Portable trail cart.

Items to keep you alive in the event you must evacuate: discussions of basic Survival Kits commonly called "Bug Out Bags" or "Go Bags"

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moab
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Portable trail cart.

Post by moab » Thu May 02, 2019 10:30 pm

"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

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RonnyRonin
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Re: Portable trail cart.

Post by RonnyRonin » Thu May 02, 2019 11:11 pm

viewtopic.php?t=119275

viewtopic.php?t=119152

Two threads with some pertinent discussion.

I personally do NOT support Honey Badger as they simply ripped off an existing design from Pack Wheel and put more resources into SEO and marketing and crowd funded their piracy to boot.
They do offer more options then Pack Wheel, but they could have had the decency to at least change it a tiny bit more and pretend it wasn't a 1:1 copy.
share your tobacco and your kindling, but never your sauna or your woman.

AK, Glock, Pie.

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moab
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Re: Portable trail cart.

Post by moab » Thu May 02, 2019 11:24 pm

RonnyRonin wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 11:11 pm
viewtopic.php?t=119275

viewtopic.php?t=119152

Two threads with some pertinent discussion.

I personally do NOT support Honey Badger as they simply ripped off an existing design from Pack Wheel and put more resources into SEO and marketing and crowd funded their piracy to boot.
They do offer more options then Pack Wheel, but they could have had the decency to at least change it a tiny bit more and pretend it wasn't a 1:1 copy.
I like yours best. Very clever design. I love the use of all the parts being from a bike. Very resourceful. Have you ever built one that could take a larger load? Like maybe a portable platform or something that you could expand it to carry more stuff? Although I'd bet you could balance a lot of deer meat on yours as it is. Ever tested what poundages were doable?

I only posted that link because I ran across it tonight while perusing Kickstarter. Can't remember what brought me there. Not really into the whole cart thing. But I can see their benefits. Especially hunting. As well as bugging out. I really like designs that recycle parts. Your's is the winner imho.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

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RonnyRonin
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Re: Portable trail cart.

Post by RonnyRonin » Fri May 03, 2019 10:22 pm

If you read further on the build thread there are several tests in different terrain and weights. the two full fuel cans+cart weight was right around 100lbs and was beyond easy on flat paved ground. At the low speeds involved I think you could push the safety margins of all the bike parts involved several times beyond what you could load them when used for a bike; I'd suspect 200lbs would be easy enough except for loading it up and setting it down. Of course on hilly and uneven ground its a different ball game but the nearly 60lbs I used in the one test was easily manhandled up and down steep sandy hills, on any given hiking trail without stairs I'd say 100lbs is still practical for someone of good fitness. As I think I mentioned, unless carrying liquids bulk limits hit before weight limits, and a larger flatbed cart would be counter productive to a maneuverable compact cart. I will likely pursue one of two directions for expanding cargo:

1) custom cargo bike style large and long panniers
2) simply strapping large dry bags to all sides.

the latter is easier and thus more likely, I frequently use 65L sea to summit Big River dry bags on pack frames and in pulk sleds and has proven a perfect size to carry and segregate gear; for instance "his hers and ours" bags. I think I could easily mount 3-4 of these bags to the cart, giving upwards of 250 Liters of storage. I'm still playing with the cart-raft-pulk trinity idea, and I think 3 dry bags would fit in/on all three with enough room for the two unused transports in any given mode. Combined with smaller backpacks or combat loads on the people pushing/pulling/paddling you'd have pretty extensive options.

Image

I did take my two carts hunting last season, but did not get to test them with meat.
share your tobacco and your kindling, but never your sauna or your woman.

AK, Glock, Pie.

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moab
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Re: Portable trail cart.

Post by moab » Fri May 03, 2019 11:23 pm

Your avatar reminded me of this.

Did I ever tell you about the Juki industrial sewing machine I once had? HAd a one inch rise and was used to sew heavy leather. I used it to make thick nylon web dog leashes. I had a dog leash company for a short time. I love that machine. It would sew anything. I think I paid $1500 for it new. I sold it a few years ago. Couldn't justify the space in my garage. And hadn't used it for years. Now I kinda wish I had held onto it.

I did see your jerry cans loaded up. But had not even thought about how much those much weigh. Ever thought of selling your carts?
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

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RonnyRonin
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Re: Portable trail cart.

Post by RonnyRonin » Sat May 04, 2019 12:13 am

not much point in selling them given the low cost and effort to build them, and there is an issue with consistently sourcing parts as thrift stores are the main way to keep costs down. I'd rather people just build them themselves.

about two years ago I upgraded to a Juki 1541, which has really expanded what I'm able to do at home. It does eat up a good bit of space in my one-bedroom apartment but luckily I have an understanding wife. Now I need a lighter weight sewing machine for sewing lighter garment fabrics, but that might take more space then I have. The machine in my avatar was sentimental but I don't miss it one bit, once you go industrial you never go back.
share your tobacco and your kindling, but never your sauna or your woman.

AK, Glock, Pie.

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moab
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Re: Portable trail cart.

Post by moab » Sat May 04, 2019 12:39 pm

RonnyRonin wrote:
Sat May 04, 2019 12:13 am
not much point in selling them given the low cost and effort to build them, and there is an issue with consistently sourcing parts as thrift stores are the main way to keep costs down. I'd rather people just build them themselves.

about two years ago I upgraded to a Juki 1541, which has really expanded what I'm able to do at home. It does eat up a good bit of space in my one-bedroom apartment but luckily I have an understanding wife. Now I need a lighter weight sewing machine for sewing lighter garment fabrics, but that might take more space then I have. The machine in my avatar was sentimental but I don't miss it one bit, once you go industrial you never go back.
I'm a novice to beginner sewer (is that a word? lol). And I could use that Juki from day one without any problems. Of course I bought it in the LA fashion district from a real industrial sewing shop. That also tuned it for me. And set up all my stuff. I then built jigs with a friend of mine that had some heavy duty metal working skills and equipment. But that sewing machine place could build anything you wanted into a sewing machine. They supplied and serviced the LA fashion district sewing factories. So nothing was beyond their capabilities. Best $80 I ever spent was having them set my machine up. I was working with the thickest highest grade nylon webbing and IIRC dacron thread or nylon - one of the two. It would eat thru 3 or 4 layers of webbing with no problem at all. I could go as slow as I wanted and as fast as I wanted. Was such an accurate machine.

My mother has a quilting business and a long arm computerized machine. It's pretty amazing. You can sew freehand with it. And make any pattern you want from a computer. And any size fabric. You could make tents with that machine.

You have a nice wife. I remember when I got my Juki I was single and living in a studio apartment in one of the worst neighborhoods in LA in Venice. I lived next door to the mother of the leader of the Venice Sholine Crips. My apartment was actually her master bedroom sectioned off. I also had a dog. And all of my possessions came from things I found in alleys or at the Boys & Girls Club thrift store. In an apartment that was about 400 sq ft? I did have a little walled in porch. That separated me from the homies playing dominoes outside my window everyday. I almost got beat up and mugged there one night. But I'm 6'3" and had been working on my leashes for days and hadn't shaved or anything. And generally looked like someone you shouldn't fuck with. I had also just gotten out of the MArine Corps a few years before. And was working out hard on Venice beach. These two guys jumped me coming around a corner. But stopped at the last minute. And stared at me. One of them urging the other on to beat me. I just held my ground. And stared back. As much out of fear as aggression. lol. Finally they took off by scaling the 8 foot wall around my apartment complex. The adrenaline just got to be to much for them.

Once I got a GF. I only had her over a couple of times. As it was too dangerous. I always told her you go out of here and turn left not right. Cause if you turned right you'd get accosted by little drug dealers swarming your car. And throwing things at you if you weren't a buyer. It was a crazy place back then.

But I built all my dog leashes in that little apt. They were high end. And hard to sell. But I sold them. That was 30 years ago. And I've been thru three business' since. EAch one more successful.

I admire your work, Ronny. You have a real talent.
"Ideas are more dangerous than guns. We don't let our people have guns. Why would we let them have ideas?" Josef Stalin

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Re: Portable trail cart.

Post by Burncycle » Tue May 14, 2019 3:47 am

Ever see a bushcrafty video where they do something clever that seems silly obvious in retrospect, but it just never occurred to you?

These carts remind me of that!

I'm not saying you shouldn't keep your gear man portable, but in the vast majority of cases you'll either have transportation or be traversing terrain suitable to roll that stuff (choose your poison) and get it off your back. Even most off road trails. Sure there are exceptions -- deep snow, mud, swamp, abseiling, rappelling, or literally blazing a trail, but the vast majority of the time there's often an easier way than just humping it. Seems like people packing 60-80+ pound rucks and marching with it as if it's the only option when they're making it harder than it has to be. IMO, if at all possible I'd like to get to my destination without being completely wiped out.

I like the idea of force multipliers like carts. I've been thinking about getting a folding mountain bike, or even a folding electric bike, so you have the option of going heavy and using it like a push-cart, or going light and riding (say after establishing camp), all while still being able to stow it in a vehicle, and since it's narrow it can be pushed along most trails wide enough for people, and manhandled over obstacles if you encounter them. Also fits in pretty decently in urban areas and not just back country.

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