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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:33 pm 
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Lolz, minimal gear trip THROWDOWN! Where's Regulator? Also, there should be a Viewer's Choice poll: Who has the sexier improvised buck-saw?

Scurvy: How did you use a piece of wood to protect your 2nd wick? I can't imagine wrapping it around the string like you did with the aluminum.

Awesome entries everyone! They've all been a lot of fun to read, so even if you're not up for the bushcraft craziness a few of our entrants have displayed, post up your trip--keep getting out and learning... =D


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:51 pm 
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I'm still in here tryin to keep up with all these great entries. Been hella busy here lately. I'm planning on getting an entry of my own in here at some point yet too, just for fun an all. I was intending to switch things up an use gear this time too!

I'd been hoping to comment on all the entries seperately but it's looking like it may not happen. There's been some really great trips posted up so far and the skills everyone has brought to the game has made this thread an enjoyable and informative read. Good luck all!

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:11 pm 
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rsnurkle wrote:

Scurvy: How did you use a piece of wood to protect your 2nd wick? I can't imagine wrapping it around the string like you did with the aluminum.






I was going to show more but, the photos kinda turned out like crap...

here they are anyway:

carved a punky (not really 'punky', more like damp, dry will work as well) branch thin:
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cut a slot and used gutted paracord to pull the wick through and keep it tight:
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fray the bottom of the wick to help it stay upright and have more 'wicking' ability, dunk it in the oil to saturate and light it, set it back in the oil and viola.

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Try this yourself, it's pretty easy and burns quite a while. Remember that olive oil is pretty thick and will only wick a small way, make your wick short and your "oil pan" wide and shallow.

the other bonus is that this is fire-safe, if you upset the candle it will go out, not burn your house (shelter) down.

there are numerous ways to hold the wick, from pinching between a couple rocks to wrapping the wick in wire to hold it up, they all work well.



Hope that explains it, try it, you'll see what I mean.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 9:12 pm 
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Regulator wrote:
I was intending to switch things up an use gear this time too!
Who knows, maybe your entry will super charge itself if you do that...=D

Scurvy: Thanks for the photos, they're still good enough to give me an idea. I'll give it a shot sometime, I have a lot more olive oil than stove fuel at the moment, so knowing how to it use for things besides eating is a good idea.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 7:45 pm 
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scurvy, I used the olive oil trick before. I cut a can about 1.25 inches tall and put some cotton balls in it, 2 or 3. In cold weather you can use 5 or 6 drops of alcohol to light the oil. I use it mainly to start a fire where it windy or the wood is wet. That way you don't use much tinder and you can keep a small flame going for a long time as you stated.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 8:37 pm 
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Marines can’t tell time.

It could be because their overlords (they are referred to as Sergeants, Lieutenants, and so on, by Marines) don’t really want them to know how long they’ve been at a particular task—“How long? Fifteen minutes, what do you care, you have to do it anyway!” for the usual hour task. So it translates into their lives when they get back into the world. “How long to get down the mountain?” “Oh, forty-five minutes…”

Or it could be that because in a fight (and I’ve experienced this somewhat myself) that time is just weird. It seemed like fifteen minutes, but it was two. And since time is warped that way under fire (and we all know that fire is what forges), so is the rest of your time on Earth. Warped, that is.

That Marines can’t tell time, plays into this entire weekend.

Regardless.

I start my little bugout review that way because well, we tag along with Omega Man for our bugout. Along for the ride was Mister Dark, Regular Guy, Junior (my 15 year old), and HeWhoFightsWithASpear, RG’s ten year old son. (He chose his name because I told him that we all had screen names and he needed one too.) Omega Man had an idea for a place (Junior and I were going to use the local hiking area near us) and it sounded so cool, I begged to tag along. Well, I said, “that sounds cool,” and he said, “Come on along, it’ll be fun.”

We started the Bugout with OM picking us up and heading for the rendezvous with MD and RG and HWFWAS. Covert Meet Up complete, we dumped gear at the trailhead and OM and MD ferried vehicles so that we had one at the other end of the hike. This is the first instance of Marine Time. “How far is the parking lot?” “Fifteen-twenty minutes…”

An hour later, we hit the trail. Without OM and MD. We weren’t too far ahead, because as we looked down the side of the mountain we could see them coming up. We stopped and they caught up, then we headed for the overnight spot. What a great shakedown hike. It was really a grand way to get the gear tested out and see if our loads were set up correctly.

I had just recently switched packs from my old school military POS to an old Lowe weekend pack I had hanging around. It is basically a 72 hour pack and loaded with those things like FAK, various types of food including stripped and vacuumed sealed MREs, single servings of soup, rice, and meat. We also have 50 degree sleeping bags and spare socks, fleece shirts, fire starters, adnauseum. Junior uses a Maxpedition-something, with basically the same gear I have. I carried my RAT knife, Junior carried one of my old camping knives that is probably older than I am, and I packed my G27 and a spare mag. No chest rig or rifle on this bugout! For this trip I wanted to try a Hobo stove and make a debris shelter as our overnight. Since it is winter, we did pack fleece liners for the sleeping bags and extra –extra socks.
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Water was plentiful along the route, and I had too many containers, I was glad when I drank them down to lighten the load. The hike back in was a three and a half mile trek across some nice up and down terrain with a waterfall along the way. Once at the camp location, we started to build the shelter.

Thankfully, Junior and I found a deadfall that served as the basis as our debris shelter. When we were cleaning out the interior of what was to be our shelter that night, we were pulling up sprouts and I found that the roots were supple enough that they could be used as lashings for our cross members. The shelter we put together was completed in about two hours; it was a basic debris shelter and good for an overnighter, had we been staying longer, or had the weather been a little more severe, we would have added more insulation and put a front on it, but as it was, it was nice and mostly comfy through the night. It wasn’t until the wind picked up that our feet got cold, but honestly, if we had been wearing our Seal Skins which were in our kits, we probably would not have noticed that so much.
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The hobo stove worked as advertised. It boiled water and we ate. It was nice to be able to contain the fire in that small an area, but honestly, for the size of the stove versus the convenience of it. I’ll probably drop it and go to a trioxane fueled stove. For the amount of fire we needed to cook our food (soup, rice, coffee, hot chocolate) it would be easier and less hassle. Or we could just build a fire.
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She might be roughing it, but she is a girl!
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Omega Man and Mister Dark
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Remember those cliff faces, that splash of white there in the pic… that will be important later.
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Morning came and we packed up, had breakfast, instant oatmeal and cranberries for me, and we headed for the final part of the bugout, the trip to the top of the mountain, five plus miles away and through what we would later find out was rated as one of the toughest trails in South Carolina. 1000 feet of elevation change in a half mile of mountain, it seemed at points. It was a bear. A freaking haul. But damn, was it worth it.
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Junior, whipped, but happy.

The views, the sense of accomplishment, the sheer fun of just being able to stand on the cliff face and say, I fucking hiked that sombitch, was awesome. We got what passes for snow in South Carolina both that morning and during the trip up the mountain. We reached the top of the mountain to find that it was 20 degrees and dropping, winds rated at 40 miles an hour, and there was no hiding from any of it. After a quick parley, we decided that spending another night in those conditions was just a little crazy when what we wanted to do was hang out and talk and relish the day we had just had. Since no one wanted to bunker down, and we had daylight left, it was time to run down the mountain. Here’s another case of Marine Time. Forty-five minutes, he said. Done it before. Well, with no pack and such. But we made it. Total mileage for this trip was about eleven miles through some country that was equal to any I've hiked through in the Rockies and the Sierra Nevada. As for a bug out location, there are places up here to get just lost. We saw lost of deer sign, wild pig, and various other wildlife that would keep a body going should you have to depend on it.

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Me and Junior, what a view. We are on top of those cliff faces in the previous pic.

Things I found out about my gear.

I like that old pack, but with its old suspension system, it wore me out. I just need to use a new, better designed pack if I’m really bugging out, My other Lowe pack would be perfect, it has, after all, seen me through several miles of trail in several states, from Tennessee to California. Use what you know works.

I have the minimal amount of gear I need.

I think I will invest in a good bivy; while I like making the shelter, if we had gotten there later, building the debris shelter would not have been an option. I’ve used the tube tent I had in my gear before, and I have to say that while it might keep the rain off you, it is NOT for anything more than a last resort.

When nature shows you water, it’s time to drink, I didn’t drink enough, and you can’t depend on finding water down the way. Also, a smaller filter would be nice. I have a couple, but the drip filter Omega Man had, would be just the bomb.

Find that perfect cook pot. I’m still on that quest.

I can use it all. There wasn’t a piece of gear on me that I didn’t use or didn’t serve a purpose. There also wasn’t anything that I felt I was lacking. Every situation that came up, we were able to meet it. It got cold, we stayed warm, we were hungry and we had plenty of food with us, from energy bars to meals, enough for three plus days.

Thanks to Omega Man and Regular Guy and Mister Dark for the awesome time.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:14 pm 
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Just gonna say here, that Docs' and Juniors' debris shelter was THE BOMB. Kudos to you guys for pulling it off. Everyone did an awesome job, I certainly picked up a ton of tips and tricks for my next trip out.

Also, a teaser pic from my upcoming entry:

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 10:34 pm 
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Fun looking trip!

Please tell me the pic with the painted toe nails was NOT Omega Man's foot. :mrgreen:

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1911nufsaid wrote:
I'm not implying you, or anyone on the forum for that matter, is a 'end of world' nut job.

Woods Walker wrote:
If their shit was any tighter the carbon within would be turned to diamonds.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 10:42 pm 
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Flying Lead wrote:
Fun looking trip!

Please tell me the pic with the painted toe nails was NOT Omega Man's foot. :mrgreen:


Hahaha, as much as I want to say yes, it was Junior's. Left over from the Military Ball.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:03 am 
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Well, here's my official ZS WMBO entry:

When the SHTF it's good to have strength in numbers. Thankfully, I was lucky enough to join forces with Mister Dark, Doc66, Junior, Regular Guy, and HeWhoFightsWithASpear and flee to the Blue Ridge foothills. With a hasty plan, a couple of maps, and some first-hand knowledge of the AO--we were ready when the balloon went up.

Doc66, Junior, and myself made the RV w/ Mister Dark, Regular Guy, and HWFWAS and set off on our journey. Doc66 has already covered a decent portion of this, so I will detail my entry from my POV (well, mostly). First off, Doc is right; without Omega woman to shake me out of my constant reverie, my sense of time is fairly relative :D I blame the Marines.

Here's the gang starting off on our bug out:
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We hiked for a bit, stopped for lunch, and filled our water at a pleasant waterfall before arriving at our first RON.
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Here's my source water containers (2L soda bottle and 1L platybag) filled and ready for transpo:
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Arrive at the RON and immediately went to work setting up my bivy sight. First off, I set up my source water to drip filter, via a Frontier pro, into my nalgene bottle. Then I went to work filling a contractor bag with leaf litter, setting up my Snugpak bivvy and sleep system (BTW for a detailed list and description of gear please see my winter BOB thread http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=88911, I replaced the down vest with a down jacket and NVGs for Binos--sorry, I'm a birdwatcher),and stringing my tarp:
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Next step; I cut down a small Acer rubrum sapling that would serve as a digging stick. After shaving the end to a chisel-like tip, I began digging a Dakota hole.

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Dakota hole complete, I moved on to build a tripod out of the rest of the Acer rubrum sapling (couldn't let it go to waste). I then fashioned a hanger out of brass wire for my GSI minimalist so I could cook over my Dakota hole:

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After setting up my area, I met up with the rest of the crew for dinner, laughs, drinks, and warmth by the fire (and maybe some strawberry moonshine). I used my alcohol stove set-up to quickly boil water for an absolutely horrible Wise meal:

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Later, I stuck my mug in some coals to make some pine needle tea (Pinus stobus and Tsuga canadensis-delish!)

I slept great that night and stayed warm (I believe temps were low '30s). The wind picked up about 4:40am; but, everything held strong. I woke up to some light flurries and a gorgeous view:

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We topped off water, rucked up, and headed off deaper into the wilderness--only to be greated by more spectacular scenery:
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Mister Dark, HeWhoFightsWithASpear, Regular Guy, Junior, & Doc66
Day 2 started off with a pleasant stroll and gradual 1000ft descent. Once in lower elevation, we followed a pristine and crystal-clear stream surrounded by Rhododendron, Liriodendron tulipifera, assorted mature oaks and hickories, and the once mighty; but, alas, dead mature Tsuga canadensis:

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Then came the ass-kicking climb--back up 1000ft. They views were worth it:

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Here's the cliff face that Doc66 mentioned. Not quite the the top of the mountain, yet, but it offered views that Mister Dark described as "...worth the cost of admission". Pictures just don't do it justice. The rock face itself was also an impressive example of primary successional habitat with lichens, succulents, and scrubby Pinus virginia.

Yours truely on top of the world:
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After reaching the top of the mountain, things got interesting. Winds picked up to 40mph, temps dropped into the low '20's, and the misery index was high. After realizing: the 2nd RON was completely exposed to high-winds, widow-makers were abound, building a fire for warmth was too risky given the strong wind and dry leaf litter, and a car was nearby--we decided not to test nature and make a run down the mountain and end early. The decision to wrap it up early stung the pride for a bit; but, it was the safe call.

Lessons learned: know your gear and its limitations. Know yourself and your limitations. Have some base-line knowledge of your AO and BOL habitat, whether it be trails, roads, passes, terrain, etc. The AO we were in is accessable to many day-hikers; but, can quickly become deadly if you take the elements for granted. Work with nature, not against it.

I used all the gear and clothes I packed, which is good. I was also able to try a few new techniques that I don't get to when camping with Omega woman.

Most importantly, I had great company throughout the trip, which makes everything better. Huge thanks to MD, Doc, Junior, RG, and HWFWAS for hanging out and putting up with my tree-hugging ass and non-existant sense of time :D

BTW Doc, my toenails are painted Orange & Purple--Go Tigers!

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:25 am 
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Well in the last week judging just got a lot harder. Had some really good ones.

This Is Your Two Weeks Remaining Warning...tick tock tick tock

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 7:13 am 
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Omega Man, you just had to go and tell all the plant names and such, trying to make yourself look smart! LOL. I like that Dakota hole, I'm going to try it next time. The great thing about that was it was a hot fire in a small space and once he was finished with the fire, he filled in the holes, kicked some leaves over it and it was as if if never existed.

It was an awesome time.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:16 am 
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WMBO from the prespective of RG and SpearYerFace. SpearYerFace in my 10 year old son. He did a great job and probably had the best judgement of when to throw in the towel. :lol:

Anyway, MD, my son and I rallied at my residence and we were on the road by 745am. Only 15 minutes behind schedule. Air Force, we can tell time. :P Anyway MD and I discussed Sun Storms, potential viral outbreaks and economic turmoil as primers for prepping, great discussions.

We arrived to shuttling of vehicles and Doc66 began to get restless and I'm not one to anger wookies, we all decided to get our hike on about 5 minutes before MD and OM got back. The first part of the hike was great, very scenic. We finished 3 badges for my son's Webelos scout advancement. OM knows his trees.

The hike was good but my pack was too heavy and needs to be replaced and the load rearranged. Everything I brought got used but the pack itself was too heavy. We set up camp and hung our hammocks. We ate our dinner and I did all the cooking and water boiling on an Esbit stove. I'm impressed with this little set up. I brought two stainless cups and ti cooking pot. I used 2 ponchos as sky cover slung over the 2 hammocks. I was toasty and comfortable. However, my son go cold in about 11pm and I took the set up to the ground. Once again, I used my Marine cold weather bag and a poncho liner while wearing a ECW jacket, hat, a wool sweater and a scarf. Toasty. I snuggled my son up in his Kelty 35* and a 15* ECW sleeping bag and a ECW hat. Then he was a toasty little guy not having the wind take to heat from under him.
We awoke to very light flurries. Next post is part two.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:28 am 
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Part 2
We had a breakfest of Mountain house eggs and bacon cooked up with the little esbit. We also had some coffee to warm our cores. We kitted up and started the trek to the next side. Wonderful views and get temps. Brrrr. We stopped at a road crossing and my son who doesn't really complain said his pack was getting heavy. I asked him if he wanted go back. He himmed and hawed but said he wanted go home. I told him it's going to get nothing but a lot colder and come to find out, it did.
We covered our packs off the side of the road with a poncho and natural veg. They disappeared. We took to walking back to the parking area and a car driven by a pastor and his family stopped and gave us a ride. We had to walk about 20 minutes before this happen and the winds were at least 30 mph. Brrrr.
We arrived at the truck and stopped at Zaxby's on the way home. About 6 hrs later I got a call from MD. He said it was too damn cold and asked me to drive the 2 hrs back and pick him up. I said sure, and went back.
Lessons learned:
1. I need a better pack. My pack is great for A to B traveling but it's not a hiking pack.
2. I learned my limits. My knee was giving up the second day and I was glad my son wanted to go home. 5 miles of mountain hiking is my limit. I would have loved to stay at out spot and work on bushcraft and imporve our shelter, oh well next time.
3. I need a dedicated lightweight 2 man structure and a light weight pack.
4. I'm really liking the Esbit. The cold weather gear was adequate. My son and I were warm all night once we were not supended in the wind.

We are planning to get a hike together in 2 months with an over night. We need to retest our revised kit.

Pics in next post.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:39 am 
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Pics
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At the water fall. I used my Sweet Water pump here, it worked great, I'll definately use this again.

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A stream.

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Awesome view.

I really want to try a short trip in a few months with my new gear.

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Pleasure Island is a metaphor for the “profane life” characterized by ignorance, the search for instant gratification and the satisfaction of the one’s lowest impulses ~ The Esoteric Interpretation of Pinocchio
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:00 pm 
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Wow,....lots of great entries! I went away for a bit and got back to some nicely done posts with great write-ups, photos and video work and some with snow and cold :D Keep em coming...


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:58 pm 
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Canadian Guy wrote:
Wow,....lots of great entries! I went away for a bit and got back to some nicely done posts with great write-ups, photos and video work and some with snow and cold :D Keep em coming...


Looks like you made it home from the ECR. I am working on the post now but slowed a bit by the boo-boo injury to my finger. :lol: I need to review the new posts as well.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2012 10:05 pm 
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Woods Walker wrote:
Canadian Guy wrote:
Wow,....lots of great entries! I went away for a bit and got back to some nicely done posts with great write-ups, photos and video work and some with snow and cold :D Keep em coming...


Looks like you made it home from the ECR. I am working on the post now but slowed a bit by the boo-boo injury to my finger. :lol: I need to review the new posts as well.


Yup, got home to the pleasant surprise of more snow then what was in the Adirondaks :D

I'll also make sure I have bandaids and not just tourniquets and Israeli dressings in my FAK :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 2:02 pm 
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***Pic heavy***
Well here is my entry to the contest. I just returned from a week long trip in Harriman State Park, NY. My friend Jas joined me, and we were out there from Feb 3rd-10th. Despite being the year winter was canceled, we headed out on a 'winter mock bug out' regardless. Temps ranged from highs in the 40s, to lows in the teens. There was spotty snow and ice, but nothing significant.

Forgive my video skills, they are from an iphone and its my first time doing them.

Being a winter mock bug out, I chose not to go minimal in nature. Mistakes tend to compound significantly in the cold. Once can easily go minimal for a few nights, but after a while it begins to take its toll on you. In a true bug out being comfortable will keep your morale up, which can make a major difference in your long term survival. Also, bringing adequate equipment to stay warm without use of a fire could be essential to avoid detection depending on the exact situation, not to mention sometimes fire just isn't a feasible option due to weather, energy level etc.

Prior to my trip I made a few quick videos of the gear I would be bringing with me. With a few exceptions everything in the video went with me. Due to weather I ended up leaving behind the snowshoes, snow goggles, 1 beanie, and the thick wool sweater, the xgk stove, and the 2 fuel bottles. In their place I brought regular sunglasses, a thinner wool shirt, my Antig outdoors woodgas stove and a companion burner from Zelph stoves and about 16oz of alcohol. I chose to bring the wood stove vice a liquid fuel stove because with having no snow on the ground i will be able to find ample wood and not have to worry with melting snow/ice for water.

Post trip review of my gear: I brought along a few things that ended up not being needed at all, which were the glove liners, and full gloves. Every other piece of gear i actually used during the trip(with the exception of first aid). If it were a regular winter those items would have definitely been needed. I feel that the winter gear i had would sustain me indefinitely in the field, with the exception obviously of food.









Jas and I got to the trailhead at about 2pm and we quickly got our packs on and started the ascent of West Mtn. Fully loaded with food,water, and fuel my pack weighed in at 51.8 lbs, and I believe Jas's pack was 58 or 59 lbs. Being in the car for about 2 hours , carrying a heavy pack, and gaining about 1000ft of elevation in roughly a mile or so made for a very tiring start. By the time we started nearing the summit we were treated with some good views for our efforts.
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A few more small ups and downs along the ridgeline, but all in all much easier going than the main ascent.
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We reached the first shelter after about 3.5 miles in about 2 hours.
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Jas was using the shelter, and I set up my hammock.
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We had about an hour or so left of day light so we went about gathering wood. These shelters are a fairly busy spot and so the wood available is limited and requires a good deal of effort to collect. I batoned a good deal of wood to maximize what we collected, a good knife for batoning and a small saw make processing wood much easier. Keeping a small warming fire going in the shelter's fireplace is smple enough with smaller twigs and branches. We built up a small stone wall on one side of the fireplace to help reflect the heat back into the shelter. It worked well and while the fire was going the inside of the shelter stayed nice and toasty.
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We woke with the sunrise in the morning and made a quick breakfast of steam baked blueberry muffins and coffee, and packed up and hit the trail. On the way off west mtn we filled up water at the only available water source...and oh my effing god was it some nasty stuff. It really made me wish i had my msr miniworks with me. It had the most putrid sulphur taste and smell, airating hardly helped at all, and even gatoraide didn't really help much. We were never so thankful to find good water a few miles down the trail. Day 2 took us down a long descent of West Mtn, and then the ascent of Black Mtn, and lots of small ups and down before reaching the next shelter.
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a lot of minor rock scrambling is required in places.

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We finally reached the Brien Memorial shelter
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And once again I set up my hammock
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We build another stone wall to reflect heat and quickly get a fire going.
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Juno, my siberian husky decides to take a load off and relax by the fire
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We find a spring and use my Mors pot to dip water out of it and filter through a bandana to get out the floaties. We then either boil or use a steripen to treat.
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After a good meal we plan our route for the next day. I spend some time teaching Jas how to read all the different features of a topo map, and how to use a compass to plot a route, and also get a visual fix.
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Day 3 dawns as a cold one, with most of our water frozen solid and we make a good fire to start warming up. I decided to show how to steam bake since it seems most people are showing how to make bannock. Steam baking is simple, and can be done by preparing our own mix, or by buying premade mixes. I personally like the just add water blueberry muffins, and corn muffins for simplicity.


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**I can't get this picture to post despite resizing it** Here is a direct link http://s936.photobucket.com/albums/ad20 ... G_1185.jpg
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The hike day 3 starts off easy following a lake shore, and then gets much harder making the assault on Stockbridge.
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We find a yellow birch along the way and gather a small amount of the sluffed bark for use as tinder.
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We finally reach the summit of Stockbridge Mtn, and reach the shelter which was awesome 180deg views . Water however is a long down hill hike.
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The dogs make good look outs and let us know well in advance of someones approach, but they don't bark until they get real close, so it gives us time to evaluate them before we are detected.
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Jas manages to rip a big hole in his pants and i lend him my dental floss and sewing needle to make a repair.
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The stone shelf makes for a good drying rack for my bandanna and socks
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After being relieved of guard duty the dogs take a nap.
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We catch a nice sunset
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The moon was full and bright and made for some good night hiking
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The next day was a started off with a nice long ridge walk that gave a good view of the surrounding areas.
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The later part of the day has us ascending the fingerboard en route to the fingerboard shelter.
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Water is a steep downhill climb once again from this shelter.

I try my hand at making pine needle tea, and it turns out good, but i should have used a lot more needles, it was fairly faint tasting but letting it simmer on the fire for a bit strengthed it up.
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Several deer come to investigate us
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The next day we decide to alter course and camp along a different route to the south, we study the map and come up with a plan. We get to the suppossed location of a unmarked trail but have no luck finding an actual trail. I get my bearings with my compass and then we make about a half mile- 3/4 mile bushwhack to meet up with the desired trail. The bushwhack goes smoothly, but we did have to cross a very swampy marsh area. It was pretty well frozen so we didn't get too wet.

We spy a nice little water fall in the distance
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We find a nice spot to make camp right near the brook for an easy FLAT walk to water.
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The next day we head north to Brien memorial shelter to meet up with a friend. Day 6 has no pictures, becuase i feared that if I took a picture while 'Semen foot' was around he might return in the night to kill us. 'Semen foot' was an interesting individual that showed up about the same time as Camper and Solo. He was supposseduly doing a southbound 'thru hike' from MA to GA. Semen foot entertained us for a 'short' break, and about 5 hours later he departed. He told us of how he prevents trench foot by rubbing semen over his feet, and how he pondered if feces would work as well. I asked him why he just didn't air out his feet...laughter was the responce. I guess he just likes it. Then there was the tree hugging and literally humping. Then the stories of how he wants a bastard sword because he was a bastard, and he started swinging around his trekking poles wildly. Then he said he wanted to move to NYC and become a 'Rat Ninja' and use a sling shot with egg shells filled with powdered glass to rid the city of the excessive rat population. His goal was to be able to draw his slingshot, shoot a magic egg, and holster before it even hit. He had been busy practicing he tells us.

Did I mention he was shirtless and sprinting around everywhere and its 20f out? He asked for some food so Jas gave in to the art of Yogi and gave him some soup and chili, and 'Semen foot' proceeded to pour them into his metal water bottle and then make a pot of tea and pour about 2 cups of water into the bottle. "Wow this is Salty" says semen foot. Camper "You should dilute it with some more water". 'Semen foot' "It's ok, i'll drink some water later"
Semen foot is going stoveless and eating mainly peanuts and cheerios, and he is saving a ton of weight by not bringing rain gear and just banking on snow...

After a long 5 hours he finally continues on. Around midnight thirty we thought that Juno was under attack by Semen foot. Jas and Mike sprung out of their racks trying to find anything to defend themselves from bastard swords and powdered glass. I tried frantically to uncocoon myself from my hammock. The cries of terror and the sounds of juno fighting for her life filled the air. We then breathed a sigh of relief to find that Juno was fine, and that she had treed 'ricky ninja' the neighborhood racoon, and that 'semen foot' was not returning to finish us off. We went back to sleep reluctantly with dreams of being hacked to death by bastard swords and our eyes shot out with egg shells.

We ended up getting a dusting of snow that night.
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We decided to go up the Cat's Elbow which was very steep but had some amazing views
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We make it back to West Mtn shelter and sit back and relax with our feet up and polish off our scotch. After our rest break we revisit the 'stink water' and I decide that i will only drink that as a last resort and I head southbound towards the Timp in search of a supposed spring down a half mile down a very steep ravine. Luck was on my side because i found the spring and the water was about 1000x better than the other stuff. Loaded up all my bottles and filled my Mors pot and carried it back up the mountain to camp.
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Making up one of my dehydrated beef wraps
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The next day we hike back north to the car
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All in all it was an awesome week to be out, the weather couldn't have been better. We ended up doing about 55-60 miles (plus probably another 10-15 if you count getting water and wood lol)


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 2:54 pm 
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Rambler.

Looks good. I am going to check out the videos after a late lunch. I was at the Wild Cat shelter a bit farther south so never ran into you. Some of those shelter areas have a long walk to the water.

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 Post subject: Little Mike #2 Entry
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 4:14 pm 
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Location: Vermont Mountains
Ok so I can not keep my little Mikie out of the woods. Here is his other adventure. I tried to bestow the importance of photo’s…
Not sure if I said it before but he is SOLO certified, for what its worth
Mikies camp & tent, here you can see his campsite, it is overlooking the village. He built a pit and made the sides out of some dead logs he cut up using the bow saw he brought along. The bow saw and hatchet make light work for what would be a tedious task.
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Eureka tent, note thats sparkling cide & not alcohol
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Firewood split & ready to light in the firepit
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Here is some scat, you have to take notice of what might be around you, like a bear that has awoken etc
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Rock face, since it looks like a face
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Ice on rocks, you could break this off & melt for drinking fluid if needed.
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Better view of ice
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Mikie
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Here was a mushroom he came across, its not edible, so know what you touch. Just touching it could kill you
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:00 pm 
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Beast1210

Great video and winter camp skills. ZS doesn’t recommend stashing guns with ammo in the woods etc because of legal and safety issues however clearly that was a reenactment and not real world actions so guessing no laws were broken. I liked the makeshift saw, tarp camp, breakdown of the pack and freeze dried food.

IA Woodsman.

Excellent breakdown of your kit. Setting up a minimal gear encampment takes time and effort. Often those who are lost with minimal day hiking/hunting kit aren’t willing to accept reality until it’s far too late for a proper shelter. Nice saw and makeshift handle for the hawk. The solar tarp snow melting was also a good play. Tarps and ponchos are very good multi use items.

Scurvy.

Am I the only fool who hasn’t made a saw this contest? :oops: The rifle brass/beer can lantern rocks as well. The can thing was interesting. The tarp shelter was nice as well. The environment looks very damp and that adds an entire world of issues.

Doc66.

Is that Rhododendron? :lol: I liked the shelter but you’re 100% correct, always pack a shelter if possible because the weight and bulk is nothing compared to the time and energy spent on a bush shelter. A pack’s suspension is very top on the list of important features.

Omega_man.

Nice shelter setup, Dakota fire pit, and pot hook. Yup the best overlooks don’t come cheap.

Regular guy.

That’s a nice view.

TheRamber.

Good rundown of your kit. A week during winter even without snow cover isn’t easy. That area has lots of hills around 1000-1200 feet high very near each other. It seems like the ups and downs never stops and rocks aren’t in short supply either. I liked the steam baking. Two of the videos showed some kinda error, guessing with you tube so I will try to view those later. Nice trip!

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"There's no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"
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Last edited by Woods Walker on Wed Feb 15, 2012 9:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:11 pm 
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Little Mikie kicks ass. I think there are some partridge berry leaves very near that scat. This is a cautionary tale for those still sitting on the side lines. Little Mikie has been out twice and he‘s a kid. Earn some street cred and post an entry in this thread!

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2012 9:03 pm 
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Woods Walker wrote:
Little Mikie kicks ass. I think there are some partridge berry leaves very near that scat. This is a cautionary tale for those still sitting on the side lines. Little Mikie has been out twice and he‘s a kid. Earn some street cred and post an entry in this thread!


my computer is back from the dead! i love/hate computers....

mikie does KICK ASS! IIRR he did two outings last winter as well. i feel like mikie earned a prize already, so i will send him a handfull of fatwood sticks as long as his old man is cool with it. :)

i just brought home another 15.5 lbs the other day, and its some sweet fatwood! remember guys and gals, i have fatwood and a firesteel for the top three winners, and i will be giving away more fatwood for other entries, so get out there!

dont be scared... mikie aint! :wink:


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