders: with the heel of your hand, sharply strike the left side of the cylinder and frame, then stroke the trigger.

A trigger locked in the forward position can be caused by an unlatched cylinder (originating with a bent cylinder yoke, debris, or just plain bad luck). The tap-stroke will latch it solidly and the gun should be running again. If the problem is a self-engaged lock on a Smith & Wesson, it’s been my experience that it clears (shop-induced) failures about 15% of the time.

If the trigger is locked in the rearward position, the most common causes are dirt or ignition debris in the channel where the hand rides. The tap-stroke will usually knock the debris loose and return the gun to function.

Reload

Reloading the revolver often cures function problems.

If tap-stroke doesn’t do the job, RELOAD. It’s not uncommon to find a piece of dirt or unburned powder under the ejector, which wedges the cylinder enough that it won’t turn. Once reloaded, and with the speck (hopefully) thrown clear, the gun should function again. If it doesn’t—if the trigger is still locked in either position—drop the revolver and draw your backup.

Kick the Door Open

Forcing the cylinder open will eliminate a common problem—a high primer that prevents cylinder rotation.

What if you attempt to reload, and the cylinder won’t swing out? It’s time to “kick the door open.” With your shooting hand, operate the release button and, as you do so, rotate the gun so that the right side is pointing up. Forcefully strike the cylinder with the heel of your hand, which may dislodge the cylinder and allow you to complete your reload.

This clears a high primer that wedges the cylinder, which prevents both the trigger from operating and the cylinder from opening. If the cylinder won’t open, drop the gun and go for your backup—you have a problem that you can’t fix in the timeline of a gunfight.

Such a terminal failure might be because a squib load has jammed itself between the chamber and the forcing cone, or it might be because the ejector rod on your S&W has become unscrewed. In either case, it’s not something you can fix right now—implement your backup procedure.

The final hurdle is if you can’t complete the reload because the cylinder won’t close. This is the last “hard failure.” Drop the gun and implement your backup plan.

Practicing the Malfunction Drill



While I normally like to practice as realistically as possible, this is a time when you can’t do so without damaging your gun. The malfunction drill is to get a wheelgun up and running when it won’t function at all. In those cases, a damaged but functional gun is preferable to a non-functioning gun.

If you have to perform the drill in real life, you’ll clear the problem but the gun will need repair afterwards. That certainly beats the alternative! If you start with a completely functional revolver, doing these drills at full force will result in damage.

So how do you train? Go through the motions at reduced speed and with little force, like a flow drill in martial arts. While it’s not perfect, it will at least acquaint your brain with the sequence, so that it has some idea what to do in a real incident.

Once More, Without the Narrative


The drill in sequence:

No fire:

1. Stroke the trigger again.
2. If the gun still doesn’t fire, RELOAD.
3. If the gun fails to fire after the reload, drop it and go to backup.


Trigger locked:

1. Tap-stroke.
2. If that doesn’t clear the problem, RELOAD.
3. If you can’t reload, “kick the door open” and finish the reload.
4. If the cylinder is still stuck, drop the gun and reach for your backup.
5. If you make it through the reload but the cylinder won’t close, it’s (again) backup time!


Remember to go to backup at any point that you finish a reload and the gun still won’t function.

That’s the entire sequence, and it addresses all of the revolver failures that can be fixed without tools. Now, go and practice!


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Practice Drills for the Defensive Snubnose

Intro

Oftentimes when we go to the range, we see well-intentioned people “practicing” with their snubnose wheelguns by running the target out to about five or seven yards, thumb-cocking their revolver while carefully sighting at the target, and squeezing off a box or so of ammo. The ambitious will sometimes run the target out to twenty five yards just to prove to themselves that they can in fact hit the target at that range. While target shooting may be better than no practice at all, it does little to develop the skills required for defensive shooting, and may even engrain some bad habits that could reduce survivability in a defensive situation. So, what are methods of practice that will enhance our real-world survival skills? While this list may not be complete in every respect, it can form the basis of a practice regimen that can help to develop real-world skills.

Double Action Only: Practice “double action only” fire. There are virtually no situations in which single action fire is appropriate in self-defense. Most self-defense situations unfold rapidly. There isn’t time to thumb cock a revolver and take careful aim in the way one would do while target shooting. A cocked revolver is dangerous in the adrenaline dump of a lethal force encounter. The trigger is just too light. It’s too easy to fire when you don’t mean to. For more on this, click here. When you are new to the gun, double action fire is harder. As you get used to the trigger through practice, the difficulty of double action fire goes away for the most part. Work at it until double action fire is the natural and preferred method of fire.

Range
: Self-defense handgun encounters are close-range affairs. One would have a hard time justifying a shot fired in self-defense at a range of twenty five yards. At that range, there are simply other options, and it would be very difficult to explain or prove that you needed to fire on someone at that range in order to defend yourself. The more realistic range for self-defense is between three and seven yards. Col. Askins said that one should not bother with “belly gun” practice beyond ten yards.

Draw: One of the great things about snubnose revolvers is that there are so many ways to carry them – belt holsters, ankle holsters, shoulder holsters, purses, pockets, fanny packs, belly bands, etc. Very few self-defense situations are actually settled by a cowboy quick-draw, but it’s important to be able to bring the gun into action smoothly and quickly. The only way to get the draw smooth and quick is to run through it. Rigs like fanny packs may require some extra work. The goal is to get familiar with the system you use so that you don’t fumble with it in an emergency. A lot of ranges won’t let you draw on the firing line for safety reasons so you may need to practice your draw at home with an unloaded gun. Please don’t practice with a loaded gun in your home.

If you practice at a range that does not permit drawing from a holster, here is a basic drill to help you get on target quickly. Run the target out to about 3-5 yards. Hold the gun at “low ready” pointing the muzzle down at about a 45 degree angle. Snap the gun up until you see the front sight on the target and fire two shots, smoothly but quickly. Lower the gun to low ready and repeat. This leaves you with one round if you’re using a J-frame and you can apply your own creativity to that, perhaps a strong hand only shot starting from low ready. Another variation is to do the controlled pair and then do the “Mozambique” which is two to the center of mass and one to the head. That makes a tidy five. While performing this drill, give special attention to maintaining a firm grip on the gun. Control the gun; don’t let it flip and bounce around.

Reload
: The subject of reloads can spark some lively debate among hand-gunners. Some will argue that carrying a reload is unnecessary and, “If you can’t get it done in five rounds, you’re probably toast at that point anyway,” and, “Most self-defense shootings involve three rounds or less.” While these old chestnuts may be true in most cases, until someone proves to me that they will be true in all cases, I will carry a reload, and often two (and perhaps a second gun to boot).

Quick reloading of a revolver is difficult. It’s easier to reload a semi-auto rapidly. You must practice reloading a revolver if you want to get the procedure smooth and fast. Take three speedloaders to the range with you and load them to load the revolver with rather than loading from the cartridge box. Just the motion of using the speedloaders will help to familiarize you with their operation.

Basic Method for an Emergency Revolver Reload:

1.-Remove the weak hand from its firing grip and with it grasp the revolver from under the trigger guard so that the two middle fingers of the weak hand and the thumb hold the cylinder. The index finger and the pinky finger should be against the frame of the gun.

2.-With the strong hand thumb, press the cylinder release and open the cylinder using the weak hand which is grasping the cylinder.

3.-Turn the muzzle of the revolver up and slap the ejector rod. Cases should fall clear. It is possible to bend the crane of the revolver it you hit it too hard, but in an emergency, you want a brisk slap of the ejector so that the cases are ejected. You have to hit a balance here between getting the empties out and not damaging the gun.

4.-Turn the muzzle down and visually inspect the cylinder to be sure it is clear. (If cases remain in the cylinder remove them with the strong hand.) Grab a speedloader from wherever you have it with the strong hand.

5.-Insert the cartridges into the cylinder using the speedloader and drop the speedloader.

6.-Close the cylinder and regain the firing grip on the gun.



Strong Hand Only and Weak Hand Only Shooting
: All sorts of situations may arise which can make it difficult or impossible to shoot with a two-handed grip. Your other arm may be injured; you may be fending off an attack, moving, or you may be trying to hold onto something. Being able to shoot one-handed is an important skill. Run through a couple of Mozambiques strong hand and weak hand only. Five yards is a good range.

Point Shooting: This is a controversial technique. It involves bringing the gun up quickly and looking over the barrel, but not actually using the sights. Click here for a more detailed discussion of point shooting. Another excellent article on point shooting is here. Disciples of the Modern Technique of the Pistol will often insist that sighted fire is the only truly effective defensive technique for handguns. On the other hand, studies have shown that police officers tend to point shoot when faced with a sudden close-range attack. I would rather have more tools than less tools, and since I know that we tend to default to point shooting in certain kinds of emergencies, it may pay off to practice it.

The following require a range where you can draw and shoot on the move:

Speed Rock (Shooting from Retention): Quoting Massad Ayoob, “My old friend and mentor Bill Jordan recommended “shooting from the hip” in this situation [close-in sudden attack]. Jeff Cooper and Chuck Taylor promulgated the “Speed Rock,” stylized from cowboy fast draw, with the shoulders rocking back and the officer firing as the gun clears leather. The posture keeps the shot from going downward, correcting a failing in hip shooting, but it’s still awfully tough to put the shot in the center of the opponent’s body. Rotating the pistol’s sights outward, toward your gun-hand side, helps angle the muzzle more toward the center of the opponent’s body, and also helps prevent a recoiling auto-pistol slide from jamming against your body or winter coat.” A closely related, but not identical technique is “shooting from retention.”

Shoot While Moving: If you are fortunate enough to have access to a range at which you can shoot while moving, practice this, and practice it a lot. You don’t have to move a whole lot at first, just practice moving laterally, off the line of fire, while drawing and shooting a target. The master trainers such as Jim Higginbotham, Tom Givens, Clint Smith, and Gabe Suarez all speak with one voice on the issue of learning to move off the line of fire while accurately returning fire. It is perhaps the single most important self-defense technique in defensive pistolcraft. For a video of this technique, click here (May require broadband).

Parting Shots
It always drives me crazy when I’m in a gun shop and I see a clerk putting a newbie into a snubnose. Why? Because snubbies are hard to shoot and they don’t carry a lot of ammo. When I go to a match and want to act like I know what I’m doing, I’ll whip out the 34 oz. Colt Combat Commander and blaze away. Snubbies are not easy to shoot well, and if one chooses to carry one, it requires a lot of practice to handle them effectively. Yes, revolvers are easier handle for beginners and “non-dedicated personnel,” but using them effectively for self-defense is vastly different from punching paper at the range. Too often we do our practice and match shooting with guns that we don’t carry, and neglect practice with the gun we actually depend upon for self-defense. This is a dangerous practice. Until we are confident and sure of what we can do with the carry gun, we are taking a serious risk. Disciplined and regular practice with the snubby is the only way to reduce the risk factor of carrying a gun that we really don’t know how to use.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 7:47 pm 
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My vote goes to the Medusa Model47 Revolver as a bug out revolver or as a 'Single Revolver Solution'.
Rather pricey these days, but it's the only revolver that has ever turned my head.

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It's hard to find and likely demands a premium but if I wanted to go revolver I would track it down and sink my teeth into one;

you could even have 6 different calibers in the same cylinder... :shock:

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 9:57 pm 
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I think you have to put this into the right context. You have two types of weapon classes in the "survival battery". You have "defensive guns" and "working guns". While the use of the first group is obvious "working guns" refers to having a weapon handy (that you carry everywher) for opportunistic hunting and possibly self-defense. They are better for rural areas.

The modern Magnum Revolver generally makes a better working gun than an automatic since they handle a wider variety of ammunition, are generally more accurate (or at least easier to master), generally more powerful, are easier to reload for, and are simple to operate and very reliable.

I think in the case of The Road a "defensive gun" like a Glock 22 would be much better than any revolver (since there was no game to shoot), as long as you had ammunition for it.The only reason (which could be a very good one) to take say a GP-100 in .357 Magnum over an automatic would be the versatility. It shoots more types of ammunition, and with a Lee Classic Loader you could probably keep it running for a long time like in the example of The Road. You could even (in a desperate situation, not sound reloading technique) pull out bullets, powder, and primers from 9mm, and .380 cartridges and still be able to reload them in your cases to shoot. With a bullet mold you could cast your own bullets from scrap lead like wheel weights which would be everywhere. This could be a very useful ability in the event of a major catastrophe or you could just stock up on ammo for your automatic. Personally, I have a good selection of both types of weapon classes.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 11:01 pm 
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Either one works for me.........
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All my pistols are .45acp, including this S&W 625-8, so I have back ups for my back ups in the same caliber.

I use the revolver mainly for huntin' an' fishin' and other sporting stuff, but Mrs. Hotlead likes to keep it on her side of the bed, and is starting to eye it for herself lately.

My revolver chambers and fires just fine with out clips, which may give it the advantage in the scenario painted in "The Road". In the book, they found a box of .45ACPs in the fall out shelter, not something that made it into the movie.

I imagine the 1911 would be the better "gun fighting" pistol, and the revolver the better "working gun"(I thought I was the only one who made that reference, right on!!), but bugging out with either one of these wouldn't bother me.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 11:25 pm 
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Revolvers are so 19th century. lol


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:13 am 
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zombie360 wrote:
Revolvers are so 19th century. lol

Revolvers won the West in my mind.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:47 am 
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I have plenty o' Glocks, plus a Taurus Pro 24/7, and an FNP. I do have malfunctions once in a great while, but rare. Having the 16+ rounds is a huge advantage though.

I also have a S&W 66, .357. Outstanding revolver and heck of a fire thrower. I've had it for 20 years or so. Bought it new and have punched 1500+ rounds through it over time (all types of ammo).

I have had 2 problems occur with the S&W:

1. Hammer tension spring loosened over time (adjustable with a set screw in the handle). Wound up with light primer strikes Fail-to-Fire. Easy enough to fix, but if I were in a bad situation, I would not want to be pulling out a screw driver to pull the handles off and then adjusting the hammer tension spring.
2. Cylinder gets dry pretty quick here in AZ. After about 100 hot loads, the spent casings expand a lot and can get tough to extract. Keeping it lubed and clean and it works great, but running around to a BOL and depending upon situation and conditions, that becomes more of a luxury.

(edit: spelling)

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:50 am 
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Worked for Lord Humongous...sorta.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 12:23 pm 
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Sig_Ocelot wrote:
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I use my 357PD .41magnum as my sole handgun while camping or hiking. Firepower and light weight with some serious firepower. Yes, I would feel cool with using this as my sole weapon.

That said, if shit goes down (which it won't) I'm grabbing the Sig P226R .40s&w.


That's a pretty pair.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 12:57 pm 
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Here is my thought. A poorly maintained pos-to-begin-with revolver isn't any better than a poorly maintained pos auto, for any purpose. The one you already have, or the one that actually works, or how about this, the one that you can actually use well is probably your best bet. If its auto or revolver is so much less important than quality, maintainence, and your ability to put into use.

That said, my ideal general purpose handgun would be either a 45 auto or a 357mag revolver. I would not feel undergunned, or incapable or whatever in either case.

Finally, imagine that someone just shot you, seriously, just imagine a gunshot wound in your chest right now... are you there? Do you have that? Now, do you really give a shit whether it was a revolver or autopistol that he shot you with?

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 1:03 pm 
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Shep45 wrote:
Finally, imagine that someone just shot you, seriously, just imagine a gunshot wound in your chest right now... are you there? Do you have that? Now, do you really give a shit whether it was a revolver or autopistol that he shot you with?

According to some people, if it was a Nagant revolver i could pick the bullet off my chest and throw it at them for maximum damage.


Seriously tho, I trust my Blackhawk in 357. It has always performed flawlessly for me through 500+ rounds, and the only malfunction was because of operator error.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:44 pm 
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I say, if it works for you, use it!

I see a handgun as a secondary firearm in a bugout, but if you need it, you'll need it badly. It's the gun you never set down, even while cooking, setting up a tent, etc. You want something that you can hit with and that you have confidence in. If that's a Glock, great! If it's a S&W Model 65, great!

I like the Ruger SP101 with the 3-inch barrel. It's fairly light at 27 ounces, but it offers a good sight radius and better sights than some "service" handguns. It's compact and light enough for carry, is more accurate than I am, and it uses ammo that's fairly effective (if you want truly effective, go with a 12ga. or .50 BMG, but I haven't figured out how to put a belt-fed Browning M-2 in a holster). :-)

Read the beginning of The Postman for an example of the kind of situation that can bring a handgun into use. The protagonist's camp is raided, and he escapes with only the things he has on him. Fortunately, he chose to have a "belt kit" similar to what the British SAS use, so he had still had a few essentials with him.

What if a rabid animal comes into your camp during a meal? What if you stop to drain a blister on your child's foot, and two "zombies" come walking down the trail while you're kneeling down, putting the bandage on? A handgun is the self-defense equivalent of the small fire extinguisher in your kitchen. Not your first choice for dealing with a problem, but it might be the only tool that's close to hand.

All my best,
Dirty Bob

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 4:24 am 
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Let's say for sake of argument semi-auto 12+ 1 ,revolver 6 bullets personally in that situation I am going with semi-auto more ammo more firepower , 50 yards shot no problem I can do that whole day long with my pistol. Hunting anything that can be killed with one round of 357> can be killed with 2 rounds of 40 or 45 . Space saving vise semiauto on the hip or revolver on the hip take same space, ammo it is much easier to carry two or three spare mags on the belt than same amount of the ammo in the pocket. if you carry speedloders they are taking as much space as spare mags . If you need weapon to defend your self from all kinds of encounters and firearm is weapon of last resort than derringer or some 25 ACP pocket gun or even PPK shall do the trick as a get of me handgun.

My new Bug out set up involves S&W 500 revolver , but in that situation I am not alone and there is couple handguns and rifles among us .
As far as hunting for food goes , if I need to hunt to survive than it was long time since crap hit fan , even if my primary location is burned to the ground I shall have some food with me to float me for few weeks .
I shall say this Good knife is worth it's weight in gold when world around you falls apart.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 6:01 am 
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My experiences have been mixed. Got a sweet heart deal on a broken Python, that took $30 of repairs to get back into running shape. But it was having plenty of functioning problems due to internals when I bought it.

I bought a Heritage Rough Rider. Might possibly have been the most inaccurate handgun ever made. I traded for another gun.

The rest of the revolvers have been fine. But they are no magic gun that always works.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2010 8:56 pm 
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there are several advantages to a revolver, if you do not expect to use it in a firefight.

let me ask how many rounds of a new ammo type do you run through your pistol, before you feel confident that is will function properly?

Suppose you find or trade for 25 rounds of a previously unfamiliar hollow point round. I need to fire 1-5 in my revolver to feel confident that it will function. But normally want to fire a 2 full mags before I am OK with new ammo in an auto.

The military limited to FMJ, does not have this problem. Military and LEO have serious resources and infrastructure in place to keep consistent reloads available to them. Bugging out I do not.

Another question is, do you also have a long arm, or is the handgun doing double duty?
Will your long gun be chambered for the same or a different round as your handgun?
Is your handgun is only to fight your way to the longarm you should have had with you anyway?

I am leaning towards a .357 revolver, with about a dozen heavy hunting loads, 3 dozen self defense loads, and maybe 2 dozen light weight .38sp to hunt small game with.

But I am still looking for a good .357 rifle to have on tap to ad to the mix.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2010 11:37 pm 
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OkieZombies wrote:
PistolPete wrote:
I think people are getting hung up on ideas here. We aren't talking about revolver suitability for battle, shtf or teotwawki, I think a modern semi-auto pistol has a number of advantages for that purpose. We are talking about a gun for a bug out. We tend to define bug out as a short term evacuation. A revolver is a great choice, I think.

In a bug out you aren't repelling raiders and engaging in battles. You're sticking to the back roads (or off the roads all together) and keeping a low profile. You are trying to get you and your family to safety. You want to avoid conflict and even perhaps populated areas. You don't want to fire off 15 rounds and attract attention to yourself.

I think the space in a bug out bag occupied by a gun and bunches of ammo or magazines would be better used by things like maps, binocs, communication equipment, things like that which will allow to avoid trouble and keep a low profile. A revolver on the hip and a few dozen rounds of ammo should be way more than you need to get to your new safe location.

My thoughts on the subject anyway. I know lots of people have different opinions based on their thoughts and ideas.


I think that's what I was going for.... and I was still enthralled by "The Road."
The thing about the Road that was impressive was that - despite only having two rounds to begin the book with.... the father was extremely judicious when it came to employing the weapon.


In considering "The Road", when the man found the underground shelter he and the boy stayed in for a while: He happened to find some ammo in the shelter, but no gun to use it in and the ammo didn't happen to work in the gun he had.

If I were to consider a wheel-gun over a modern semi-auto, it would be for it's potential ammo versatility (superior revolver reliability close second).

A revolver like the Medusa Model-47 (capable of chambering and firing 25 different cartridges, 21 of which are distinctly different cartridge lengths) may very well turn you to stone when you see it's four-digit pricetag, though I understand there are several conversions available that can allow a modern .357 (or in some cases .38) caliber revolver to fire a variety of 9mm and .38 caliber rimless ammunition in 'moon or half-moon clips' for a fee.

I found one place at least:
http://www.pinnacle-guns.com/revolver.asp

scroll down to the conversion and moonclip section.

I've never been a real big six-gun fan, but if I could find the right equipment I think I could get into it.

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Полицейский инструктировал меня, что если убьеш грабителя у себя дома то надо вложить ему в руку нож или иное орудие преступления до того как пришли полицейские, иначе могут самого хозяина дома посадить за убийство.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 12:03 am 
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I have no problem, and do, carrying two pistol in the bug out.
One .357 Ruger GP100 revolver in a hip holster with hunting loads.
One 9mm smith and wesson 915 in a bandoleer holster with p+ hollowpoints.

Before the wieght issue is raised, I can carry it with a smile


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 6:46 am 
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I've got a S+W mdl 19. I've also considered that down the road when ammo may not be as reliable as today, a revolver might be nice.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 6:04 pm 
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IMO, the best Revolver BOG is the 8 shot S&W TRR8 .357 Magnum.
It is a combination of Stainless and Scandium, just heavy enough to handle recoil from the heaviest .357 Mag but light enough to pack all day. The prime feature is the ability to mount a rail on top and still retain your iron sights!!! Using lever mounts you can pre zero both a scope and a red dot. It comes from the factory, set up for moon clips ( it will work without them also). Here is the cool factor:
TK Custom or Pinnicale Custom Both in PA. will machine your cylinder
and chambers to accept .38 Super moon clips. You can now shoot
the following cartridges, .38 special, .38 colt and s&w,.357 mag.,
9mm, 9x23, .38 super, .38 super comp, .38 TJ, 9mm largo, most likely .380 also. Talk about Mad Max scrounging ammo in Barter Town, what could be better.


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